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I have a few questions about a '04 Daytona 600 which has been sitting in my garage for almost a year.

When I went to start it up after putting it back together and fueling it up, I noticed the "check engine" light is on.
This was on before it was repaired in my garage. I have done nothing to the engine or the electrical system. All I did was put panels back on.

Is there a way to reset it like pulling certain fuses and turn the key to run like it can be done on a car?


Sometimes when the bike is leaned over standing on the kickstand, the low oil light came on and the engine wouldn't start. Where can I check the oil level?
I think it's the dipstick by the clutch housing on the right side but want to make sure that's oil and not transmission or clutch fluid.

I also get this message "LO TEMP", I'm not sure if this is related to the oil temp or the coolant temp.

Also when I tried to ride it out of the garage, I kicked the shifter down into gear with the clutch depressed, I feel the bike engaging then the engine stalls, tried it a few times and still the same result...does the clutch cable need to be adjusted?

Thanks in advance...
 

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If the Daytona 600 is like the other Triumph 600's then:

-You should have 2-3 mm play with the clutch lever. There is a kill switch in the sidestand, the engine will shut off if you put the bike into gear with the sidestand down, that's probably what's happening.

-LO TEMP means that the coolant temp is low (but the oil temp will be low likewise)

-The tranny & clutch share the engine oil for lubrication (only one dipstick for all), so please check the oil level before starting her up again, then get that year old oil out and some fresh oil in ASAP

Where in NY are you? Sounds like you need some help. I'm in Yonkers and can help you get her going if you are in the neighborhood.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I did have the kickstand down the whole time. I was trying to ride it from the garage to the shed but now I know.

When I checked the dipstick, it was in the crosshatch, the oil was changed about 7-8 months ago until the bro went to college and didn't have time to work on it.

I'm in Pleasantville, NY.

Thanks for the info.

I'm going to borrow a OBD II scan tool and hopefully that will let me read and clear the code(s) that's stored in it.
 

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Your Daytona has Keihin injection, and definately doesn't have OBD II. The only ways that I am aware of to read/clear codes on our bikes is the dealer or with Tuneboy software.
 

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If the battery went dead or was disconnected for any time the check engine light will stay on until the bike goes through 3 full heat cycles, or at least that's what happens with the Speed 4 (maybe someone on the forum with a Daytona 600 can answer for sure). I wouldn't worry about it unless it stays on after the 3 cycles (needs to heat all the way up and cool all the way down).

Looks like we are neighbors. I'm not familiar with your exact model but it's probably very similar to the S4 and I've been wrenching on bikes for almost 20 years. If you need any more help let me know, I can stop by and help you if needed.
 
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On 2006-12-08 15:28, vitabrew wrote:
If the battery went dead or was disconnected for any time the check engine light will stay on until the bike goes through 3 full heat cycles, or at least that's what happens with the Speed 4 (maybe someone on the forum with a Daytona 600 can answer for sure). I wouldn't worry about it unless it stays on after the 3 cycles (needs to heat all the way up and cool all the way down).

Looks like we are neighbors. I'm not familiar with your exact model but it's probably very similar to the S4 and I've been wrenching on bikes for almost 20 years. If you need any more help let me know, I can stop by and help you if needed.
That what it was. I ran it through a full heat cycle and the light went away after the 2nd cycle.

Anyways the bike will be ready for sale in 2 weeks. Should I sell it now or wait til the spring which will sell easier?

It only has 875 miles on it, everything is up to date including oil change, oil filter, coolant change, a new battery.

The blue book for this bike is about 5-6 grand. How should I go about selling it?
 
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Just to make sure ; the oil level should be checked with the bike upright i.e. not on the kickstand. If the level is just up to the hatched area when its on its stand then its too low.
 

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On 2006-12-07 19:38, 777ER wrote:
I have a few questions about a '04 Daytona 600 which has been sitting in my garage for almost a year.

When I went to start it up after putting it back together and fueling it up, I noticed the "check engine" light is on.
This was on before it was repaired in my garage. I have done nothing to the engine or the electrical system. All I did was put panels back on.

Is there a way to reset it like pulling certain fuses and turn the key to run like it can be done on a car?


Sometimes when the bike is leaned over standing on the kickstand, the low oil light came on and the engine wouldn't start. Where can I check the oil level?
I think it's the dipstick by the clutch housing on the right side but want to make sure that's oil and not transmission or clutch fluid.

I also get this message "LO TEMP", I'm not sure if this is related to the oil temp or the coolant temp.

Also when I tried to ride it out of the garage, I kicked the shifter down into gear with the clutch depressed, I feel the bike engaging then the engine stalls, tried it a few times and still the same result...does the clutch cable need to be adjusted?

Thanks in advance...
BWAHAhahahahhahahahahahahahahhahahha You don't need advice dood, you need a bicycle.
 
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On 2006-12-26 21:01, mdgore wrote:
BWAHAhahahahhahahahahahahahahhahahha You don't need advice dood, you need a bicycle.
what the hell...I don't own this bike, in fact i don't have a motorcycle license and I'm trying to finish it up so I can sell it.

BTW I work on jets for a living...
 

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On 2006-12-26 21:09, 777ER wrote:
On 2006-12-26 21:01, mdgore wrote:
BWAHAhahahahhahahahahahahahahhahahha You don't need advice dood, you need a bicycle.
what the hell...I don't own this bike, in fact i don't have a motorcycle license and I'm trying to finish it up so I can sell it.

BTW I work on jets for a living...
Hmmmm you don't even know how to check the oil level and you're "trying to finish it up so I can sell it". When you get it all together, take it to a competent MC mechanic and have them check it out. After sitting for that long there are way too many things that could be out of sorts, making the vehicle unsafe to operate. Especially if it wasn't stored properly, which seems to be the case. Just because you work on jets, doesn't mean you understand what it takes to make a motorcycle safe for operation.
 

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On 2006-12-26 23:30, mdgore wrote:


Hmmmm you don't even know how to check the oil level and you're "trying to finish it up so I can sell it". When you get it all together, take it to a competent MC mechanic and have them check it out. After sitting for that long there are way too many things that could be out of sorts, making the vehicle unsafe to operate. Especially if it wasn't stored properly, which seems to be the case. Just because you work on jets, doesn't mean you understand what it takes to make a motorcycle safe for operation.
Dude, if you're gonna cop an attitude like that on a guy who came here looking for some serious advice, go buy a friggin harley. 777ER never said he was a moto expert, and certainly never said he was the 4th Hayden brother, so quit treating the guy like he's asking totally stupid questions. From what i read in the original post, all of them are valid questions that any rider not versed in metric bikes might have.

[ This message was edited by: SpiritZeroThree on 2006-12-29 02:00 ]
 

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OK, back to the questions after we have had our little attitude adjustment.

If you take the bike up to temperature three times, the check engine light should turn off. If it doesn't, you have a problem that you need to get checked.

The dead battery can make the engine light come on.

I would start the reawakening by draining the oil and putting new oil and a new filter on the bike. The bike's engine and transmission oil are the same. There is no hydraulic fluid for the clutch, since it is a simple mechanical cable. You can adjust that using a fitting at the lever end of the cable. It screws in and out of the lever perch, with a thumb wheel that works as a jamb nut to keep it in place.

You should be able to remove the oil filter without removing the bodywork, but it is a pain in the butt. The fairing lowers come apart using a 5mm allen head wrench. The drain plug is at the lowest part of the engine- you should be able to find it pretty easily. If I remember right, it has a 13mm hex head.

If you don't want to pull the gas tank off and drain whatever fuel is in there out, I would put a bottle of Techron or some other injector cleaner in the fuel to get some of the crud out of the engine. I would do that in each tank of fuel for the next couple tanks you run through the motor. I would not run it hard for a while, since there are probably ridges of coagulated crud inside the motor that will cause problems until they burn off or wear off.

If it has been inside a garage for a year, but no more, then it is probably mostly fine. When you go to sell it, the best thing to do is get it running as well as you can, but disclose what you did to the potential buyer. I don't know if you will get a better price with it reawakened or not- you might try to sell it as is and let the new owner figure out what he or she wants to do with it. That is a cost/ benefit analysis that I cannot do for you for a number of reasons.

With the mileage on it, it is practically a new machine, mechanically. You don't say what kind of shape the bodywork is in, but if it is prisine, you will get a bit more for the bike. Check Motorcycle Consumer News for their annual guide to used bike values. Triumphs do not hold their value as well as some others, so I would expect Blue Book to be a bit high. That may change in time, but for now, used Triumphs go for a bit less than used Japanese 600s. Check the local classified ads to see what other 600s are going for and call around to motorcycle dealerships about two to three year old 600s. That will give you a better idea of what a 600 is worth where you live than we can over the internet.

Who knows, once you get it runing, you may find that you have to keep it!

[ This message was edited by: Will on 2006-12-29 10:55 ]
 

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Sorry people, you want to suck up to this guy fine. But if he doesn't even know where to check the frickin oil at, that bike needs to gone over by someone who knows what they're doing when repairing motorcycles. Oh, it's just been sitting around for a year so it should be ok. What a bunch of BS. You people are clueless.

What if he sells that bike to noob, who shakes his head yeah yeah, cool thanks for telling me it was wrecked. Then he jumps on and proceeds to do what all noobs do. Whack the throttle grab a handle full of brake and hope he doesn't eat pavement. What if the brakes are seized? What if the cables haven't been lubed and are rusting and frayed? Are the tires inflated properly? Is the chain still pliable and adjusted properly? Was the axle nut set at the proper torque? The fricking list is endless, yet you are all more than ready to think that because this guy works on jets (which have dick all to do with internal combustion engines) he can professionally repair and prep a motorcycle that's been wrecked, and sitting in his garage for a year.

Note to self: never buy a bike from these wankers.
 

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Easy man, easy. As long as he tells a prospective buyer about the situation (and he's given us no reason to think he won't) their stupidity is on them. It's called natural selection, and it is alive and well in the motorcycling world. If some squid is gonna paste himself into a tree because he can't handle basic maintenance & safety checks, he's going to do it on any bike you hand him.

One of the things I like most about this board is the fact that people don't jump down newbies throats' when they ask for help. So let's keep that alive. We were all newbies at one time (even you, mdgore).

mdgore - I hope you never have to go on a jet engine forum and ask for help :razz: .



[ This message was edited by: rustbucket on 2006-12-31 08:15 ]
 
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On 2006-12-29 10:50, Will wrote:
If you take the bike up to temperature three times, the check engine light should turn off. If it doesn't, you have a problem that you need to get checked.

The dead battery can make the engine light come on.
I did that and the check engine light did go off after the 2nd time. It was the dead battery. I have new Deka battery in it right now.

I would start the reawakening by draining the oil and putting new oil and a new filter on the bike. The bike's engine and transmission oil are the same. There is no hydraulic fluid for the clutch, since it is a simple mechanical cable. You can adjust that using a fitting at the lever end of the cable. It screws in and out of the lever perch, with a thumb wheel that works as a jamb nut to keep it in place.
Just like the Yamaha ATV is the same way. I asked my bro about the clutch cable since he came home for the weekend, he said it's good and no adjustment is needed.

It was the kickstand that I left down which engaged the interlock to shut the engine off if I shift it into gear and release the clutch. I attempted to move it out of the garage to the driveway with the kickstand down since it was short and didn't expect to go higher than 1-2 mph.

After finding that out, I did put the kickstand up and the engine stayed running as it should.

You should be able to remove the oil filter without removing the bodywork, but it is a pain in the butt. The fairing lowers come apart using a 5mm allen head wrench. The drain plug is at the lowest part of the engine- you should be able to find it pretty easily. If I remember right, it has a 13mm hex head.
Already did that when the front fairing panels were off the bike, yes it's a PITA with the filter between the headers. You'd have to be careful not to burn yourself if the bike is warm for the oil change.

If you don't want to pull the gas tank off and drain whatever fuel is in there out, I would put a bottle of Techron or some other injector cleaner in the fuel to get some of the crud out of the engine. I would do that in each tank of fuel for the next couple tanks you run through the motor. I would not run it hard for a while, since there are probably ridges of coagulated crud inside the motor that will cause problems until they burn off or wear off.
I already installed a new fuel tank and even replaced the fuel filter on the pump before doing a leak check and installing the tank.

If it has been inside a garage for a year, but no more, then it is probably mostly fine. When you go to sell it, the best thing to do is get it running as well as you can, but disclose what you did to the potential buyer. I don't know if you will get a better price with it reawakened or not- you might try to sell it as is and let the new owner figure out what he or she wants to do with it. That is a cost/ benefit analysis that I cannot do for you for a number of reasons.
Yes it has been inside the climated controlled garage for a year, since my bro has been busy with college and has no time to do anything with it. Which I what I took up upon.

The bike is in very good condition... I had a experienced rider drive it to check it out for me and he said nothing is wrong with it. No vibrations from the front or rear wheels. It handles good.

Before he left the driveway, I told him "you crash it, you brought it", lucky he brought it back in one piece.

With the mileage on it, it is practically a new machine, mechanically. You don't say what kind of shape the bodywork is in, but if it is prisine, you will get a bit more for the bike. Check Motorcycle Consumer News for their annual guide to used bike values. Triumphs do not hold their value as well as some others, so I would expect Blue Book to be a bit high. That may change in time, but for now, used Triumphs go for a bit less than used Japanese 600s. Check the local classified ads to see what other 600s are going for and call around to motorcycle dealerships about two to three year old 600s. That will give you a better idea of what a 600 is worth where you live than we can over the internet.

Who knows, once you get it runing, you may find that you have to keep it!
I don't have a motorcycle license and I own 2 cars, worked on 10 different cars in the family.
Due to the accident my bro has, he has been talked out of riding another motorcycle again on the street and that it's not worth the risk here with crazy drivers here in NY (metro area) he has gotten a diesel jeep.

I checked the bluebook and it's a estimated 5 grand for it. It has under 900 miles on it. I'm going to try to see if the dealer my bro brought it from would buy it.

The only parts that has been replaced is the rear sub-frame (where the tail bodywork mounts to, ie taillight, rear blinkers, rear seat cover, etc. The rear fairing, fuel tank, front upper and lower fairing, front headlight housing, intake piece for the front, front wheel/tire, side blinkers. That's it.

The fork is fine, no scratches, damage or nicks. Even it has been checked for strightness. The front brake rotors has been checked with a dail indicator and it's true. No warp or bends or out of alignment.
 
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On 2006-12-30 23:57, mdgore wrote:
Sorry people, you want to suck up to this guy fine. But if he doesn't even know where to check the frickin oil at, that bike needs to gone over by someone who knows what they're doing when repairing motorcycles. Oh, it's just been sitting around for a year so it should be ok. What a bunch of BS. You people are clueless.
Excuse me, I asked a question because many different applications has different design and setups in the way they operate.

This is like buying 2 different brands of car, one car would have a oil filter on top of the engine and doesn't have a oil dipstick! Another would have a filter on the bottom and would have a dipstick too!

How about this, go and check the fluid level in the ATS, the CSD or IDG, gearbox, and the main tank. Do you think all of those use the same type of fluids?
And where would you find the dipstick or fill bolt for each application?
Some are not even in view until you look for it.

What if he sells that bike to noob, who shakes his head yeah yeah, cool thanks for telling me it was wrecked. Then he jumps on and proceeds to do what all noobs do. Whack the throttle grab a handle full of brake and hope he doesn't eat pavement. What if the brakes are seized? What if the cables haven't been lubed and are rusting and frayed? Are the tires inflated properly? Is the chain still pliable and adjusted properly? Was the axle nut set at the proper torque? The fricking list is endless, yet you are all more than ready to think that because this guy works on jets (which have dick all to do with internal combustion engines) he can professionally repair and prep a motorcycle that's been wrecked, and sitting in his garage for a year.

Note to self: never buy a bike from these wankers.
I have no intention of passing off this bike as never wrecked. I'm sure everyone at one point in life has dropped a bike.
The bike is stored in a climated controlled garage!
You will not find rust anywhere on it. The brake ops check good and has been tested with no problems. Even passed the inspection!

As for the buyer, I have no control on what he/she will do. They will take the responsibilty for their own actions.

The cables aren't even frayed, it has under 900 miles on it!

Are you kidding me about the tires? I gave everything a checkover for the obivious stuff including tire pressures. Even the bro checked the chain and it's well lubed before and after.
I have cans of chain lube and wax in the garage which the bro used on it.

Why do you think I have a torque wrench...

I have repaired planes that have been hit in the wing from a fuel tanker truck,
and the fuselage from the ***** rampers running a truck into it and bumping it with the baggage loader.
There are lives on the plane and it relies on the safe & proper repair, it could be you or your family flying on it...

Maybe you belong on the no fly list mdgore.
 
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On 2006-12-31 08:12, rustbucket wrote:
Easy man, easy. As long as he tells a prospective buyer about the situation (and he's given us no reason to think he won't) their stupidity is on them. It's called natural selection, and it is alive and well in the motorcycling world. If some squid is gonna paste himself into a tree because he can't handle basic maintenance & safety checks, he's going to do it on any bike you hand him.

One of the things I like most about this board is the fact that people don't jump down newbies throats' when they ask for help. So let's keep that alive. We were all newbies at one time (even you, mdgore).

mdgore - I hope you never have to go on a jet engine forum and ask for help :razz: .
That is true. It's everywhere.

A jet engine forum is very rare for commerical aircrafts, most of the support is done via the engine manufacturer and it's part of the engine deal when you lease or purchase them.
Or from the airline's powerplant engineering dept...
 
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