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Discussion Starter #62
cheerfulljerry, if you've never splinged a tyre in a muddy gateway, up a lane, in the pouring rain, under a hail of shot and shell, you ain't lived!
Splinging is for winners!
Edited to add, inability to read maps helps.
Dear sir, being brought up in the countryside I have done many a thing in a gateway, not always legally I might add, but I can honestly say that I've never splinged a tyre in any gateway wether it be muddy or not. :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #63
Ok since you asked -
You have got to be kidding.... "one of life's great pioneers, a true revolutionary?" --- Come on, get real.
I wrote the comment saying that the first person to use a car tyre on a motorcycle should be classed as a pioneer purposely to gain a reaction. In Great Britain, yes I still believe we are great, the term 'redneck' is seen as being derogatory, meaning that one is implying that someone is a bit thick or stupid. Just because one doesn't agree with someone else's views or something they have done one shouldn't result to name calling. This all seems very childish to me, I thought motorcyclist's were better than that! they always used to be. Everybody does things differently, If we all played by the rules all of the time life would be very boring and somewhat pointless, North Korea springs to mind.
Fair play to the chap who thought of fitting a car tyre to a motorcycle, the idea obviously worked ok because there are a great many riders doing it with from what I can make out a great success rate.(y)

Lets make Brexit great again!
 

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I've seen some vicious flame wars erupt over this topic, which really IS dumb. Eventually, those in favour will dismiss those opposed on the basis that they "haven't tried it", while those opposed dismiss those in favour on the basis that "it's dangerous and doesn't work." They exchange volleys of YouTube videos and eventually it all descends into misery and abuse.

I think darksiding is fundamentally an economic decision, and therefore nobody ought to judge it. In an argument over theory, those in favour can never win. But in an argument over the cost of motorcycle tires, those opposed should probably mind their own.

And I say that as someone who wouldn't dream of doing it.
 

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Dear sir, being brought up in the countryside I have done many a thing in a gateway, not always legally I might add, but I can honestly say that I've never splinged a tyre in any gateway wether it be muddy or not. :rolleyes:
OK Matey, seeing as you're an expert on gateways, tell me this. Why do they always put the gate in the muddy part of the field, eh?
 

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This is the most tame darkside thread I have ever seen. Heck, we even mixed in some grammar nazi stuff and still are rolling along relatively unscathed!
Wow, this is creepy. I got a spray off a fellow Aussie on another thread for a fairly lame quip and now this.
I switched over to the forum's new "Dark Mode" a couple of days ago.
I had no idea it was a covert link to the Dark Web. Switching back to Light Mode now before the forum meisters knock on my front door. Mulder, Scully I got a job for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #70 (Edited)
OK Matey, seeing as you're an expert on gateways, tell me this. Why do they always put the gate in the muddy part of the field, eh?
Right my good fellow I've a done a small amount of research on this subject and I mean small. In the mid 1930's a crime wave was sweeping across the western hemisphere starting in the good old US of A and spreading as far down as northern Europe, as it transpires good people, as with the likes of me and your good self were found to be tyre splinging in farmers gateways, it was originally spelt 'tire splinging'. Governments throughout the land made it mandatory to have all gateways moved to muddy areas to try and combat this wave of tire splinging, the idea was that people did not want to dirty their clothing whilst partaking in the practice, you see in the early 20th century it was seen to be an unhealthy pastime, these days the practice has become more acceptable and not punished so harshly. Some farmers were defiant and you still come across gateways that were not moved, these often have a concrete or tarmac (asphalt) entrance, possibly because the farmers in question were practicing tyre splinging themselves but this has yet to be proven.
Now jumping forward a few years to the onset of the second world war, Adolf Hitler noticed this tire splinging epidemic sweeping across the western world and jumped on to the opportunity to use it as a weapon against the allies, he set up a little known Nazi special deployment force called the 'NTST' (Nazi tire splinging troop) they were part of the pansy division, made up mainly of farm workers who had no problem with getting down and dirty. These soldiers were an evil bunch of renegades and there have been undocumented stories saying that if someone were unfortunate enough to come into contact with a Nazi tire splinger, commonly referred to as a 'Spling Nazi', then they would be 'Sprayed'.

A warning from history one thinks.

Anyway my good fellow have a fine day and lets get Brexit done!
 

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The squared off rear tyre that went with the Avon Speedmaster front was the Avon SM, which I'm assuming stands for Speed master. You can still buy them!!!!

 

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Discussion Starter #73
The squared off rear tyre that went with the Avon Speedmaster front was the Avon SM, which I'm assuming stands for Speed master. You can still buy them!!!!

Christ that's 72 quid! you could almost get two car tyres for that price. I can quite clearly recollect that these tyres had a bad rep but then I am thinking back to the late 70's when men were men and sheep wore disguises, I've done a lot of weird s**t since then man. I mean if your going to fit a square section Avon Speedmaster tire to yer motorcycle then you just as well fit a car tyre, but who would do a crazy arsed reckless thing like that these days?
 

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Right, my Triumph America's got wire wheel rims which I believe are MT-type, the rear being 15", a lot of classic 'roadster' cars also have wire wheel rims, now if these rims are MT type you can easily pick up 15" tyre's for classic cars that are radial's but are designed to look like old schooly crossply's, which is my thing. As far as stresses and strains on sidewalls go, a classic Jag E-type or big Austin Healey 3000 weighs in at about 1300kg and my little old Triumph America is only a mere 225kg'ish. So I'm sure that if you can throw a big old classic car into a bend at upwards of 60mph, the car tire's sidewall should be able to handle the stresses of my Triumph in a corner. I just need to do a tad more research on what type of rims classic car wire wheels have.

Peace out, Jerry
Jerry, double check this to confirm (I feel I've seen this cited multiple places around the internet), but my understanding is that 17" m/c wheels at least have the same outside rim diameter as automotive 17" wheels (though a slightly different bead profile), but 15" motorcycle wheels/rims are a larger diameter than automotive, and the 15" automotive tires can not physically be fitted to a 15" motorcycle rim without damaging the bead (or first re-machining the OD of the m/c wheel to match the diameter of the automotoive wheel).
 

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Discussion Starter #75
Jerry, double check this to confirm (I feel I've seen this cited multiple places around the internet), but my understanding is that 17" m/c wheels at least have the same outside rim diameter as automotive 17" wheels (though a slightly different bead profile), but 15" motorcycle wheels/rims are a larger diameter than automotive, and the 15" automotive tires can not physically be fitted to a 15" motorcycle rim without damaging the bead (or first re-machining the OD of the m/c wheel to match the diameter of the automotoive wheel).
Thanks for that, not something I had thought of but I'll definitely have to look into it. My plan is to get hold of a 2nd rear rim to do some experimenting with, I'm not just going to ram a car tyre on and hope for the best. So the more info I can get now the better. The weathers getting quite manky over here now and at the end of december I'll be taking my bike off the road for a couple of months, this'll give me some titting around time.
Cheers, Jerry
 

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Fairly short snippet from a post over on goldwingfacts (at least short compared to the full length of the post...):

https://www.goldwingfacts.com/threads/design-differences-between-car-and-motorcycle-rim-tire.400426/ said:
The Bead Flange (the area of the rim where the bead of the tire seats against the side of the rim)
Car Rim 17.5mm (.689")
Motorcycle Rim 14mm (.551")

The Bead Seat (the area where the tire sits on the rim in between the bead flange and the bead hump. The bead hump is what helps keeps the bead of the tire against the flange of the rim)
On a Car Rim it is 21mm wide with a 5* positive slope.
On a Motorcycle Rim it is 16mm wide with a 5* positive slope.

The lower inside corner of the rim where the bead flange and bead seat meet for the bead to interlock the tire in to the rim also known as the bead lock (the respective tire will have a matching size radius):
On a Car Rim it has a 6.5mm (.256”) Radius
On a Motorcycle Rim it is 2.5mm (.098”) Radius

The outer bead flange radius (the top outer edge of the rim):
On a Car Rim it has 9.5mm (.374”) radius
On a Motorcycle Rim have both a 12.5mm (.492”) and a 3mm (.118”) Radius

Rim Diameters (Tolerances: For Motorcycles +/- .015" For Cars +/- .04")

15"
CT 14.968"
MT 15.08"

16"
CT 15.968"
MT 15.978

17"
CT 17.189"
MT 17.08
I've been curious to do it myself, and if I end up putting a sidecar on one of my sportier bikes that runs a 180/55-17, I'll probably try out a car tire on the back. Otherwise I have no real reason to do it, but I did consider it briefly when I had my Yamaha Venture. My thought was to take one of the cast 15" rears off the Vmax and have the profile completely re-machined to match the car wheel profile, but I could never really find a 15" car tire of suitable width and height that it would not require major surgery on the swing arm, and with a shaft drive, it just wasn't something I really wanted to mess with that much.
 

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Discussion Starter #77
Fairly short snippet from a post over on goldwingfacts (at least short compared to the full length of the post...):


I've been curious to do it myself, and if I end up putting a sidecar on one of my sportier bikes that runs a 180/55-17, I'll probably try out a car tire on the back. Otherwise I have no real reason to do it, but I did consider it briefly when I had my Yamaha Venture. My thought was to take one of the cast 15" rears off the Vmax and have the profile completely re-machined to match the car wheel profile, but I could never really find a 15" car tire of suitable width and height that it would not require major surgery on the swing arm, and with a shaft drive, it just wasn't something I really wanted to mess with that much.
Interesting reading, I don't think 0.12 of an inch on the diameter of a 15" rim is to much to stress about, as for all the other bead dimensions I'll have to do some serious measuring. I've plucked a couple of pic's from google to try and show cross sections of various wheel rims and just looking at the pics I cant see much of a difference between them, but again without looking at rim's in the flesh it's hard to tell.

The first pic is a standard steel car rim
715377


This is a 'MT' type motorcycle rim
715378


and lastly a 'WM' type motorcycle rim
715380


To be honest the only reason I'm looking at fitting a car tyre is purely a money saving exercise, a car tyre is about the third of the cost of a motorcycle tyre and can also last around 4 times longer. I can't see the point of doing it if I've got to shell out loads of money on rim modifications and the like.

This is another alternative that I've seen done in the past,
Something I've even considered.
 

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I don't think 0.12 of an inch on the diameter of a 15" rim is to much to stress about
I have read reports of beads being damaged during installation, specifically on the 15". I don't know if it's the bead diameter as much as the diameter on the lip of the rim, but apparently the steel cord in the bead was getting damaged and causing issues. The 15" is the only one I've heard of having issues like this though. Just a heads-up of something to research if you want to pursue it.
 

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I really wish people would stop doing this. Motorcycle tires are ROUND. Car tires are FLAT. It is physically impossible to properly corner a motorcycle with a car tire installed. This all started because some redneck somewhere didn't want to spend $200 for a new tire on his Goldwing. So, he went to Wal-Mart and threw a $40 pickup tire on it, and swore to the world you get more mileage for a quarter of ther cost.

Just don't do it. Your bike WILL NOT handle correctly.
That's the "usual" response from someone who never did it and knows nothing about it.

JJ
 
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