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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was on a Ducati forum the other night and saw a post about the cost of a new Engine Control Module for a Ducati at $1200. Out of curiosity I looked at bike bandit and they quoted $1589 for my 2000 Sprint St $1643 for a 2006 Tiger and $1457 for my 2006 675. I tried to look at comparable bike from other manufacturers but the module was not listed.
It is my understanding that everything electrical goes through the module ignition, lights,gauges etc.
I believe that the mechanicals on the Triumph are 100,000
miles but how many triumphs are out there with high miles to see whats going on with the electronic reliability. A new Tiger is $10,699 so who is going to pay $1500 in 5 years if the head light won't come on. When there are a lot of bikes spare used parts are plentiful and mechanics know what to do. In six years will there be mechanics who can get a used ECu and program it or are we looking at trading these in at 20,000 to beat the issue.
 

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ECU's typical of today's industrial electronics used in aircraft, autos and motorcycles and such are not likely to give up the ghost in the long run. Electronics, especially the likes of ECU's, are likely to fail in the very near future rather than down the road. Out of all the cars with ECU's I have owned and tinkered with over the years the ECU is the one item, even when messing with them for performance gains, that just do not go bad. Other parts of the bike and the bike itself will likely be retired long before the ECU. Therefore, the ECU will be a used part to be set aside for that one person that needs it down the road.
This is definitely not an item to worry about. Now that I told you this my ECU will go out one day after the warranty is up. :razz:
 

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I agree with OKCTriple.
My car had electrical problems recently. Their diagnostic tool said ECU. BUT it wasn't. It was a door "module" that was throwing a wobbly and transfering the fault to the ECU where it was read off by the plug-in tool. So, I wonder if anyone that has has the ECU replaced has been duped because the "technician" hasn't investigated deep enough.
Personally I wouldn't "trade in" because of a fear of the ECU packing up. If it happens then a decision will need to be made. In the mean time just enjoy the bike. Mine's going strong at 40K by the way.
 

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I echo the above. I have worked in the motor trade now for 40+years and the times I have had to replace an ECU were due to someone messing about and damaging the electrics i.e charging batteries without disconnecting them first. connecting batteries the wrong way round, arc welding with battery connected etc.etc.

If your worried about the reliability of ECU's then don't ride your bike, don't drive your car, don't fly' don't sail, don't ride a bus. Enjoy what you have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the comments ....... but what's wrong with charging the battery in the bike? do you mean full charge o trickle charge like a battery tender? I've got 5 bikes hooked up to battery tenders
 

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I didn't think there was a choice. If you want a new bike its going to have fuel injection and an ECU, unless its an Indian Enfield! Can't see them going fuel injected.

I must have done about 500,000 miles in a variety of vehicles with ECUs without major problems. Even Alfa Romeo and Citroens have been OK. Worst was a BMW, but a hard re-boot always solved the problem.
 

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BATTERY CHARGING

There is no problem with charging a battery while it is still connected to the electrics of your bike provided you use the correct equipment.

Basically there are 2 types of battery charger.

1. Non-regulated. Cheap, do the job, disconnect battery, connect charger, leave for x amount of hours. On inspection you will find the acid bubbling away and gas coming out of the vents which is explosive and the battery terminal voltage has gone up to 16 volts or more. If you did not disconnect the battery from the bikes electrics then the voltage sensitive items such as the ECU will blow due to the excessively high voltage in the system.

2. Regulated chargers. Expensive compared to above but a great piece of kit. Connect charger to battery and go to bed, go to work, go on holiday it doesn't matter how long they are connected for. On your return, no bubbling acid, no venting gas, no damaged electrics. These chargers keep the terminal voltage of the battery down to its normal working voltage which is about 14.8volts maximum this is the optimum voltage that all 12 volt systems peak at.

Optimate or Accumate are two excellent pieces of kit, they do more than just charge your battery they also test the system first of all for short circuits, high resistances on terminal connections and techy stuff like deep charging, checking for sulphation, wrong polarity.

Hope this helps.
 

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BATTERY CHARGING

Disregard the nominal voltage of 14.8 in my last thread, it should have read 13.8 - 14.2 this is the reading you will get with engine running, no consumers on at about 1500- 2000 rpm dependant on battery condition and cleanliness of terminals etc. Don't worry if your voltmeter reads 13.1 or 14.00 these are your average on a good day figures. The time to worry is when the voltmeter reads as low as 12.2 or as high as 15.5.
 
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