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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was in accident last month after a group ride wadded up it looks like they are going to total out my buell. I have a few more weeks of Physical therapy and am about 80% there..

I was at the local dealer and the bike fits nice and the price is good but I have some reservations..


:???: Most my bikes have been twins and I've only had on inline four and I hated way it pulled. I'm a big guy 6'1" 250LBS I hated how the Ninja's power seamed to be all or nothing.

:???: How does a inline three pull compared to buell or ducati twins..

:???: How are brakes on the bike especially the front.. I've heard all sorts of issues for the Speed Triple

:???: How is the bike working for you 200LB+ guys...

:???: Is anyone making a Steering damper for this bike yet?
I do most my own work on my bikes how easy is this bike to wrench on?
 

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Let's see- most of these answers are subjective, since I am really an inline four squid who finally discovered torque.

1. There are plenty of guys your size on 675s and similar bikes, but it isn't a big twin. It has more torque and a flatter torque curve than a typical supersport bike, but remember that it is a supersport bike in the end. It isn't a big twin, but if you let it rev, it will outrun a lot of big twins once it gets into the meat of its powerband. That said, it doesn't have a lightswitch power band. Think of it as somewhere between a 600 cc four and a Ducati 749. That is what it is, and what its powerband is like.

2. It won't pull as hard right off idle, but give it a few revs, and the Ducati better be a 999 or you will disappear from it. Likewise, a Buell will get the holeshot, but that is about it.

3. The quickest stopping bike Motorcycle Consumer News ever tested was a Speed Triple. The complaint that people have is the lever feel, not how fast it stops. The brakes on the 675 feel a lot better, and you can loft the rear wheel without a whole lot of trouble. I have no problems taking people on the brakes during trackdays.

4. I will have to defer to a 200+ guy about that.

5. It has a steering damper on it from the factory, but if you don't like that damper, there are a number of aftermarket choices that mount in all kinds of places. Scotts doesn't make a bracket to mount their damper, which is too bad, since I already have one, but just about everyone else does.

6. The plastic is a joy to pull off and put back on because it fits so well and is so logical. It isn't a fiddly mess like a Yamaha or Honda. Most things are accessible, although I haven't pulled the valve cover to get to the valves. That will be a while, anyway. Based on how easy it is to strip for trackdays, I would expect to find that most of the bike is very logical and well laid out for maintenance. Wheels are no harder to pull than they are on any other DSSA bike.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for taking the time to give me the skinny...

[ This message was edited by: TeddaGreek on 2006-12-12 06:41 ]
 

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On 2006-12-11 22:12, Will wrote:
3. The quickest stopping bike Motorcycle Consumer News ever tested was a Speed Triple. The complaint that people have [with the Speed Triple Brakes] is the lever feel, not how fast it stops.
Will, I agree with everything you say except this. The problem with the S3 brakes is air in the lines. However, this only affects the earlier '05 models (like mine, for example). I have had NO such issues with the D675's brakes.

As far as TeddaGreek's questions, sorry to hear about your accident, but it sounds like you're on the mend. Basically, there is no substitute for a test ride. I like the 675 a lot, it is a very easy and fun bike to ride, but it is a little bike. And at 250lbs, you might also want to check out a 10R or R1. Good luck!
 

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if ya like the 675 then get it....i am 240 and it wheelies easy in 1 and 2. i ride my friends all the time....heck i just gave it back after having it for over 2 weeks...i love my 955 for its comfort though...get a 955 before u get a R1 or a 10R... its a cheaper bike and way more fun on longer rides...
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi Gents-

Thought I would throw in my 2 cents here....Being a larger fellow of 6'5" 245 I have long been resigned that they don't quite make sport bikes with me in mind. However, Having gotten over that and having owned several sport and race bikes, the 675 is a pleasant surprise. Ergonomic wise, I have found the 675 quite comfortable. Being taller I find less of an effort to reach the bars then most but more of a challenge to get the pegs/pedal angles optimum for performance and comfort. My first mod on almost any are rear-sets and really find it essential for feeling "planted" as a larger rider. Just put a set of CFM/Woodcrafts on the new 675 and have been very pleased. Compared to my K3 GSXR-750 or my K2 GSXR-1000 I feel it is a lot less cramped and easier t transition Left/Right and around the tank. This coud very well be due to the fact that the 675 is more narrow than almost anything out there other than a 2 stroke.

Power wise, I have always favored the "usable mortal" powerband of a 750. Plenty to drive hard out of exits but not enough to launch you instantly into oblivion like a modern 1000. There is always that in the back of your mind, for those of us who aren't Doug Chandler, I have founf that a lot of my lap times have been the best on the 750 even though moving faster in places on the 1000. All that beeing said I find the exit power very similar to a 4 cylinder 750 with a little lmore power starting a little earlier in the powerband and maybe a little more linear with less punch at the top like a 4. Like many of the folks stated earlier, the 3 is a great blend of a 2 and a four....some of the earlier torque and some of the peak power. For my riding style and confidense it seems a lot more usable and there is plenty of it even being my size.

Another aspect that I really liked about the 675 that I read here and other sites was that the 675 is sprung relatively heavy for a stock sportbike. I am a little heavy for the springs but not my much even on the track. I think you can go a long way with the stock suspension even as a larger rider by just getting the preload/sag/dampening set according to recommendations (track side providers like Dave from Catalyst Reaction are awesome at this and very reasonable...well worth it)

Honestly, nothing but great things to say about the 675. I love my liter bike...but I am tired of going through tires faster and find the 675 more confidense inspiring at my level.

Hope this helps!

T
 

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My first mod on almost any are rear-sets and really find it essential for feeling "planted" as a larger rider. Just put a set of CFM/Woodcrafts on the new 675 and have been very pleased.
I'm 6'3'' tall and thought the first mod to consider on a D675 would be handlebars raisers. I was wrong then?
 

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On 2006-12-25 17:51, Max_NYC wrote:
My first mod on almost any are rear-sets and really find it essential for feeling "planted" as a larger rider. Just put a set of CFM/Woodcrafts on the new 675 and have been very pleased.
I'm 6'3'' tall and thought the first mod to consider on a D675 would be to raise the handlebars. Offset the peg controls is more important then?
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
As far as being planted on the bike...Aftermarket rearsets are more sturdy/less flimsy compared to the stock pegs. Also, I tend to roll my inside foot out a bit as the ball of my foot is planted on the peg. I have never felt very stable on any stock pegs vs rearsets. Ideally, the rider should be planted on the bike using legs and knees while arms remain relaxed for smooth input and not upseting the bike trying to hold yourself on. Being larger than most "ideally sized" riders being planted securely on the bike is paramount for me to relax on the bike and focus on whats in front of me. This is why I always start with rearsets...just my 2 cents.

I should mention that this may be more of an issue in how you are going to spend the majority of your riding. I tend to set my sportbikes up for performance/track riding because that is where I use them the most. If I were commuting or doing a lot of touring I probably would be less concerned about things like rearsets...but if that was the case the 675 would not be my first choice (I would stick with something like a speed triple...better on the street as far as comfort and still a lot of fun on the occasional trackday)
 
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