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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've searched the site for this info, couldn't find anything specific.

The fork oil in my '03 ST needs changing, badly. Don't want to use the dealer, he charges $200 for the job! But pulling the forks to change the oil? Seems complicated. Anyone tried using a tube and suction to remove the oil, maybe with a Mity-Vac? I figure that fork tops can easily removed (?) and gain access that way. Feedback? Thanks.
 

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As I think you might suspect, the only way to get all of the old fluid out is to hang them upside down.

It has been done using the methods you ask about, but they are not as effective.

Removing the forks is not that complicated, and has been done successfully by many owners who are not super wrenches.

Since you have an 03, the seals might need changing also.
 

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I thought about using a tube w/ suction when I was about to change mine, then someone reminded me there are drain plugs on the bottom most part of each fork (on mine anyway, its an '02ST)

To change my fork oil, I set up my bike on my lift pulled the front wheel/axle, the blocked the bike up so the forks were as verticle as possible(still on the bike). Pulled the plugs and let her drain. I have one of those 'hyperdermic-needle' lookin tools that measure how much fluid you want to fill each fork with. Followed how much the wet-fill should be, and refilled the legs (after I put the plugs back in). Turned out well, with no over/under fill.
 

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No drain plug on the '03.

Hardest part of the job is flipping the bike upside down. Of course, getting it back upright is also a pain...


Seriously, though. You need to pull the forks to drain all the oil out, and to flush the yuck out with clean mineral spirits. And wipe down the springs.

There are a couple threads concerning the procedure. First tip: Bust loose the caps before you loosen the tree bolts. Second tip: When you put the cap back on, have one person (with the wrench) hold the cap down, and the other person turn the tube. It is much easier to thread the cap on that way. I hold the slider in a bench vise, and clamp it on the upper caliper mount.

Most folks use 15 weight fork oil at a slightly higher level than stock. I also added a half inch to the spacer (I made a new one, longer).

OnD is correct concerning the seals, but I am of the opinion that they are good until they aren't. I've seen (and done) seal replacements where the old seals didn't leak, and the new ones did. My '03 is coming up on its second fork service, and I still have no leakage (touch wood).

Whatever you decide, avoid the 'lifetime' seals!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I thought that pulling the forks would be the only way to go, especially to do it correctly.

I've searched the Rat site and the internet, can't find any info that details removing the forks to do this job. I'd appreciate any leads on where to find write-ups about it, if any. Thanks.
 

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This may sound like a lazy kind of quickfix, but is it advisable for those that wish to increase the oil level AND change it to a heavier grade to just add a few mls of very heavy fork oil? All that would be required is to unscrew the caps and pour the required amount in with the existing oil.

Anyone think this would be a bad idea, as an experiment?

*Note: I have no intention of doing anything with my forks or fork oil at this point in time but am just putting it out there for discussion.
 

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TX,

Try these:

http://www.triumphrat.net/sprint-forum/84289-fork-oil.html

http://www.triumphrat.net/sprint-forum/84957-re-changing-front-fork-springs.html

And the best one: http://www.triumphrat.net/sprint-forum/54342-setting-static-sag-racetech-products.html

My only addition is that, if you want to take the damper tube out, the best tool for the job is an air impact wrench. Otherwise, you need to have a special tool to hold the damper rod to keep it from turning. Impact only to break loose or to snug the bolt. Torque to spec with a proper Torque wrench.

HTH!
 
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