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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I recently bought a D.I.D. O-ring chain. Little did I know until now that it takes a special KM500 riveting tool for over $100. I just binged the master links to lock it in place. Do I really need that expensive tool?

Does the X-ring use a clip on the master link? If so, why does the manual say NEVER use a chain with a clip?

I miss the simple life.
 

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X rings are better.O rings are older technology. X seal better and have less resistance. The clip type links are said to be dangerous. Not sure why since thats we had back in the day, but thats what they say. Pounding the link on isn't supposedly a good idea because it has to be done right or it can give out, and at speed a thrown chain is very dangerous to you and the bike. there are less expensive rivet tools if you look around. I used a dremel with a cutoff wheel to remove a link from the old chain and to cut the new one to the right amount of links. so you don't need an all in one tool if you have a drmel or some way to cut them. Just a tool that will rivet them in place.
 

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If you're riding the bike, and don't want to buy the riviter tool, I'd suggest stopping by a local shop and have them use their tool on it. You've already done the dirty work. It'd take them 2 minutes, though they may want to bill you an hour's labor.

Like Daz, I've run the clip-on links, even recently on my W650. However, I still needed to use an accessory that came with my riviter to slightly compress the O rings so I could slip the chain plate and clip over the pins. One thing to remember if using one of these is to make sure the closed end of the clip faces the direction of chain travel. Back in the day, I don't think there were any rivited links. Believe we called the clip on a "master link". Having said that, I do feel more secure with a rivited link.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the input. Tomorrow I have to do 500 miles so I don't want my new DID chain to come off.

I'll follow your advice and get a dealer to rivet those two links when I return and see if I should buy the rivet tool eventually or just go with a X-ring chain next time with a clip. The X-ring does sound better but not as secure.
 

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Go to www.mikesxs.com It is an XS650 Yamaha site but has chain breaker & riveter tools. They are a good price. It won't help you for tomorrow but you,we, us, me all will need one someday.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
357Bob,

Just ordered their reviter for only $14. It said it works on most DID chains.

Thanks. Just hope my chain holds up till I get it.

Take care,
John
 

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Just check it at every fuel stop. Maybe take a pair of vice grips & crimped the pin ends some more. I don't think that would be a 10,000 mile fix but it should stay on a long time.
 

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You know something - this year is my 30th year of continuous motorcycling. Want to know something else? I've never had a clip fall off a master link causing the chain to throw off and all the nasty results it might have.

I think that sometimes we just worry too much about what others say we should do or have. The bonnie is pretty mild in the horsepower stakes. I reckon a good old fashioned master link would do the job. Then again that's just my humble opinion.

Cheers,

Russ

[ This message was edited by: Ruxton on 2006-11-20 06:40 ]
 

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yeah Russ you're dead right - master links work fine, and have done for a century or so!!! Long as you set the closed end of the clip going with chain direction, as Bob says, they're as strong and reliable as the rest of the chain, and enable you easily to take it off and clean/change it whenever you fancy
 

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I'm one of those who went with a permanent link due to all i read even tho masters worked fine for me back in the day. However, back then there were no O/X rings, so i wonder of a clip link would be less safe due to the plate not being firmly against another plate like with the old chains. the plate will has some play due to the rubber possibly making the clip less stable. just a thought and i may be totally wrong. But it IS a different thing today with rubber seals between the inner and outer plates, so it may have something to do with why clip links are no longer the norm. Maybe i'll try one next time. I broke my tool the first time i used it, so it WOULD be nice not to have to buy another !
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I've done research on this by reading forums on the subject. Basically everyone says they never had problems with the clip but the rivet is more secure.

Although some admit they had their clips come off but the plate stayed on.

I guess I'll always go with the rivet but I wish I had a good reason why besides they say to.
 

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On 2006-11-19 18:10, dazco wrote:
...The clip type links are said to be dangerous. Not sure why since thats we had back in the day, but thats what they say. ...
Because they broke and the chain turned into a weapon. Back in the day I had one let loose in traffic in downtown Cleveland. The chain whipped off the back, went up and over, then whipped around and flogged me hard on the left shoulder. There was a police cruiser behind me and the officers thought it was the funniest thing they ever saw as they drove away from my now stranded Norton. I didn't wear a helmet in those days and I probably wouldn't be writing this if the chain had whipped my head instead of my shoulder. I don't miss any of that.
 

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I know why it would be dangerous if it comes off, but what i meant was i don't know why they are considered likely to come off since i owned 12 bikes in the 70's and 80's all with clip links.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
raproe and dazco,

(What funny names) It appears that the problem has happened but seems rare from the comments here and other forums.

raproe, your story is enough to scare me. I picture the chain flying off behind me and going thru someone's windshield. Although, yesterday I had a speeder pass me in a single lane OFF RAMP that I was taking higher than the speed listed. I seldom give the finger and horn but that SOB got it several times. Wouldn't you know it the wimp sped off and didn't pull over. Then another great driver pulled in front of me IN FULL VIEW as I was doing 70 mph on the hwy. For those clowns I wish my chain did come off and hit them.

Anyway, I'll stick with the rivet design.
 

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Master links work fine! Especially on the Bonnie. I'v ridden for over 42 years, and never lost a chain due to a master link. On a high horsepower bike a rivited chain is a must though. The X-ring is so low on friction it actually adds a little hp at the rear wheel.

Bonnies have such smooth power delivery a heavy duty chain is almost overkill. Enjoy the ride! Tommyturbo2
 

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On 2006-11-22 10:49, dazco wrote:
I know why it would be dangerous if it comes off, but what i meant was i don't know why they are considered likely to come off since i owned 12 bikes in the 70's and 80's all with clip links.
Master link problems were pretty common back then. Even though you never had a problem, I bet you were like the rest of us and always carried a spare link. It sure came in handy when I picked my chain up out of the street to put it back on.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
tommyturbo2,

I truly believe you and others have never had a problem, but I have to wonder about those that have. It is hard for me to believe that all that had their clips come off had them installed wrong or were riding high hp bikes.

Maybe those that have had them come off over-stretched the clip when putting them on. If I read correctly, you can buy a X-ring chain with a riveted link. That would be the way to go.
 

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From "Modern Motorcyle Mechanics", 5th edition by J.B. Nicholson, pp. 149&150:

When chain is being checked for adjustment it is always advisable, particularly on the rear chain, to examine the connecting link spring clip. On some models there is a tendency for the connecting link and clip to wear against the back of the primary chaincase. This applies particularly on some Triumphs. When this occurs the ends of the chain connecting link pins may wear down until the clip drops off, resulting in the chain coming off in service.

On some models it may be found an advantage to locate the connecting link with the clip on the inside, but here again it should be note that it does not rub on the gearbox or rear chain guard. It is wise to carry a spare rear chain connecting link and make replacement if there is any sign that the ends of the connecting link are wearing down close to the spring clip. A spring clip that is loose on the link pins should be replaced.


[ This message was edited by: raproe on 2006-11-24 10:56 ]
 

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Discussion Starter #20
D.I.D.'s web site says that if a bike came with an O-ring as original equipment, then it must be replaced with an O-ring chain.

Somewhere else it said that they advice using a rivet link.

Which makes me wonder, why even make a clip link then if there are so many precautions that have to be taken? Why advertise X-rings and X2 rings for a bike that came with O-rings as original equipment?

Silly me. I thought chains were a simple matter, until I had to get mine done.
 
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