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Ok so I'm looking to buying my first Sprint. Never had a chain drive bike. Is it a pain to keep clean and maintain?
 

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Piece of cake.
Every 500 miles or so, or weekly if you don't ride all that much, wipe it down with a rag and then spray a coating of chain lube over it. You'll find about 30 different types on sale at various bike outlets or your local dealer. Pick one and use it often, opinions on the matter are varied as which oil to use in the engine. As with motor oil, so long as its kept clean and changed often, it really doesn't matter.

Avoid strong solvents when cleaning the chain as they can attack O-rings and actually shorten the life of your chain.

You should expect 15-16K miles out of a chain, which is about what I get. 13K on the second one if, like me, you only change sprockets on every other chain. I do about 35K a year so I tend to go through them, even with religious maintenance. Works out for me, every other set of tires, I change the chain, every 4th set, chain and sprockets.
 

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I go with, every 2nd tank fill up with I clean and lube my chain.


Shawn
 

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Mick don't use WD40 to lube your chain, you can use it to wipe it clean before you lube it. Use a chain lube or chain wax
 

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Kerosene is good for cleaning before applying the lube.

You can get a relatively small container at any store that sells camping supplies. A quart will last a long time.
 

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Kerosene works fine

I put on some gloves, throw a little kerosene in a pan and soak an old rag, then wipe down the chain with the soaked rag. Take a clean dry rag, wipe the chain dry and give it a squirt of lube after it's had a chance to air dry.

Apply chain lube when the chain is warm, every fill-up or two. Let it soak in awhile before riding again.

I've got 20K miles on my original chain and have only had to adjust it two or three times. Still looks fine.
 

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+1 BobsUrUncleX12 and -1 smoothbrain

Honestly, putting kerosene on modern chain is like using lye soap in your dishwasher.
That is not true, smoothbrain where did you get that from?

I Use:
Kerosine with rubber gloves on, soak a clean rag with kerosine and wipe all the crap off keep wetting the rag and using a clean section until clean and then apply your choice of chain lube after wiping dry with another clean rag.
Much the same as BobsUrUncleX12.


Kerosine will not harm your chain in anyway if you use it like this.

I have been using it for 35 years so far and my first chain on my Sprint lasted 50,000kms.

This is a tried and true method many motorcylists have used for decades and still use it on modern chains, it removes grease and particles of dirt that make grinding paste and leaves you chain clean and once dried off ready to lube.

DaveM:cool:
 

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Hi,

Ok so I'm looking to buying my first Sprint. Never had a chain drive bike. Is it a pain to keep clean and maintain?
I've looked through the subject and nobody told about automatic oilers like Scottoiler or Prooiler.
I can recommend such a solution - I use Scottoiler for years (Sprint is my 2nd bike where I've got installed it) and the chain maintanance is checking if the chain is not loose too much very few times. If it is - 5 minutes regulation and it's enough :)

You shouldn't be worry about that :)
 

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Hi,



I've looked through the subject and nobody told about automatic oilers like Scottoiler or Prooiler.


Agreed, look into a Scottoiler. They're not for everyone so make your own mind up. At least you have another option to consider.
 

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Honestly, putting kerosene on modern chain is like using lye soap in your dishwasher.
As OnD asked, since this is the only Triumph approved method of cleaning a chain that I know of, you will have to explain this.

Kerosene, diesel, paraffin, home heating oil #2 and jet fuel are all pretty much the same and will do a good job of cleaning a chain.

The quickest way to wear out a chain and sprocket set (not to mention causing the countershaft sprocket seal leak) is to have the chain adjusted too tight.

Keep it adjusted at the loosest end on the manual specs. properly and you won't have a problem and very little if any adjustment issues.

IMO oilers are a total waste of time, space and weight. With old Harleys, corn binders, Hendersons and such they might have had a place but with today's modern chains, sprocket sets, lubes and materials not needed at all. In seven years here one one with an oiler has gotten longer service out of a chain/sprocket set than those with a properly cared for set and that doesn't take much effort.

Folks new to chains generally do three things, over tighten, over lube and over perseverate on their chains.
 

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Agree totally with dolson re staying on the loose end of the spec. You might experience a bit of throttle snatch, but you should get used to it so that it is no big deal.

Now, here is where the Old Timers disease kicks in. I remember someone posting that Triumph had issued a revision to the ST chain spec. I thought I had copied the Triumph bulletin but guess I didn't? I did write the new numbers in my shop manual. The new range is 27 - 37mm. Hmmm, tighter.:eek:

Have I been smoking my socks, or does anyone else remember this? And anyone visiting their dealer in the next few days, could you ask about this?


Edit: Aha! The Oldtimers is just temporary. Found it in the Maint sticky.

http://www.triumphrat.net/maintenan...ate-st-1050-chain-free-movement-or-slack.html
 

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Kerosene is coal oil and it works great for cleaning your chain but the best stuff I've ever used for cleaning is Marvel Mystery Oil (I know...finally, mystery solved). Far as WD-40, it works fine for cleaning as well and displaces moisture very well from between plates, pins and rollers and will not harm o-rings or other seal types. The last thing in the world I'd ever use to lubricate a final drive chain again is chain wax. What a mess.
 

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"I change the chain, every 4th set, chain and sprockets"

Have to disagree w/ this one. You should get 25,000 to 35,000 miles from a properly maintained chain and sprocket, however when it is time you should change both sprockets and chain together. Putting a new chain on a partially worn sprocket will cause premature wear on the new chain and already partially wore out sprocket. Might be the reason you get poor mileage from them.
I have 20,000 miles on mine now and they look and perform almost as if they were new.
 

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The great debate is on:D

For years Triumph Recommended kerosene as the primary cleaner for chains.

When I talked to my dealer a couple of weeks back he told me that kerosene or WD-40 were the only things they use in the shop. With WD-40 being used for other things around the shop I'm sure you can guess what they use the most.:rolleyes:
 

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When I talked to my dealer a couple of weeks back he told me that kerosene or WD-40 were the only things they use in the shop. With WD-40 being used for other things around the shop I'm sure you can guess what they use the most.:rolleyes:
Nice story. But since a gallon of kerosene runs about $3.00 and a gallon of WD40 will cost around $15.00, I'm guessing they use kerosene. Wudda ya tink?:D
 

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Well I'm just about to do a full chain and sprocket change at just under 9.000 miles. I'm quite anal about my cleaning, lubing and adjustment check routine. By the sound it the front sprocket that's worn. Push the bottom run of chain upwards tight and click comes from the front sprocket. Likewise sat on the bike and pushing it backwards.
Gear changes have got a bit raggy.
OND the revised chain settings of 27 to 37 I believe were with the bike on its sidestand whereas the measurements we have been using are with the bike on its centre(center) stand. I've just done both and they seem to equate to the same ammount of free movement.
As for this slack chain thing I find gear changing much smoother with the adjustment midway to tighter end of scale.
 
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