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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looks like my cluth is starting to go (13.5K miles).
Do I really need the centering tool to replace it?
When did yours go?
Anything I need to be on the lookout for before I get into it?
 

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Bella Corse says this on their new clutch parts:

"No modifications are required for installation, however because of the need for a special alignment tool, we do recommend professional installation by a qualified mechanic."

It never says anything about a year model.

If you ask for Randy (I think that is his name) at Lone Star, he is a wealth of knowledge on the bonnie and would answer your question.
 

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I was taking inventory last night and found this tool I bought on eBay some time ago. It's a Triumph Clutch Holding Plate PN T3880014. Forgot I even had the thing.

Mike
 

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The manual says it's part T3880014. It says it is not essential but the job can take some time without it.

On page 2-35, section 31, it tells you how to align without using the tool.

Here's info from a previous post:

Posted: 2006-10-23 05:22
Quote:


On 2006-10-23 04:59, DickBender wrote:
I have decided to upgrade the clutch with a HD Barnett job and while I'm there a set of sport handlebars.
Do I need the clutch centreing tool for this??
darcy


I can't find where I read that older Hinckley Triumphs required an alignment tool, newer ones didn't, but I did find this in the new Haynes Manual on page 2.31.
Triumph recommend the use of an alignment tool (PN T3880014) for use when rebuilding the clutch. The tool is used to align the lifter plate with the hole in the transmission input shaft, thus enabling the pushrod seat to move freely in the shaft when the clutch lever is operated. The tool is not essential, although the installation procedure can take some time without it.
Not horribly definitive, but it sounds like you could replace plates and springs without the tool, according to Haynes.

BTW - I've been running Mobil1 V Twin 20W50 for the past 11,000 miles with no slippage issues. Mobil states that this oil is designed to work with air cooled engines with a wet clutch that use a common oil sump (like our bikes).

Is there any chance you have another issue, perhaps a clutch cable that is starting to fray, causing the clutch to hang up? Just a thought.
 

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I have changed Bonnie clutches more than 500 times (world record?), the centering tool only works on the early years, they changed the design some time in 03, after that no centering tool is needed
 

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On 2006-12-30 08:29, black-bonnie wrote:
Bella Corse says this on their new clutch parts:

"No modifications are required for installation, however because of the need for a special alignment tool, we do recommend professional installation by a qualified mechanic."

It never says anything about a year model.

If you ask for Randy (I think that is his name) at Lone Star, he is a wealth of knowledge on the bonnie and would answer your question.
To save you future embarassment, his name is Jeremy.

I don't think there's a Randy at Lone Star.
 

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On 2006-12-29 21:32, MES wrote:
Looks like my cluth is starting to go (13.5K miles).
Do I really need the centering tool to replace it?
When did yours go?
Anything I need to be on the lookout for before I get into it?
Hey, MES - have you been drag racing? What caused the clutch to go out at 13k miles anyway?

Bob
 

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On 2006-12-30 10:12, sweatmachine wrote:
To save you future embarassment, his name is Jeremy.
I don't think there's a Randy at Lone Star.
Yah, Randy is in customer service, small guy with a flat top. He knows his way around. Wrenches, has raced, knows performance, etc. Good man.

Jeremy is the guy you want wrenching your Bonnie, and also does a lot of retro work on old Norton, Triumph, BSA etc.
 

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On 2006-12-29 21:32, MES wrote:
Looks like my cluth is starting to go (13.5K miles).
That sure seems quick. You do a lot of stop/go riding? I'm at 13k and not a hint of a problem. I commute, but it doesn't involve a great deal of stop/go.
 

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Yah, Randy is in customer service, small guy with a flat top. He knows his way around. Wrenches, has raced, knows performance, etc. Good man.
That's the guy (Randy) I'm talking about. Thanks for the sanity check. The time or two we talked about bikes, he sure knew a lot about the mechanics.
 

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Yah, Randy is in customer service, small guy with a flat top. He knows his way around. Wrenches, has raced, knows performance, etc. Good man.
That's the guy (Randy) I'm talking about. Thanks for the sanity check. The time or two we talked about bikes, he sure knew a lot about the mechanics.
 

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MES:

I suspect it's your clutch cable, I had to replace mine at 12K miles. The first symptom I had was I had to pull my clutch lever back about 1/3 farther than normal. I thought I needed to adjust the cable but what happened was some of the cable threads had broken away and I, being a newbie didn't look at where the cable attaches at the lever. Had I looked I'd have seen it. The wind up of the story was that I was about 11 mile s from home when (on a 90 mile ride) I pulled the clutch in at the toll booth and the lever didn't return! I made it those last 11 miles on ONE CABLE THREAD! Lucky indeed...
 

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I actually met Randy the other day, but he's fairly new, no?
I think Randy took Tim's place since I don't see Tim anymore. They have a good store there and is the big reason I'm there since I do my own servicing now. Still, I enjoy looking at the bikes and talking with the staff.

I suspect it's your clutch cable, I had to replace mine at 12K miles.
On some bike models I read a lot about clutch cables breaking. Wire rope is extremely strong, so it either has to break at a connection or caused due to fraying or being poorly routed to bend it beyond its specs.

After their initial stretch, they should not stretch anymore.
 

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On 2006-12-30, sweatmachine wrote:

To save you future embarassment, his name is Jeremy.

I don't think there's a Randy at Lone Star.
:hihi: :roflmoa2: :hihi: :roflmoa2: :hihi: :roflmoa2: :gpst: :roflmoa2: :hihi: :roflmoa2: :hihi: :roflmoa2: :hihi:
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for all the posting guys. Guess I should answer a few ?s
Hey, MES - have you been drag racing? What caused the clutch to go out at 13k miles anyway?
It's not gone yet but I think I detected some slippage.
13k does seem a little short. I figured maybe 20k but I'm hard on bikes.
I'm a lard-ass who ride the twisties. To keep the revs up I work 3-4-5th gears pretty hard. city traffic doesn't help either.

Triumph Clutch Holding Plate PN T3880014
That is the correct part#
I have the manual and read it several times but it never hurts to ask somebody that has actually done it. It seems straight forward enough.

jojje, yes I think that is a world record.
Thought I read that it was only needed on the earlier models but I wanted to ask just to make sure. Thanks for the reply.

I'll get the plates/gasket and keep them around for future use. That way when I'm sure the thing is good and spun I'll be able to get right on it.

Thanks guys.
 

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You might also just try stiffer springs, I'm almost sure your plates are still good.
I know Bonneville Performance can get you green, and super heavy red, springs from Barnett since I get them from him
 
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