Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was hoping to finish a complete winter service (I live in the Great White North - Toronto, Can.) to my '12 Bird 1600 with a brake fluid flush. Of course this requires the Dealertool to flush the ABS unit. Would anyone out there be willing to lend/sell me their copy? Apparently I can purchase a new key, but not the whole kit as they are out of stock. I have the adapter cable that I purchsed for the TuneECU, which I am assuming will work with Dealertool. If anyone has some workaround that doesn't require the Dealertool I am all ears. Thanks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,283 Posts
I can send you software, however, I can’t send exe files or folders containing them to our ftp server. How to get them to you? However, I don’t think the FTDI chip cable (for TuneEcu) will work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I can send you software, however, I can’t send exe files or folders containing them to our ftp server. How to get them to you? However, I don’t think the FTDI chip cable (for TuneEcu) will work.
Thanks Dougl1000. I will try to contact dealertool and see what they have to say about a key using your software and whetther a new cable is required. I'll get back to you. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,688 Posts
Be aware that unless the upgraded version was purchased, DealerTool will only work for one specific serial number.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Be aware that unless the upgraded version was purchased, DealerTool will only work for one specific serial number.
VABird, thanks for the heads up. A quick trip to the website verified your comment. A new unused copy is coming from BC_Rob.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I am new to Triumphs, and bikes less than 20 years old, so can someone please explain to me why I need a computer to change brake fluid? Can I not just pull most of the fluid out of the master then refill with fresh fluid and pump the brake till it runs clear without emptying the master cylinder? Why do I need to reset the ABS with a computer?
Thanks for any input,
Bron
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,688 Posts
You can get most of of the fluid out without it. The computer & Dealertool allows you to activate the ABS switch to get all of it out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
107 Posts
Or the old fluid gets out by riding the bike and braking hard enough that the old fluid gets released. I would venture that if you replaced, ride with some hard braking, replaced, repeat, by the 3rd cycle you should be mainly clear. Also good emergency stopping practice. You will definitely feel when the system is activated while riding. Basically the tool activates the system without the emergency stop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,688 Posts
..... and you get the added benefit of getting new tires much more frequently!
If a technology deficient guy like me can learn to use it, anyone can.
I suggest the Dealertool and a laptop that is dedicated to the task.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
107 Posts
I doubt you would tear up your tires too bad doing a couple practice emergency stops. Any quality rider instructor or manual that I have ever talked to or read recommends controlled emergency stopping practice. On the other hand someone messing with their ECU without experience may fry that, which might cost much more to fix than a tire. I have tuneecu and have adjusted my mapping, so not afraid of it, just was offering up another option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Or the old fluid gets out by riding the bike and braking hard enough that the old fluid gets released. I would venture that if you replaced, ride with some hard braking, replaced, repeat, by the 3rd cycle you should be mainly clear. Also good emergency stopping practice. You will definitely feel when the system is activated while riding. Basically the tool activates the system without the emergency stop.
I question your comment about the hard braking. When the brakes are applied the fluid flows out and back, meaning there is no net flow from one point to the next, so hard braking would not move any fluid closer to the bleed fitting, including that in the ABS module.
I did a quick calculation based on the volume of the caliper pistons and the total volume of moving fluid,based on piston travel of around .010" (10 thou) or .25mm. It worked out to about 2 milliliters or .4 teaspoon. That's why the brake lever moves so little to apply the brakes. I think the fluid in the ABS module has to be flushed out by opening the valves and sqeezing/pressing the brake lever. If I am missing something here let me know.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
107 Posts
I question your comment about the hard braking. When the brakes are applied the fluid flows out and back, meaning there is no net flow from one point to the next, so hard braking would not move any fluid closer to the bleed fitting, including that in the ABS module.
I did a quick calculation based on the volume of the caliper pistons and the total volume of moving fluid,based on piston travel of around .010" (10 thou) or .25mm. It worked out to about 2 milliliters or .4 teaspoon. That's why the brake lever moves so little to apply the brakes. I think the fluid in the ABS module has to be flushed out by opening the valves and sqeezing/pressing the brake lever. If I am missing something here let me know.
Yes the Dealertool would be the preferred way. I am not sure of the physics of liquid transfer and how much getting flushed out of the ABS module during hard braking blends with the rest in the system. In my case I had just gotten my brake fluid flushed at the end of last year, it has maybe 1000 miles and 6 months on it when I had to drain and bleed the rear to install foot boards. If your theory is correct, I should be ok. If some of the almost new ABS module fluid mixes with my once again brand new fluid, I should be ok as well. And I got to practice some emergency braking, always a good thing to do to be better prepared for an actual real panic stop so that I know how the bike reacts and I live to buy another rear tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Yes the Dealertool would be the preferred way. I am not sure of the physics of liquid transfer and how much getting flushed out of the ABS module during hard braking blends with the rest in the system. In my case I had just gotten my brake fluid flushed at the end of last year, it has maybe 1000 miles and 6 months on it when I had to drain and bleed the rear to install foot boards. If your theory is correct, I should be ok. If some of the almost new ABS module fluid mixes with my once again brand new fluid, I should be ok as well. And I got to practice some emergency braking, always a good thing to do to be better prepared for an actual real panic stop so that I know how the bike reacts and I live to buy another rear tire.
Yes agreed, you should be fine topping up. In theory practicing those panic stops with ABS should not be too hard on the rubber as you are not skidding thereby leaving much on the road!
My first bike, a 1996 Kawasaki Concours (sport touring) taught me the "reality" of panic stopping. Locked up the front wheel and BANG, I was on the ground in less that the blink of an eye...low side, fortunately. New rider, inexperienced, too much bike, etc, etc. What can I say? I am a fan of ABS.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top