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Discussion Starter #1
I changed the clutch plates and springs. Adjusted the cable and now find that, although the outer cap plate lifts evenly when pulling the clutch lever, the rear wheel is still not rotating when in gear. Am I missing something about this?
There were some wear marks in the clutch basket grooves which I left as they were, hoping they wouldn’t be a problem. Is this the likely cause?
 

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In gear, but with clutch pulled in, wheel should NOT turn when kicking, or with engine running.

Many (most) classic Britbikes have enough internal friction that the rear wheel WILL start to turn. On some bikes it's almost as if you DIDN'T have the clutch pulled in, on others, it's just a slow spin.

Grooved basket slots can contribute to that, yes.
 

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Hi SkyGazer, I agree, things don't sound right.

What model bike do you have?

Regarding the rear wheel turning I think you mean in gear with lever pulled?? It should turn, but you may need to free clutch with kicker first.

The kicker is hooked directly to transmission gears, so it trans is in gear it kicker lever will move bike forward even if clutch lever is pulled. This is true on both 500 & 650/750.

Why did you take clutch apart, what was it doing? What plates did you get.

Rod & lever adjustment is most important. Here's short video on a good way to do it, even if you don't have click. You don't need the fancy wrench. Just make sure the adjuster screw doesn't turn as you tighten lock nut.

(60) Raber's Tech Tips: Episode #1 - Triumph Unit Twin Clutch Pushrod Adjustment - YouTube

The grooves as they get worse will prevent plates from separating. How worn? I don't have photo of a worn one that is bad enough to cause serious drag. The bad worn one, you'd never consider reusing.

Here's one with some wear, but it was still working at least decently. Twice that bad will give problems on release & often can slip as well.

Also verify the adjuster screw is not hitting plug on primary cover. Here's a photo of mine that hit from new. I shorten slot end of screw & reslot. Works good & allows keeping the thin o-ring that doesn't leak or vibrate loose. Mostly only T140 that hit. You can use grease on end of screw to be sure you are good. I like about .020" clearance. So you can build the grease up a little & check for clearance also.
 

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Regarding the rear wheel turning I think you mean in gear with lever pulled?? It should turn, but you may need to free clutch with kicker first.

The kicker is hooked directly to transmission gears, so it trans is in gear it kicker lever will move bike forward even if clutch lever is pulled. This is true on both 500 & 650/750.
Test of a properly free clutch (so you don't hurt yourself putting it in gear) is for the kicker to slip free in neutral AND/OR in gear.

...unless I'm getting old and senile, which COULD be the case...
 

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One other thing....did you forget your woodruff key when reassembling?
 

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If it’s in gear, the kickstart turns the rear wheel.
Yeef.

It's been THAT LONG!

My collection has been in storage a year and a half. Last time I rode a classic was when I took a quick test ride on my 66 more than 2 months ago.

Since I don't leave 'em in gear, I guess I'd just forgotten.

Down to just the race bike and the '67 as far as classic Triumphs now...

Sad.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
In gear, but with clutch pulled in, wheel should NOT turn when kicking, or with engine running.

Many (most) classic Britbikes have enough internal friction that the rear wheel WILL start to turn. On some bikes it's almost as if you DIDN'T have the clutch pulled in, on others, it's just a slow spin.

Grooved basket slots can contribute to that, yes.
What I was trying to do was to turn the rear wheel by hand with it in gear and the clutch pulled. Turning the rear wheel turned the engine over. I assumed this should not happen
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi SkyGazer, I agree, things don't sound right.

What model bike do you have?

Regarding the rear wheel turning I think you mean in gear with lever pulled?? It should turn, but you may need to free clutch with kicker first.

The kicker is hooked directly to transmission gears, so it trans is in gear it kicker lever will move bike forward even if clutch lever is pulled. This is true on both 500 & 650/750.

Why did you take clutch apart, what was it doing? What plates did you get.

Rod & lever adjustment is most important. Here's short video on a good way to do it, even if you don't have click. You don't need the fancy wrench. Just make sure the adjuster screw doesn't turn as you tighten lock nut.

(60) Raber's Tech Tips: Episode #1 - Triumph Unit Twin Clutch Pushrod Adjustment - YouTube

The grooves as they get worse will prevent plates from separating. How worn? I don't have photo of a worn one that is bad enough to cause serious drag. The bad worn one, you'd never consider reusing.

Here's one with some wear, but it was still working at least decently. Twice that bad will give problems on release & often can slip as well.

Also verify the adjuster screw is not hitting plug on primary cover. Here's a photo of mine that hit from new. I shorten slot end of screw & reslot. Works good & allows keeping the thin o-ring that doesn't leak or vibrate loose. Mostly only T140 that hit. You can use grease on end of screw to be sure you are good. I like about .020" clearance. So you can build the grease up a little & check for clearance also.
This is a 1962 Triumph T120R. Yes, it was in gear with the clutch lever pulled. Turning the rear wheel by hand turned the engine over. I was surprised It did that.
Kicking it over with the clutch lever pulled turns over the engine.
I changed the plates and springs because there was a hint that the clutch might be slipping and not allowing me to restart when hot So I wanted to remove that from the equation. I didn’t change the centre or the basket. In fact I now think that the restart problem was the timing slipping because a magneto stud was intruding into the timing side case and interfering with the magneto gear. I really do hope that was the problem because this has gone on long enough now 😉
Will take a look at the video soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
This is a 1962 Triumph T120R. Yes, it was in gear with the clutch lever pulled. Turning the rear wheel by hand turned the engine over. I was surprised It did that.
Kicking it over with the clutch lever pulled turns over the engine.
I changed the plates and springs because there was a hint that the clutch might be slipping and not allowing me to restart when hot So I wanted to remove that from the equation. I didn’t change the centre or the basket. In fact I now think that the restart problem was the timing slipping because a magneto stud was intruding into the timing side case and interfering with the magneto gear. I really do hope that was the problem because this has gone on long enough now 😉
Will take a look at the video soon.
Hi SkyGazer, I agree, things don't sound right.

What model bike do you have?

Regarding the rear wheel turning I think you mean in gear with lever pulled?? It should turn, but you may need to free clutch with kicker first.

The kicker is hooked directly to transmission gears, so it trans is in gear it kicker lever will move bike forward even if clutch lever is pulled. This is true on both 500 & 650/750.

Why did you take clutch apart, what was it doing? What plates did you get.

Rod & lever adjustment is most important. Here's short video on a good way to do it, even if you don't have click. You don't need the fancy wrench. Just make sure the adjuster screw doesn't turn as you tighten lock nut.

(60) Raber's Tech Tips: Episode #1 - Triumph Unit Twin Clutch Pushrod Adjustment - YouTube

The grooves as they get worse will prevent plates from separating. How worn? I don't have photo of a worn one that is bad enough to cause serious drag. The bad worn one, you'd never consider reusing.

Here's one with some wear, but it was still working at least decently. Twice that bad will give problems on release & often can slip as well.

Also verify the adjuster screw is not hitting plug on primary cover. Here's a photo of mine that hit from new. I shorten slot end of screw & reslot. Works good & allows keeping the thin o-ring that doesn't leak or vibrate loose. Mostly only T140 that hit. You can use grease on end of screw to be sure you are good. I like about .020" clearance. So you can build the grease up a little & check for clearance also.
My grooves were a bit worse than these pics but obviously didn’t worry me enough to do anything about it. Perhaps that was a mistake 😆
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi SkyGazer, I agree, things don't sound right.

What model bike do you have?

Regarding the rear wheel turning I think you mean in gear with lever pulled?? It should turn, but you may need to free clutch with kicker first.

The kicker is hooked directly to transmission gears, so it trans is in gear it kicker lever will move bike forward even if clutch lever is pulled. This is true on both 500 & 650/750.

Why did you take clutch apart, what was it doing? What plates did you get.

Rod & lever adjustment is most important. Here's short video on a good way to do it, even if you don't have click. You don't need the fancy wrench. Just make sure the adjuster screw doesn't turn as you tighten lock nut.

(60) Raber's Tech Tips: Episode #1 - Triumph Unit Twin Clutch Pushrod Adjustment - YouTube

The grooves as they get worse will prevent plates from separating. How worn? I don't have photo of a worn one that is bad enough to cause serious drag. The bad worn one, you'd never consider reusing.

Here's one with some wear, but it was still working at least decently. Twice that bad will give problems on release & often can slip as well.

Also verify the adjuster screw is not hitting plug on primary cover. Here's a photo of mine that hit from new. I shorten slot end of screw & reslot. Works good & allows keeping the thin o-ring that doesn't leak or vibrate loose. Mostly only T140 that hit. You can use grease on end of screw to be sure you are good. I like about .020" clearance. So you can build the grease up a little & check for clearance also.
The notching on the grooves of the basket in this video are worse than on my bike 😆
 

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Hi SkyGazer, Pre unit motor. Pre unit has different stacking sequence of plates.
Pre unit is steel plate first, while unit is friction plate first.
Both have steel plate last. Finally pressure plate pushes on last steel plate.
Do you know what plate was installed first?
I doubt grooving is your root problem since you say it’s not much worse than mine.
Since old clutch released the problem should be fairly simple to resolve. Did all the plates slide in freely?
Don
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hi SkyGazer, Pre unit motor. Pre unit has different stacking sequence of plates.
Pre unit is steel plate first, while unit is friction plate first.
Both have steel plate last. Finally pressure plate pushes on last steel plate.
Do you know what plate was installed first?
I doubt grooving is your root problem since you say it’s not much worse than mine.
Since old clutch released the problem should be fairly simple to resolve. Did all the plates slide in freely?
Don
A steel plate went in first and they all slid in just fine. I think I may have to take it all apart and look - after I’ve checked the adjustment again
 

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Please remember to make all adjustments with the cable disconnected st the handlebar, only reattach the cable once all other adjustments are complered.
 
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Maybe asking a silly question. Have you left a locking plate in the clutch instead of a plain plate.?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Don’t think I had a locking plate because I just swapped one set of old plates for a new set
 

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Don’t think I had a locking plate because I just swapped one set of old plates for a new set
A locking plate is a tool you would have bought. Similar to a plain plate but has the tangs of a plate and the centre on it to lock the two pieces together. If you dont have a locking plate, then that is not the problem.
 

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just read this thread - i may have missed something and apologies if i have -- but - just because the clutch lever is pulled in and the pressure plate lifts , does not automatically mean the plates are free -- IE not stuck
 
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