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Discussion Starter #1
Not sure if everyone knows the super glue and baking soda trick? It is the best fix ever for broken fairings from cracks to glueing seperate peices together, even glue back on broken securing tabs etc.
I have fixed so many things with this glue it is far better than plastic welding or any other glue on the planet.
For one instance, my mirror indicator was smashed into several peices and the head clean off the stem, I glued it back together with this glue and the reapaired area is stronger than the original plastic. it sands down nicely to for painting, if you are tidy enough you can permanently glue cracks in fairings without having to repaint the entire panel, just touch up the repair.
There are several methods or applications available on youtube but the best method for me is to cut back with a stanley knife either side of the crack , so there is a ' V ' shape along the length of the crack, on both sides of the fairing.
Put masking tape on the face side of the panel, this helps to hold the peice(s) together and also it prevents the super glue from running and spoiling the paintwork of the fairing have a teaspoon full of bicarconate of soda or baking powder ready then fill the rear side of the crack with super glue, be sure to fill the whole crack up to the surface then quickly cover the glued area with the bicarb, pile it on and shake it off, the curing is instant and can be sanded immediately (if desired) then turn the panel over, remove the tape and, clean up any projections of the glue then with a bit more finess this time apply the glue to the crack takning care to keep the glue on the crack only, and cover with bicarb. the joint will be raised and ready to sand.
Try it out on a couple of bits of plastic bottle or something first to get the feel,
I have said loads of money with this, no more stupid price for tatty 2nd hand parts on Greedbay!
Hope this helps someone like it did me.
 

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1998 T595 Daytona 2014 Kawasaki Ninja1000ABS
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I need to glue on a tiny fairing tab on my Ninja1000 that I broke off. My rushing and not remembering how to remove the fairing plus some bone head stupidity. I will try your method, but there is not a deep crack or well to fill up. The two pieces will join back without any spaces so don't know if the baking soda trick will work or not. I guess it's worth a try. I was going to melt the tab back on using a soldering iron. Not sure I want to create an additional V groove since the tab is so small and thin where it broke off.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I need to glue on a tiny fairing tab on my Ninja1000 that I broke off. My rushing and not remembering how to remove the fairing plus some bone head stupidity. I will try your method, but there is not a deep crack or well to fill up. The two pieces will join back without any spaces so don't know if the baking soda trick will work or not. I guess it's worth a try. I was going to melt the tab back on using a soldering iron. Not sure I want to create an additional V groove since the tab is so small and thin where it broke off.
This will do the job for sure, just cut the v groove on the unseen side if you can? The glue is stronger than the plastic and it will sand back down flush, I would say that this is a much stronger hold than melting the plasticwith a soldering iron, you could use the soldering iron to melt a nice little v groove on the rear?, get some old plastic or fairing parts and try it out, you will be impressed.
 

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Discussion Starter #5

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Discussion Starter #6
I have used Gorrilla Glue to glue small fairing tabs back on with some success, it just depends on how much pressure the tab has to put up with and also you have to hold the peice in place for ages till it sets, they say a minute but......
 

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Discussion Starter #7

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I use Plast-Aid for fixing plastic, used it to attach a broken tab from my fairing, among other fixes. It is a 2-part system, binder and solvent. When it dries, in about an hour, it is a part of the original, but stronger.. I have not had good luck with super glue, find that it deteriorates with age, seems to sublimate and instantly dissolves in acetone. (Once I put a part in a vacuum chamber that the maker "forgot" to tell me was held together with super glue. It fell apart in less than an hour. They knew it was going into a vacuum.)
 

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Wonder if it'd be strong enough for a broken pannier rail, and take the pounding of a pannier bouncing around off it? Not sure I want to test that, but finding a replacement is like looking for hens teeth.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hmm I would definately control test that load on something else before taking that knid of risk, Is the pannier rail plastic then? It is a very strong adhesive but as always it depends where the break is, and the loading.
 

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Good to know about new techniques.

Remember always to be sure of the type of plastic you are repairing.

Most motorcycle bodywork is ABS plastic, and acetone is it's solvent. To repair these body panels I've used Plastex with good results, however it's quite expensive and I regularly run out of the solution. After seeing some good videos on youtube I started using neat acetone and scraps of shredded ABS to create a "slurry". You can adjust it's consistency by the acetone ratio. I generally prime with neat acetone using a small paint brush then drip the slurry in with a wood skewer to fill any voids. Allow to cure for 3 days then test strength by bending the part at the damaged area. Sometimes it will "pop" so I repeat until no more popping or cracking. You can reinforc with fibreglass if needed. Then fill, sand, paint.

Other plastics such as polyethelene, polypropylene, urethane etc. are "greasy"plastics and don't react to most solvents. They require heat welding or special 2-part glues. I've had moderate success with heat welding some of these using my ski base repairer which allows you to melt the parent material & introduce molten filler material. I'm yet to refine this technique.
I had the air box in my Husky rebuilt by a clever fellow who had the special 2-part glue and applicator 7 years ago and it looks like it will last forever. I may have to invest....
 

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Since posting this other similar posts have popped up and I have to say this post by DaveC9428 Repairing sprint ST plastic
is the ultimate solution for ABS repairs. very clear instructions too, thanks for sharing
Ah yes, thats common with joining ABS pipes in plumping.

Not sure what material the pannier rails are - next time I'm in the garage I will dab a little acetone on a piece to see if ABS.
Good little discussion this thread!
 

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I was looking at repairing the bolt lug on my glovebox panel and it's not ABS, it's ASA which I have never messed with... WorldOfTriumph have that panel for £26.10 so I just ordered a new one.
 
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