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Discussion Starter #1
My 06 T100 has a new trick. A clutch that is beginning to slip.

What’s the best bang for the buck kit on the market?

Do we typically need to replace the steels on these bikes?

Any kits/brands to avoid?
 

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I've had really good luck with EBC clutch kits. If you can afford it, try to replace the steels. Upon disassembling the clutch, if the steels have any discoloration at all, you will need to replace them, as they will likely be warped. But EBC should offer a complete kit with fibers, steels and springs. I can check when I get to work this morning. Not a huge fan of Barnett clutches though. I've had issues with them wearing and slipping prematurely. Of course, OE is usually the best route, but usually the most expensive as well.
 

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When my clutch started slipping at about 70k miles one day I wasn't worried. I drove VW Rabbits for years with slipping clutches. But, as it turns out I barely made it home. When mine decided to go, it decided to do so all at once. So, don't get too far from home until it's fixed :)

I put in EBC plates (CK5608), I think I reused the steel plates. Honestly I'm not sure. Normally I would replace parts like that when there's a lot of labor involved in getting to them. But, I don't think I did.

I put in heavy duty clutch springs, cause that's what real men do. But I hated them and was jealous of the soft clutch lever on wife's bike. So I took it apart and put in OEM springs. I like them much better. Manhood be damned.

Here is the iconic thread for this job: https://www.triumphrat.net/air-cooled-twins-technical-talk/107966-changing-clutch-springs-without-dumping-the-engine-oil.html
 

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My 06 T100 has a new trick. A clutch that is beginning to slip.

What’s the best bang for the buck kit on the market?

Do we typically need to replace the steels on these bikes?

Any kits/brands to avoid?
You won't know the condition of the steel plates until you strip it down, if they show any signs of discolouration then check them for warping on a sheet of glass or another flat surface, if not they should be fine to put back.
Just remember now that its slipping is the point where it's most likely to cause damage to the steel plates, sooner it's fixed the better.
Have you double checked that the lever pivot is free, that recently caused the clutch on my Thruxton to slip, it wasn't allowing the cable to return fully.
 

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How many miles are on the bike? Check your clutch adjustment, and consider the Barnett "green" springs. They're only a bit stiffer than stock and are a drop-in replacement. They fix clutch slippage for many of us.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
How many miles are on the bike? Check your clutch adjustment, and consider the Barnett "green" springs. They're only a bit stiffer than stock and are a drop-in replacement. They fix clutch slippage for many of us.


About 20k on the bike.

I checked the adjustment and it is in spec at 3mm.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
At those miles my advice may not be what you needed. You shouldn't need a complete replacement yet. Perhaps trying new springs is a better idea. Although, don't know why it started slipping at this point.


Pods, rejet, and slip on are my only mods
 

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Hard to believe that would require stronger springs to prevent slippage. It's 13 years old, maybe it's just time. @CafRacer has a good point too about making sure the cable play, etc, is OK.

When mine went it was the strangest thing. I had no hints of trouble in advance. Then one afternoon just coming out of a corner and throttling on I noticed something odd. Took me a couple more corners to realize the clutch was slipping. We were probably had another 150 miles of riding ahead of us. I wasn't worried. But before long I had to avoid throttling on at all. By the time I was getting close to home it took a very delicate throttle hand to get up a hill without spinning the clutch. About any acceleration at all and the thing would just give up. Was lucky to get home without needing a tow. Just went out that fast. When I took it apart I expected the plates to be toast, but they looked pretty normal.
 

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About 20k on the bike.

I checked the adjustment and it is in spec at 3mm.
Note you need to first set the lower adjustment nut on the clutch casing to be in the middle of the adjustment thread....it is the course adjustment. Then fine tune with the handlebar adjustment to get free play within 2-3mm.

My clutch was slipping, as evidenced by sudden rpm jumps under hard accelerations. Making the full cable adjustment as described got it back to normal...bike now has 65,000 km's on in and going strong.
 

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Check the free play as you are riding, which you can do with a couple of fingers infront and behind the clutch lever.
You may find that you have no freeplay in 3rd as you are accelerating, in which case make the adjustment at the lever for a bit more play
 
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