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Hi Guys, I've just come into possesion of my first Triumph(77-Bonnie) and the clutch pull seems quite hard compared to any of my other bikes. Is there anything I could try to soften up the clutch pull?
 

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Start by lubing the cable. I always clean mine out with WD-40 then lube it with a Teflon lube such as Break-Free. Or, just put a new cable on. You should also check that the adjustments are correct on the clutch operating rod, just to be sure. You should be able to find what you need to do it on one of the old threads here. Or...you can get a manual, which you should have anyway.

Just some mindless ramblings of the "village idiot": Jim
 

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Thanks for reply Jim. Any suggestions as to which book is best for a guy like me that likes doing his own wrenching?
 

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HAYNES There cheap and useful.

most triumph's have harder clutch pull then others bike just there design. as long as everything checks out ok. you'll just have to get use to it. hell women like big muscle's:D

where at in Ohio?

akron area <==============
 

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Actually, Ohio,
I have a Haynes, a Clymer, and factory manuals, both repair and parts. They should be available from the British suppliers and restorers who do the old ones. The parts book is invaluable for its exploded views.

One can never have too many manuals: Jim
 

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Jim, how do the manuals you have compare for usefulness, in your opinion?

I would recommend the factory manuals, service and parts, as the best. If you are looking for a '63-'70 650, the '70 650 manual covers the earlier years. Aftermarket, I prefer Glenn's and Chilton's.

As I have recommended before, try your local library. You may find examples from different sources to compare before you buy.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Looks like I'll be going to the library this weekend. This bike hasn't been running in 12yrs so I need to give it a good looking over before taking it down the road.

I may not even keep this one. I just couldn't let it go to the chop shop. Its to nice of a piece of history.

Glad I found this forum and friendly folks.
Hey stewdog, looks like we're neighbors.<<<..Warren area
 

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Hi, OLD-BONNIE,

I like the factory ones the best, as they are specific to the year of bike I own. The Haynes and Clymer ones are very good, but they cover a multitude of years and I've found some very small discrepancies at times....nothing earth-shattering, but nevertheless... Sometimes I'll check one against the other just to be sure, but I'll always go back to the factory one. The factory parts book, which is an original, is an absolute God-send, especially when you forget just where that odd piece laying on the bench is supposed to go.

Gotta love those manuals: Jim
 

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Ohio,

A few things to check...

- Adjust your clutch. Do it by the book. Take your time. Do it right. This is in the manual.

- Make sure you have as few--and as gentle--bends in the clutch cable as possible. The more/tighter the bends, the harder the pull.

- There is a shoulder bolt that the clutch lever pivots around. Make sure the previous owner didn't crank down the locknut on the underside.

- Check the condition of your clutch cable. Frayed ends? Cracked old housing? When in doubt, opt for a replacement cable. The new ones are nylon lined and don't require any lubricating.

I've found that the stock T140 springs are pretty soft compared to the earlier T120 springs. Maybe the previous owner put in heavy duty after-market clutch springs.
 

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OHIO> I use a product named "Dry Slide" It comes with a needle for presice lubing area. It resists water, dirt and dust. First check adjustments of clutch then you lubricate the cable by taking all of the slack out of it and disconnect it at the cluch lever . Shake the Dry Slide untill you hear a rattle in the can. Place the end of the needle on your cable and gently squeeze. You will be amazed watching the Dry Slide run down inside the cable & no where else. Also, put some on the cable ball ends.
A friend rode his Sportster from California to Ohio. He complained that his clutch was hard to operate. We put some Dry Slide in the cable. It was no effort to pull the clutch after.
I'm in Beavercreek,near Dayton where in Ohio are you?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the info guys. I'll get myself a book and have at it this weekend.

For those who where wondering, I live in the Warren Ohio area and am within 2 miles of the PA border.
 

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If Its Still Hard After Quick Cable Lube, Etc.

You Might Have To Check Clutch Springs,pushrod (maybe Liitle Rusty) Ramp Balls,etc.
 
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