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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm finally getting around to replacing the chain on my 2000 T-Bird, and I've got several questions before I get started.

I bought an EK X-ring chain along with a Motion-Pro breaking and riveting tool, but I've still got a few more things to buy. First, the new sprockets. JT sprockets on the BikeBandit website are significantly cheaper than Triumph sprockets. I read an article somewhere, though, that said the OEM sprockets are better. Can anyone enlighten me here? I will gladly go to great lengths to avoid paying the ridiculously inflated prices for Triumph parts. I'm planning on going with the stock 17/43 arrangement. Any significant benefit to be gained from monkeying with the number of teeth? I'm happy enough with the power the way it is.

I guess I'm going to need some gaskets and whatnot. I've heard differing reports on just what exactly I need to replace when I've got the sprocket cover off. I'm fairly confident that I'll need to order the following: sprocket cover gasket, sprocket nut lock washer, and gearchange shift oil seal. I'd also lilke to replace the chain rubbing block. Is there anything else essential? I called my local Triumph dealer, and the guy in parts was baffled (and, I think, annoyed) by his search for some of these part names. Does Triumph have other names for these parts?

The Haynes manual and other sources have said that I need a torque wrench. Do I?

Drain the oil or not? Some on this site have said that they got away without draining it, and only lost a few pints when the sprocket cover came off.

Thanks a lot to any of you who are willing to take time to address some or all of these questions.
 

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I didnt drain my oil when I replaced the chain and sprockets, onlly got about 150ml of oil from the cover when it came off. That should be all the gaskets and seals you need, some like to change the output shaft seal, I havent changed mine and I have had no issues.
I went one tooth larger on the front sprocket, to allow that expensive rubbing doohickey to last a little longer. It may feel that its geared too tall for a heavier rider, I dont weigh much so it makes hardly any difference to me.
I would recommend you get a good quality torque wrench, its easy to over tighten bolts going into alloy. better to be sure than sorry.
The cheaper sprockets are OK I have good results from some evil taiwanese brand sprockets, they only last as long as the chain anyway. If you dont replace sprockets and chains as a set you'll be throwing money away.

[ This message was edited by: WoodsieIII on 2007-02-10 19:06 ]
 

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Looks like you've got the bases covered on seals and gaskets.

Make sure you got a 114 link (or longer) chain. A lot of vendors mistakenly have the classics listed as using a 110 link.

I bought the JT sprockets from bikebandit. I haven't put many miles on them yet, but they seem to be of good quality. The main noticeable difference is that the OEM front sprocket has some sort of rubber dampening material on the sides. I can't really say if it makes any difference as my OEM chain had a lot of noise and vibration from being completely shot.

If you do decide to go with larger sprockets than stock, you might need a couple extra links. With an 18 front and 45 back (to spare the rubbing block), I had to use 116 links. The chain is all the way at the minimum adjustment and is still slightly tighter than spec. I'm hoping it loosens up before something else does. :???:
 

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Previous post might be useful - http://www.triumphrat.net/modules.php?op=modload&name=Forum&file=viewtopic&topic=61002&forum=14. You don't say what miles it has but I would say the sprockets should be replaced with the chain. I have had no problems with JTF sprockets.

Provided the bike is vertical and not on the sidestand, then I don't think you need to drain the oil. IMHO, you definitely need a torque wrench. The engine cover bolts could easily strip if you overtighten, and lets face it, poor or inadequate maintenance on a motorcycle could have potentially fatal consequences. Why take the risk?

The mech you spoke to is either new or incompetent - it's not your job to know the esoteric terms Triumph apply to parts. Provided you can adequately describe what is you are doing or wanting to do, he/she should be able to id the parts needed and tell you if you should be doing anything else whilst you are in there. Just my tuppence worth.

Good luck.
 

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Does anybody happen to know the size of the nut on the front sprocket?
 

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36mm. You can find a 36mm axle nut socket at your local parts store for a fraction of the cost of a normal socket.
 

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There is a seal around the clutch push rod shaft, and there is a seal around the counter shaft. I replaced those while I was in there. The counter shaft shaft seal was visibly worn when compared to a new one.

3600008-T0301 oil seal goes in the sprocket cover around the shift shaft
T1260801 Sprocket cover gasket
3600006-T0301 counter shaft oil seal
1180180-T0301 Sprocket Nut Washer
3600012-T0301 Clutch pushrod seal
2059440-T0301 Swingarm rubbing strip to vin 29156
T2056760 Swingarm rubbing strip from vin 29156

These part numbers came from a Thunderbird Parts fiche.
I would double check them with your dealer to make sure they are correct for the VIN of your bike.

I replaced all of those seals while I had the sprocket cover off. Just preventative maintenance.

I used JT sprockets. the Triumph Countershaft sprocket is rubber cushioned, that's probably why it costs so much more than aftermarket.

The nut on the countershaft (front) sprocket is 36mm.
When I went shopping for that all I could find was a 6 point deep well Impact socket. For Front axle on Front drive autos. But an impact wrench is certainly helpful for removing it. I used a torque wrench to assemble it.

I was also pretty happy with the stock 43/17 (2.53) gearing but I changed to 45/18 (2.50) since the rubbing strip on my bikes was badly worn. I figure that will give a tiny bit more clearance. IIRC I used a 116 link chain with that gear combo. 96 TBird and 98 TBS used the same parts.
 

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The opening paragraph of your post sounds exactly like what I did. I used the JT sprockets, stock gearing, don't remember the exact brand and model (DID? -- it's snowing so it doesn't matter), Motion Pro chain tool. I set the bike vertical, no significant oil came out. I don't know if I got the master link peened loose enough, but if not I'll just end up buying a new link and changing it.

I didn't have the rubbling block on hand, so I dropped the shock a month or so latter (surprise, the linkage was pretty dry -- check this while you have it apart).

No new gaskets. I always keep a can of Permatex/Loktite form-a-gasket (aviation grade, etc). Use it IF you tear a gasket (only on one side if you use a new gasket). Change what leaks, not what doesn't.

Covert the 36 mm to inches and make a run to the swap meet (in this size range they all pretty much go to a 6 sided socket -- your bike will never know it had a factional socket on it).

Nothing stranger than any other bike (ok, the sprocket cover is a pita).
 

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I did much the same as Mojoinco.

I replaced the sprockets and chain.
The rubbing block looked OK.
The cover came off without any problems and little/no oil leaking out.
The seals and gasket looked good on the cover and had not leaked in the past. I cleaned and greased the shifter shaft to prevent damage to the seal.

I took the time to modify my cover so I would not have to remove it the next time I needed to change the chain and sprockets.
Here is a link to the photos of my cover mod.
.Cover Mod Photo


It has been almost a year without any problems.




[ This message was edited by: zimtok on 2007-02-13 10:05 ]
 

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On 2007-02-13 09:53, zimtok wrote:
I cleaned and greased the shifter shaft to prevent damage to the seal.
Wrapping the splines with electrical tape before you remove or refit the cover will provide the best protection.

another tip - loosen the front sprocket with a breaker bar while somebody sits on the bike holding the rear brake on - obviously before you remove the chain. Use a similar procedure for tightening it but with a torque wrench instead of a bar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks everyone, and thanks a lot, Denny, for those part numbers.

It's currently too cold in my garage to even think about this repair, so I'll order the parts and wait until the thermometer creeps above 40 F. At the rate we're going, though, that could be mid-June.

Cheers
 

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I had an aftermarket 45 tooth sproket on the rear for a bit, slightly better acceleration, but the gas mileage dropped off quite a bit!!! Back to 17/43, and on my 3rd chain and second set of sprockets at 60,000kilometers on a Y2K TBS.
 
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