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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there's posts on this... but to be honest I just wanted to start a new one.

Its time to replace my chain on my 95 S3, and I'm thinking about doing the rear sprocket as well. What are the specs on the chain and sprocket? (my Haynes is burried and boxed up so I dont' have the info...)

What new/improved bits can I get for it? Any snazzy sprockets out there?
 

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You will be a bit limited on choices. The last time that I did it I used JT sprockets. A 45 tooth on the rear is really nice, better acceleration with no consequence to the top speed. Some guys fit alloy sprockets but I prefer the durability and economy of steel.

If you're changing the rear sprocket change the front too. It will have the most wear and doesn't cost much. It IS semi difficult to get to. Schedule the sprocket change with an oil change. Purchase a cover gasket and get a new shifter shaft seal while you're at it.
 

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Chain and sproket?

hi Tealetm,

Did this job myself a couple of months back. Standard ratio is 17/43 and I went to 17/42 (I'm always looking for 6th gear) but as sailfish suggests many go for a slightly larger rear sprocket. There are many aftermarket brands and your fav dealer will have catalogues. If you search the DID website you can get the chain specs - from memory its 110 links and "530" size.

In your toolkit you will also need 12mm allen keys and a large socket for the countershaft 36mm? I think. Dont forget a new tabwasher. you will need a good torque wrench for tightening the front sproket also.

Overall not too difficult if you are methodical.

Good luck - Kiwigeoff:D
 

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A rough rule of thumb is that steel sprockets last as long as 2 chains, while alloy should be changed with every chain.

I used a Dremel tool to cut the rivet off of my old chain.

I really, really like the EK screw-type master link. It is way, way easier to put on than a rivet link. ****, it's easier to put on than a clip link.

Mot, as always, your site is a most excellent resource!

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I took a look at the Renthal sprockets and that what I'm looking to get. Thanks for the link to their site by the way.

Now I just have to actually find where to buy it... will any dealer have the renthal products and chain access?

Mot- on your site you siad you went with the longer chain because you ddin't know if you needed to or not with the 45T rear sprocket. Did you indeed need to get the longer chain?

I think I'll go with the 45T to increase the acceleration factor- after all thats what puts the grin on my face not top speed! Mot- you didn't indicate on your site but did you stick with the original 17T front sprocket with the new 45T rear?
 

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Travis: 1 tooth smaller up front = 3 teeth bigger in the rear. Just a good rule to keep in mind when playing with sprockets.

There's a gear ratio chart on this page.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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I took a look at the Renthal sprockets and that what I'm looking to get. Thanks for the link to their site by the way.

Now I just have to actually find where to buy it... will any dealer have the renthal products and chain access?

Mot- on your site you siad you went with the longer chain because you ddin't know if you needed to or not with the 45T rear sprocket. Did you indeed need to get the longer chain?

I think I'll go with the 45T to increase the acceleration factor- after all thats what puts the grin on my face not top speed! Mot- you didn't indicate on your site but did you stick with the original 17T front sprocket with the new 45T rear?
I took 4 links out to make it 110 link chain (standard length) it was a bit of a squeeze and the adjuster was fully in (ie shortest setting) so you could fit anything from a 110 to 112 I reckon and it would work.

Kept the 17 tooth front sprocket...;-)

All the best Mot
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Just bought the new setup from Destiny Motorsports in Syracuse, NY (shipped to Albany the total was just over $300). RK Racing Chain, JT 17 tooth front sprocket, Supersprox 46 tooth rear (aluminum center, steel teeth).






Old front sprocket, notice the teeth all curved...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Old rear steel sprocket


New Supersprox mounted



Taking the old chain off was quite the ordeal, I'll be honest and say that I broke my chain breaker trying to figure out how to use it. I ended up using a 4" angle grinder to take out the old master link.

I drained the oil (darn sprocket cover design!), jacked the bike up, pulled the sidestand/gearshift/sprocket cover, removed the rear wheel, took off the chain then removed the front sprocket. After spending an hour and countless rags, I cleaned up the front sprocket cover and engine of all the wax and leaking oil (see other thread). I reassembled the whole thing w/o the chain on, and filled it back up with oil. Hopefully I can pull it apart today and see a nice clean source of the oil leak (I have a feeling its coming from the front sprocket drive shaft seal...).

Maybe tomorrow I'll have the new chain on and be able to ride it again
 

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An angle grinder is really a better tool for the job. Most chain breakers are barely adequate for the task. I would venture that the angle grinder would pay for itself vs. chain breakers in 3 or 4 chains. :p

I *really* don't like tools that consistently break when used as intended.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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I went the RK chain/Renthal sprocket combo but I've got to say that Supersprox looks pretty cool. I also broke by chain breaker but it was when pressing in the rivets for the new chain. I also replaced the slider block so with the swing arm out I didn't need to break the old chain. New bits made riding the S3 smoother.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I should probably replace the slider block as well, but I'l lsave that for another rainy day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
What a difference the 46T makes! I finally got it all back together and took it out for a spin.

The bike s eems to run smoother with the new sprockets and new chain, and the acceleration factor due to the additional three teeth in the rear is pretty drastic.

At 80 mph I'm running around 6krpm! But aroudn town its going to be nice, it wants to pull and pull and keep pulling.

I recommend the change if you don't solely ride on the highwayS
 

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I know I'm off topic here but Kit, thanks for the advice on the EK chain with screw type link. I put that on my Daytona and it was really easy to install. The new chain makes a complete difference, much smoother.
 

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In defense of the chain tool, a chain replacement was the easiest task I have done so far on this bike, and I have limited mechanical experience. I used the RK one at the link below. Now, the only problem is I need a carb sync tool and already blew my hundred bucks on this thing. Anyone wanna swap?:)

Although, to Kit's point, I have only used it once so I can't speak to the longevity of such a device. Gauging by his experience it has at least 2-3 chains left in it.

http://www.rk-excel.co.jp/global/chain/chain_tool.htm
 
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