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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
In case this hasn't been mentioned already, if you have a T100/T120 (Maybe others don't know) then please check the wiring loom around your head stock. I just noticed that 2 of 3 wires coming from my reg/rec have sheared off because the loom is too constricted and stretches at full lock.
Triumph are putting in a warranty claim. This is separate to the recent clutch cable recall.
I got lucky and noticed it before it sheared completely.
Cheers
 

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Hi all,
In case this hasn't been mentioned already, if you have a T100/T120 (Maybe others don't know) then please check the wiring loom around your head stock. I just noticed that 2 of 3 wires coming from my reg/rec have sheared off because the loom is too constricted and stretches at full lock.
Triumph are putting in a warranty claim. This is separate to the recent clutch cable recall.
I got lucky and noticed it before it sheared completely.
Cheers
My dealer just told me I was due for a headstock recall on a 2017 T120. It is the “headstock tidy”. I also put a JBQ 7/8” riser on. I don’t see abrasion but it tightened the clutch cable. I wonder if this caused the infamous no-hands wobble?
 

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I looked at my 2016 T120, and while moving the bars, I can see enough flexing in the wires of the left side connector that could generate eventual breakage. Especially if the wire installation was short on slack. The right side connector wires did not appear to flex at all.
The problem here (if you're out of warranty) is once those wires break, how much of the wire harness do you have to buy, and how big a headache is it to replace. Or,.... I wonder if new wire can be spliced into the connector ???
Can't help but think that the voltage regulator would have been much better off in a stationery mount somewhere on the frame, and not on the front forks.
Thanks for posting.
GEB
 

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Coincidentally I just relocated my rectifier to behind the radiator which is a much more natural position for it. There wasn't any wear on the wiring. When it was in its original position, it added to the rats nest of wiring all near the head stock and I could easily see issues if the wiring became jumbled. Moving them cleaned out a lot of the mess and seemed to help the rest of the wiring with space.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 

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Nate; Sounds like a good idea, and you might be on to something,... but are you not concerned that it might get too warm from the radiator?
I assume that finned outer shell is for a heat dissipation function.
I think it might be an interesting experiment to measure their heat output with a hand held IR thermometer, before and after.
Could you provide a photo and brief tutorial for your procedure?

Thanks,
GEB
 

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I plan to relocate the voltage regulator on my Street Cup as well. Behind the radiator seems like a good spot or I have a Tamarit "chin" fairing as well and so might try to hide it lower. Those are some pretty heavy wires that don't need to be flexing every time the forks move and taking the whole harness with them. And I usually have a lot of bar movement to get to the street.

Triumph's design was obviously to keep everything neat and tidy, in one thick bundle of wires, and using the headlight bucket for a central distribution point. Having recently wired my old 650 from scratch, I pretty much went with that philosophy except that we're talking minimal electric requirements and wires. Even so I was careful to keep what I have from binding.

For the cup I have been considering a frame mount "cafe racer" style fairing, similar to the Thruxton. Something I wanted to do anyway and having a fixed headlight will no doubt drastically reduce the harness flex. Looking at the .pdf for the Thruxton fairing install was a bit intimidating. However, now that we can pretty much conclude that Triumph is unlikely to address the problem in any meaningful way (other than to replace documented bad harnesses for the warranty period) I'm a little more encouraged to unpack that headlight and see what can be done.
 

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Holy cow. That looks terrible. I hope you are still under warranty. I would definitely take that in. It is way too early for any wires to be looking that way. Your picture looks quite a bit different from my T120, as there a no loose wires like that on my bike. They are all wrapped in light tubing right up until the plugs.

I just added cruise control to my T120 yesterday, so I used the opportunity to check out all of my wiring around the head stock, including up in the headlamp casing. Everything seems in order and all of the wiring has a lot of play in it. I'm getting the recall done this Saturday, but I don't seem to have an issue with my clutch cable causing damage either. I'll get it done anyway.
 

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Coincidentally I just relocated my rectifier to behind the radiator which is a much more natural position for it. There wasn't any wear on the wiring. When it was in its original position, it added to the rats nest of wiring all near the head stock and I could easily see issues if the wiring became jumbled. Moving them cleaned out a lot of the mess and seemed to help the rest of the wiring with space.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
You should write a post about that with pictures. That sounds like a good idea. I remember a review where Triumph gets mocked for making the rectifier a highlighted feature.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I looked at my 2016 T120, and while moving the bars, I can see enough flexing in the wires of the left side connector that could generate eventual breakage. Especially if the wire installation was short on slack. The right side connector wires did not appear to flex at all.
The problem here (if you're out of warranty) is once those wires break, how much of the wire harness do you have to buy, and how big a headache is it to replace. Or,.... I wonder if new wire can be spliced into the connector ???
Can't help but think that the voltage regulator would have been much better off in a stationery mount somewhere on the frame, and not on the front forks.
Thanks for posting.
GEB
Triumph say they need to replace the entire loom. They won't have one in till end of may!
 

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Tommy, Are you good with soldering?.... Personally, I would be tempted to pull that connector off and study it a bit to see if you might be able to splice some replacement wiring into it that could be connected with solder and heat shrink to the broken ends. If it looks like you can, I would use several loops (coils) of wire between the connector and the broken ends to absorb any flexing. I notice that those three broken wires terminate in grey plastic cylindrical pieces inside the black connector, so I'm wondering if there might be an opportunity to remove them and reveal wire to solder to. Hopefully you can still tell where each broken wire connects to.

I'm thinking that a replacement wiring harness that your dealer installs is likely going to do the same thing in about the same number of miles, unless they've redesigned it.

My Sportster had a turn signal indicator light fail due to a broken connector. Harley only sells the entire replacement harness, not just the connector. So, I ended up "rebuilding" the tiny connector and it worked. I did the same sort of thing with the low voltage output wire on the transformer for this MacBook Air I'm writing on now. It broke inside the insulation from flexing where it enters the transformer case.. The transformer is not designed to be disassembled , but I did anyway,.... nothing to loose. Still works fine.
Let us know if you decide to tackle it.
thanks, GEB
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Tommy, Are you good with soldering?.... Personally, I would be tempted to pull that connector off and study it a bit to see if you might be able to splice some replacement wiring into it that could be connected with solder and heat shrink to the broken ends. If it looks like you can, I would use several loops (coils) of wire between the connector and the broken ends to absorb any flexing. I notice that those three broken wires terminate in grey plastic cylindrical pieces inside the black connector, so I'm wondering if there might be an opportunity to remove them and reveal wire to solder to. Hopefully you can still tell where each broken wire connects to.

I'm thinking that a replacement wiring harness that your dealer installs is likely going to do the same thing in about the same number of miles, unless they've redesigned it.

My Sportster had a turn signal indicator light fail due to a broken connector. Harley only sells the entire replacement harness, not just the connector. So, I ended up "rebuilding" the tiny connector and it worked. I did the same sort of thing with the low voltage output wire on the transformer for this MacBook Air I'm writing on now. It broke inside the insulation from flexing where it enters the transformer case.. The transformer is not designed to be disassembled , but I did anyway,.... nothing to loose. Still works fine.
Let us know if you decide to tackle it.
thanks, GEB
Sadly no good with soldering, I'll be checking the refitted loom for tension when it goes on. I'll let you all know how it goes
 

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I quit!

I am NOT going to read this wiring forum, NOT going to look at the wiring harness @ my headstock anymore. It is terrible in here/there. Nothing but bad news. My wires are crushed (lots of different wires exposed) from the clutch cable and any second now my regulator plugs will have the wires ripped from them : ( "Kludged" a temporary fix with another (massive) zip-tie. Making the 5 hour round-trip to the dealer in two weeks for my recall harness tidy. :frown2:

From now on I am sticking to READING the "Girls on Motorcycles" forum for the articles.

https://www.triumphrat.net/biker-hang-out/168182-girls-on-motorcycles-pics-and-comments.html >:)
 

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Tommy,...O.K., If soldering is not your forte, I would at least encourage you to challenge the dealer as to how a replacement harness is going to solve the problem, assuming that it is exactly like the one that failed.
If their response does not instill confidence, go after Triumph directly.

What you have discovered, I think, is serious enough to consider splicing in some additional wire to absorb the flexing or possible relocation. I did notice the other day after riding the T120 that the regulator does get warm. So, relocation, perhaps, should be thought out carefully.

Thanks,
GEB
 

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Official Relocation of Rectifier

Interestingly, Triumph has relocated the regulator behind the radiator on the 2019 Street Twin....

But Yous Guys probably knew that? Looks like my next project when forest fire season puts an end to my dirt riding.

G
 

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Looks like Triumph made the regulator relocation pretty easy for 2019 by putting a couple of mounting bosses in the frame downtimes. I just moved the one on my SC to about the same location, but had to use the horn mounting boss to get it there. Well worth doing though - you will be amazed how relaxed the wiring bundle at the neck becomes when you only have the headlight and clocks feeds going on.
 

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Relocating the regulator.

Better than that. I took some pictures and did a little write up -attached here. May have few typos yet, as my message above. I saw that the 2019 ST has a regulator bracket that mounts to the frame and puts the reg behind the radiator. But they added a couple of bosses to the frame downtubes so that the reg is supported on both sides and is as high as they could get it. I guess without those they didn't want to get into fixing everybody's bike and is going to leave them chasing red herrings - like that pesky clutch cable.

Behind the rad is about all you can do with the existing wiring. I used the horn mount boss and it is a little lower, but that is okay as it sees some air flow from the upper third of the fan.

I buttoned everything up this morning and did a short shakedown run. And you Will not believe how much more relaxed the bundle at the neck is. I'm no longer feeling like I have to get a frame mount fairing to eliminate the fork effect.
 

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