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I just looked at this '73 Tiger, negotiating to buy it today. It has 18,000 on the clock, leaks oil badly from the front push rod tube, has some piston slap and the clutch slips. Bit difficult to see in these shots but the paint work is cracked and the front brake only works marginally.

Apart from that, it's original and she'll do up just fine. Hopefully do a deal today





 

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The Tiger is a great bike. I have a 1973 and bought it mainly on the advice of Classic Bike magazine. Years ago they used to publish buyers guides in the back of each issue. The TR7 Tiger and the Tiger cub were consistently the most regarded from the perspective of reliability, maintenance and spares availability. The single carb eliminates many headaches and makes life very simple. I upgraded mine to a JRC engineering model (PWK) that I bought from Steadfast cycle. Throw in a Pazon unit and you are good to go!
:cool:

Hi Jon.

I remember those buyers guides in Classic bike. I read them so many times that the excellent one and two line summaries of the different models is burnt into my memory! - They should definitely bring those guides back!

How long have you had the JRC? I use a Mikuni on my commando and am thinking ahead for a replacement for the Amal on my 70 TR6.

farric1
 

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I just looked at this '73 Tiger, negotiating to buy it today. It has 18,000 on the clock, leaks oil badly from the front push rod tube, has some piston slap and the clutch slips. Bit difficult to see in these shots but the paint work is cracked and the front brake only works marginally.

Apart from that, it's original and she'll do up just fine. Hopefully do a deal today

]
Great Bike Ian. I've been looking for a good one of these for a while now. Most are flogged out, The Tiger being such a reliable bike.

That's a lot of Triumph you've got there son!

You'll have to update your signature now!

Catch you for a ride next time you're both down from Sydney.
 

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In a way, although I would call it "market research" :) One thing I do not want to do is buy a bike and do so much work ($$) on it that it far surpasses the value of the bike. I have a tendency to get older bikes, fix them up, ride and enjoy them for awhile, sell them, repeat. I try to make it break even over the long haul and the goal is to learn something in the process. Combining business with pleasure if you will.

The key is to buy right. If the Tiger in mint showroom condition would be worth $4000 absolute best case and the same year Bonnie would be $8000+, I might approach these bikes very differently. I am following a couple of Tigers on eBay to see what they go for on the market for instance.

It would be great to get some reassurance though and in a way I have gotten some.

For example, if someone here said they would not touch a bike that had this amount of claimed engine work done due to potential future maintenance issues I would take that pretty seriously. No one has said that though and the amount of experience on this forum seems formidable.

Dave
Hi Dave.

I've done a few bikes up in my time and here's my twopenneth'

Get the best bike you can possibly afford. I've never found it to be cost effective to get an old bike and restore it (Compared to buying a bike that's had the work done) unless the bike is insanely cheap.

Most people that restore bikes will not include the cost of their labour in their selling price, this is where you benefit.

Folks on the forum may disagree with me here, but check it out for yourself. Get a quote for rechroming wheels (and rebuilding them), or paintwork, or a topend rebuild. Even when you do a lot of work yourself, the costs still mount.

If it's your first classic, I would definitely get the best tackle, then learn to live with it. You will also be able to ride it pretty much straightaway.

As for your choice of model, the T140 Tiger would have to be the pick of the Classic Triumph lineup from a useability aspect. Especially if you've not had a Triumph before. Here in Australia they command much the same price as the Bonneville, as people appreciate the reliability, and, let's face it, it's no slower than the T140 Bonneville.

Surely the Tiger is not worth only half the price of the corresponding Bonnie in the US? - That's madness! $4000 extra for a dubious extra amal carb seems lunacy! Get a Tiger!!!

Best of luck with your purchase

farric1
 

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Great Bike Ian. I've been looking for a good one of these for a while now. Most are flogged out, The Tiger being such a reliable bike.

That's a lot of Triumph you've got there son!

You'll have to update your signature now!

Catch you for a ride next time you're both down from Sydney.
G'day Craig,

Yes it is mine!!

Paid the bloke this morning. Needs lots of love and attention but I'm in no hurry, having now spent all my 'toy money' and I still have bills coming in for the '72 Bonnie rebuild. (Newly re-laced rear wheel should arrive today and the paint work will be delivered on Friday)
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I totally agree that it is in no way cost effective to restore an old bike. I learned that lesson. At least most old bikes. Some have significant collector value but they are like hens teeth these days. I am afraid the days of the Barn Find are over or nearly so.

However, it is possible and cost effective to bring an old bike back from near death and make it a terrific daily rider. So far that is what I am doing. I have yet to tear a bike down to the frame, but I got pretty close to that with the KZ1000. My first foray into the British engineering mind is just starting.

But I enjoy the challenge and learn a lot. I like to say I do everything twice, the second time the right way!

I became afflicted with this hobby many years ago as my house was full of family and I needed refuge. My garage! It's all mine!!! HAHAHAHA! She can have the formal dining room and the fru fru bedroom. I don't care, just step away from the tool chest.

As for the BSA, it took up residence in my garage last night at 11pm and I not sure in which direction that will take me.
 

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Hi Skidemon44,

Looks like a good project, and not too much work to get it on the road. Good luck with it, and remember if you need any help or advise you will find it here on the forum.

knowmad,
You are absolutely right, you will never make any money restoring an old bike, although I do my maths a little different. I figure that as I'm tinkering in the garage instead of eating out, drinking in the local cafe or pub, or doing other things to keep me amused the price pretty much works out the same. At least at the end you've got something to show for all your hard earned cash and not just a hangover and having to go on a diet :)

Webby
 

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Webby:

Yes, it will clean up well and the great part is it is currently road registered, which saves a lot of hassles. I can virtually sit on it and just pay the Rego when it's due and no inspection required etc.

Knowmad:

That looks like a sweet project that's all intact. Is it running?
 

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Discussion Starter #32
It does

It starts easily, second kick but the right cyl is firing intermittently. I think I might have a coil or wire issue. I haven't had a chance to mess with it. I will be able to do more with it next week.
 
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