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With the Airhawk seat, less is best (at least for my butt). I have very little air in it - I can press my finger into the Airhawk with no effort whatsoever and it goes straight to seat underneath. When I sit on it the compression over a much bigger area keeps my butt off the seat underneath but I can feel its not inflated much at all. 7 hours on the T120 with just a couple of 10 minute fuel stops are no problem (well at least not from the perspective of my butt).
 

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2008 Bonneville Black
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12,379 Posts
I didn’t even think a out spare parts. I’ll go ahead and order fuel hose and cables, the rest i can scrounge up. So far I’ve ordered new chain, airhawk seat cover, and riding pants. Left to buy is a fuel can and some highly recommended Motoskiveez . My bike is a 05 Bonnie T100 with 8100 miles on it so im hoping it will hold up? Hell I’m hoping I’ll hold up!
I wouldn't carry spare fuel line and cables with me. Not worth the space. The guys on the vintage bikes have those parts fail, but not on the modern bikes. If you're gonna carry those, might as well bring along a spare regulator/rectifier, a couple foot pegs and some spokes, those are the things that fail ;)

If you do get them, I'd just install the fresh ones before leaving. And when is the last time you replaced the battery? I'm heading out on a two week tour tomorrow and I replaced the perfectly fine battery just due to age, it was near time and I want a fresh one when away from home.

Bring a credit card and don't worry about bike failures, if it happens you'll deal with it. Keep yourself comfortable, hydrated and above all, safe. Don't push your miles farther than your mind can fully concentrate on the riding.

It ain't rocket science, really, just get out there and enjoy!
 

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Don't mess with the carbs, get a Crampbuster for the throttle, get a light color perforated summer jacket and a good rain jacket to go over when it gets cooler, thermal (merino wool or high tech) base level undergarment, underware that doesn't have seams that go over your butt bones, 100-150 miles before refueling or hydrating. The best summer undershirt I found was one a harley rider gave me, it was a thin white material that was better than anything sold as "summer" underwear because summer in one part of the country isn't the same as others. Waterproof boots help, but they will make your feet sweat and stink. Beware of getting sleepy like you're going to nod off, the droning of the motor and the heat will quickly induce it. A blue tooth enabled helmet linked to your phone is a life saver when negotiating complicated road changes, especially in high density fast moving traffic. Never hang out in a driver's blind side and NEVER think that a car will always yield with you. Slow down in the rain. Have road side assistance if you can and take some basic tools including wire and tape.
 

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Gents my plan is to ride from Northeast Florida to Costa Mesa California on an 05 Bonnie T100, any pointers on seat covers, jeans and having to adjust the carbs at higher altitudes ( Planning on riding thru Telluride Colorado) then towards Capital Reef UT then down to Costa Mesa. I know its not a direct route but I’ve got some stuff i want to see:) Oh yeah almost forgot… gonna be the hottest part of the year:(

Put a sheepskin on the front half of your seat. You will never go without in hot weather
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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2014 Scrambler
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397 Posts
A word on most cruise control devices - they are actually throttle locks, and do not function as one would expect from experience in cars. Fantastic pieces of kit, as already recommended, for relatively flat terrain. But if on rolling/undulating roads you lose speed on the way up and gain speed on the way down, so you could find yourself constantly adjusting it. Just trying to manage expectations if you've never used one.
I've never attempted to run with a throttle lock and a crampbuster at the same time. Anyone else?
 

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I wouldn't carry spare fuel line and cables with me. Not worth the space. The guys on the vintage bikes have those parts fail, but not on the modern bikes. If you're gonna carry those, might as well bring along a spare regulator/rectifier, a couple foot pegs and some spokes, those are the things that fail ;)
Spare fuel line and a throttle/ clutch cable take up no room, and I assure you a fuel line will split or leak when you least expect it. A small vise grip will hold a clutch cable together but not forever.

Good idea about putting on new ones. Gotta remember a 2005 cable has been under tension for over 15 years now.
 

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2008 Bonneville Black
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12,379 Posts
If the clutch cable is under tension when the clutch lever is out, you have it adjusted wrong.

Be happy you don't have a WC bike, you'd have to carry radiator hoses too!
 

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This is sick! How do you have your bike set up for the trip (luggage, suspension)? I am wanting to do this.
You pack what you think you need, and take off. Why would you change your suspension set up? Luggage? That’s like starting another oil thread! Look at other people’s set ups on the internet, see what you like, then see what you find available. Be patient, and don’t wait until trip time to start getting your rig together. Be prepared to purchase some items that wind up never being used. Keep it simple.

Willie and Max saddlebags and luggage are as good as they come. They’ll last the life of the bike, and if Easy Brackets makes a fitment for your bike they are not hard to fit and very easy to live with. Ghost Brackets, there are others, but an easy quick release for large luggage is invaluable. And they are secure.

A compact magnetic tank bag is indispensable.

Aerostich offers the Motofiz camping seat bag in multiple sizes. The biggest easily fit my two Speedmasters, and will fit the T120. (I can’t imagine why anyone would want a smaller one.)
 

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2014 Bonneville
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422 Posts
Starting out with brand new cables, tires, battery, chain etc. is the way to go imo, rather than carrying replacements. I would bring a couple bottles of Slime, and tools to do chain adjustments, a multimeter, a bicycle pump and some basic hand tools to tighten nuts and bolts etc. Something will definitely vibrate loose after a couple thousand miles. Try packing and repacking your gear and securing it to your bike and go for some test rides before you leave. You will find efficiencies that way and get used to handling changes from your panniers etc. The best rainjacket I ever owned was made for commerical fishermen. It was made of PVC with a fabric backing and totally not breathable but it kept me dry no matter what and could take all kinds of scrapes and snags without getting damaged. It's good to have a quart of oil in your bags in case you get a leak and need to replenish, and of course a can of WD40 is indispensable. I like to take an evening to inspect and clean every millimeter of my bike before I head out on a long tour so I know it's in top condition and no gremlins will appear when I am on the road.
 

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2008 bonneville carb
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65 Posts
You pack what you think you need, and take off. Why would you change your suspension set up? Luggage? That’s like starting another oil thread! Look at other people’s set ups on the internet, see what you like, then see what you find available. Be patient, and don’t wait until trip time to start getting your rig together. Be prepared to purchase some items that wind up never being used. Keep it simple.

Willie and Max saddlebags and luggage are as good as they come. They’ll last the life of the bike, and if Easy Brackets makes a fitment for your bike they are not hard to fit and very easy to live with. Ghost Brackets, there are others, but an easy quick release for large luggage is invaluable. And they are secure.

A compact magnetic tank bag is indispensable.

Aerostich offers the Motofiz camping seat bag in multiple sizes. The biggest easily fit my two Speedmasters, and will fit the T120. (I can’t imagine why anyone would want a smaller one.)
This is the internet mate, he said he was going so I asked him. And that is not like an oil question. But thanks for your other info.
 

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2008 Bonneville Black
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12,379 Posts
Try packing and repacking your gear and securing it to your bike and go for some test rides before you leave.
That's a real good idea. If he doesn't do it often, the OP going out for an overnight weekend trip would be smart before heading out on the big one. Nice shakedown run, make sure his kit is sorted.
 

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2012 Triumph Bonneville SE
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59 Posts
Coming in late on this one. I took my Thruxton from New Orleans to Florida, then up to Toronto, over to Chicago and back down the Mississippi to New Orleans again. Lessons learned:
1. Even in summer, it is cold in the North. Bring sufficient clothes for 10 degrees colder than whatever you are assuming the weather will be.
2. Hands will go numb. Taking a day break a few times on a long trip can really pay off on this and stiff legs/ass.
3. Stay of the interstates, do State Highways. It takes longer but is wayyyy more enjoyable and you really get to meet the people of the ares. Great diner opportunities.
4. Keep your gear as low as possible. I used two Kriega bags attached to the passenger pillion, but saddlebags would have even been better. I also used a Kriega backpack but should have use a camelback with storage. You get thirsty driving and pulling off and killing a 16 oz water just means your stopping in 30 minutes (at least for this 53 year old) to find a bathroom.
5. Have a spot or two where there is a good Triumph Dealer that you can stop and have the bike given a once over. I was lucky enough to do this by chance and they noted my chain was loose. I hadn't't really noticed but it sure drove better after it was tightened.
Me on my Thruxton on the Trip:
758166


and my current ride:
758167
 

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I have had my 05 Bonnie at high altitude in the Rockies including some 12,000 ft unpaved passes. In Colo and NM, I screw the idle mixtures in one turn and it starts, runs and idles perfectly. It is jetted for sea level. The constant velocity carb automatically adjusts for altitude for the main jets, but not the idle.
 
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