Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

21 - 31 of 31 Posts
H

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
Hauled some sheets of drywall for a Viet vet and his family yesterday. His local VFW had 4 old guys in their 80s or 90s there with 20 or so other vets and their families. Made my heart feel lighter.

I did pull the front page of major newspapers from 2003 to 2013s and I am correct. About a fourth the coverage this year on front pages or covered as major events. No way to find an internet comparison from then to now that I could find.

My interest in Dec 7th coverage comes from having a father who served in the Pacific islands for 3 years after entering with false paper work at 16. Just feel that other things have become more important to people today than remembering how we got here. It is now the 8th of Dec and life moved on overnight to more pressing matters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,795 Posts
My interest in Dec 7th coverage comes from having a father who served in the Pacific islands for 3 years after entering with false paper work at 16. Just feel that other things have become more important to people today than remembering how we got here. It is now the 8th of Dec and life moved on overnight to more pressing matters.
+1 My Dad went in the Navy at 17. He quit high school and went and convinced my Grandfather to co-sign his papers to get in. He returned in 1945 to high school and finished his senior year. He was in the anti-submarine (u boat) service in the North Atlantic defending the shipping lines to the UK from the wolf packs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,692 Posts
Hap, there's a link between our two countries in all this. Imperial Navy pilot Mitsuo Fuchida headed the formation that led the first wave of attacks on Pearl Harbour on December 7, 1941. 9 weeks later he led 188 planes in the first of 64 raids on Darwin. So, there's still alot of people down here who are aware of the significance of the 7th!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,150 Posts
I believe more ships were lost in the first Darwin raid than Pearl, including many US ships. Of course by then the govt was heavily censoring reporting of the war, so the public was unaware of the magnitude of the raid until many years after the war ended, which is why it's an almost forgotten incident.
The engagement that means most to Australians is the Battle of the Coral Sea (May 4-8 1942), which stopped the Japanese from invading Port Moresby PNG. It was the first significant defeat suffered by the Imperial Navy. The first naval battle where the combatant ships never had eye contact with each other, being mainly fought by carrier based planes. & definitely saved Nth Qld from being attacked by the Japs. Something that most Nth Queenslanders remember gratefully, & why US warships will always find a friendly welcome up this way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
441 Posts
Hello Hap. Just wanted to say that I remembered. My dad was a WWII Pacific Theater combat vet. Because of him, I feel a connection to all those who served. Can't let 12/7/41 or 6/6/44 pass without taking time out to honor them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
My buddy and I remembered the date. Partly because years ago we were at the bar drinking kamikaze shots with a Japanese looking chick with aftermarket boobs on 12/7. We were bombed.

As far as it being PC to talk about...they attacked us, so screw that.

I am glad the bomb was used (both) to end the war. There was such national pride, it had to be broken in half to get them to surrender.

It cost a lot of lives, but their leaders should have left the US alone.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
It seems so many here have a connection to those who served in the Pacific. I'm reminded of a story about a guy who fled Europe with his family to avoid the onslaught that was coming there. He decided to take his family as far away as he could and settled on a little island in the South Pacific. Unfortunately, the little island he picked turned out to be... Guadalcanal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,795 Posts
It seems so many here have a connection to those who served in the Pacific. I'm reminded of a story about a guy who fled Europe with his family to avoid the onslaught that was coming there. He decided to take his family as far away as he could and settled on a little island in the South Pacific. Unfortunately, the little island he picked turned out to be... Guadalcanal.
seriously bad choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
968 Posts
I am glad the bomb was used (both) to end the war. There was such national pride, it had to be broken in half to get them to surrender.
At the same time, we set the precedent and remain the only country in the world to have actually used nuclear weapons in combat.

That's something we want everyone to agree is unacceptable, but we continue to rationalize our own use.

Certainly I agree that there were no good alternatives at the time. The Japanese would never have surrendered without some major point of humiliation. Still, we're the ones who opened Pandora's box, and the fact that we still have to create justifications for our decisions suggests that the decisions were certainly controversial.

After the war, we went further astray. We started assorted nukes for peace programs, and trained virtually the whole world in nuclear physics, on the theory that if we controlled the training, we would have some control of where it all led. Most folks know how that has turned out. We had assorted Middle Eastern graduate students studying at all of our great universities. We had functioning nuclear reactors on many campuses. I personally went through the decommissioning process for reactors on three different campuses during the 80's and 90's as the nuclear power industry tanked and universities recognized the liabilities associated with keeping reactor programs in operation.

And then we come to the fact that there are no historical precedents to suggest that any human society has the capability to be stewards of ANY dangerous resources for more than 1000 years. If the true costs of nuclear power were included in the accounting, it would be recognized as the most expensive source of power on the planet.

There are no good sides to "Oppenheimer's Toy," accept possibly in medical applications of radiation, and we did not need the bomb to uncover that purpose. The Curie's work would have been enough to get that started.
 
21 - 31 of 31 Posts
Top