Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts
H

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
WHEN I TRY TO MEASURE CHAIN TENSION ON MY 2001 THUNDERBIRD THE CHAIN HITS THE PLASTIC CHAIN GUIDE AFTER ABOUT 10MM OF TRAVEL,CANNOT SEE HOW TO AVOID THIS, CAN ANYBODY TELL ME WHAT I AM DOING WRONG ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
To clarify, are you saying that the chains seems fine and then you rotate the rear wheel a short distance and it tightens/loosens or is it hitting another parts of the guard?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
722 Posts
Henders doesn't mean the chain guard, but the chain block - what the Triumph fiche calls the rubbing strip. It's the plastic piece that wraps around and protects the forward part of the swing arm from the chain.

Henders is right, when you deflect the lower run of the chain upwards by lifting it with your finger, it hits the bottom of the chain block. But you can still measure chain deflection despite that.

I place a rule at the midpoint, and then rotate the wheel until the chain is at its lowest point on the rule (loosest). Then I lift up the chain at that point to measure deflection. Yes, the chain will hit the block but you can still lift the chain until you measure total deflection. Like others on this forum, I tend to go to the top of the acceptable range - a loose chain is better than a tight chain for wear and tear as well as driveability.
 
H

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
thanks parry will give it a try when i invest in a paddock stand
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
I was contemplating this myself or least what is free-play. deflecting the chain as much as possible or gently raising it from its resting position until you are no longer taking up the slack. I suspect it is the latter but have not been able to confirm it. here is some of what I have come across:

Chain maintenance

additional check...
check the chain for signs of wear by pulling it straight back from the rearmost point on the rear sprocket.

sorry chris...
Find the tight spot in your chain before you check it. If you adjust it in a loose spot it may bind when it rolls around to the tight spot.

there are a few helpful threads on this site. I could not find the one I was looking for(guy was a bike mechanic). He suggested majority of user maintained bikes had chains that you could bounce a quarter off of (Paraphrasing of course) however jist of it was to suggest putting a heavy person on the bike to press the sprockets to a horizontal alignment. Like it is when ridden. Presumably maximizing accuracy of the tight measurement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,576 Posts
Allowing for the arcuate motion of the swinging arm, the tightest point of the chain is when the gearbox sprocket, swinging arm pivot and rear axle are in a straight line. I get my son to bounce up and down on the seat to check my adjustment.
unlike some things in life, it's better slack than tight.
:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,576 Posts
No.
The chain will be at it's tightest when the gearbox sprocket and rear axle are as far apart as they can go (within the range of suspension movement) which is when they are in a straight line with the swinging arm pivot.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top