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Discussion Starter #1
Well, winter is truly upon us. Dark, very wet and very very windy. (Check the forecast for Scotland)

My first with the Cat and I'm even more impressed with the bike's ability to ignore pretty much everything going on around it and plough straight on.

Heavy rain and surface water - no problem, just barrel on through. Even the puddle I didn't see and hit ful on which setn water over my knees didn't shake it.

Wind - nowhere near as affected as it should be, had much worse problems with fully faired bikes

Protection - apart from the aforementioned puddle incident, I'm staying remarkably dry and clean for a semi faired bike

Headlights - they really are pish aren't they ? :razz: Dip throws too much to the side of the road and I can't see anything when a car is coming towards me, hi is OK but really need it to be on all the time. Must do that bulb and headlight relay thing.

So, Mother Nature - bring it on !!
 

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Protection - apart from the aforementioned puddle incident, I'm staying remarkably dry and clean for a semi faired bike
I agree - and not only the rider, but the bike stays remarkably clean too. Must be something to do with the height the bike is off the road and the height thsat the bodywork starts above this.

My GPZ is the complete opposite (low with low bodywork) and gets plastered in agricultural muck when ridden with earnest on the Cheshire lanes (he often comes with me) and that's the reason I'm not using it this winter.

Jon

Jon
 

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My bike seems to stay pretty clean, apart from the wheels, which look like carp after 100 miles.
So far as the headlight thing goes, I put the relays and bright bulbs in about a month ago. To be honest, I think the major benefit comes from the relays - the whiter bulbs are noticeable, but I could'nt say that they really make a difference worth shouting about.....
When it comes to crosswinds, the Tiger suffers a lot more than my '94 Daytona did - it does'nt feel anything like a planted when it starts a gale, like this morning.
Having said that, I should have bought the Tiger years ago, I've been missing out.

[ This message was edited by: Skidpan on 2006-11-21 15:17 ]
 

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Difficult to follow that last one, but I'll try!

I'm experiencing the same Scottish winter with my 06.

I had an 03 before, the first winter without the relays - I didn't know it could be fixed. Subsequent winters after relays fitted were so much better. Like you I had been using full beam a lot, no need after that except on quiet stretches with possible debris.

I got the relays fitted as soon as I bought the 06.

PS I know how many miles I get to the tank after running out last night on the A1. The warning light had come on at 169, it gave up at 205. I just pushed too far. The missus was delighted to deliver me some petrol - not!
 

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This is from one of my earlier posts; hope it helps:

The Triumphs require a relay with pin configuration Type B. (I think that this is a standard configuration in Australia;the Narva relay recommended elsewhere is Type B). Most accessory shops in the UK stock Type A, and don't realise that there is an alternative. Of course, if you're not using an existing relay holder, it doesn't matter as you just wire it according to instructions. Type B configuration is 87,85,30,86.(i.e. 87 opposite 30). This is standard for VW, Saab, Renault, Peugeot & Rover. I used Ring relays; model RLFK30.
So, the ebay advertisers are possibly right, they are selling "special" relays, but if you ask for 2 Type B pin configuration relays, and check the pin position as (87 opposite 30), you can do this conversion for £6(GBP).
:)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
On 2006-11-22 05:45, Dusty wrote:
This is from one of my earlier posts; hope it helps:

The Triumphs require a relay with pin configuration Type B. (I think that this is a standard configuration in Australia;the Narva relay recommended elsewhere is Type B). Most accessory shops in the UK stock Type A, and don't realise that there is an alternative. Of course, if you're not using an existing relay holder, it doesn't matter as you just wire it according to instructions. Type B configuration is 87,85,30,86.(i.e. 87 opposite 30). This is standard for VW, Saab, Renault, Peugeot & Rover. I used Ring relays; model RLFK30.
So, the ebay advertisers are possibly right, they are selling "special" relays, but if you ask for 2 Type B pin configuration relays, and check the pin position as (87 opposite 30), you can do this conversion for £6(GBP).
:)
Can someone translate that into English please ? :razz:
 

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Sorry.Should have included the background to my previous post. Lots of Sprint riders in Aus, so it was written with them in mind.
In short:
1) Use type B configuration relays. Type A will be energised permanently and drain your battery even when the ignition is off. You don't need "special Triumph relays"!
2) The relay holders are already on your bike. Just plug the relays in.

:)
 
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