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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last night I loosened my chain up about 1 turn on the adjuster bolts. I recently had adjusted it to the factory specs, per both the factory manual and haynes book instructions, 25-30mm on the center stand. I weigh 210 lbs., and I have noticed that I was hearing a rumbling sort of noise when in motion, and I assumed it might be the chain. My daughter helped me measure it last night with me on board, and I adjusted it between the 25 - 30mm with me on it. Once that was set, I remeasured it on the center stand unladen, and it was something like 40mm. I'm going to ride it like this for awhile and then I'll post back any feedback.
 

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I would make that about right- 25-30mm of slack with the wheel off the ground makes for zero slack in normal use! The Haynes manual gets this wrong.
 

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I also adjusted my chain recently. I have both Haynes and the Triumph shop manual. Neither reference mentions anything about loading the bike with the riders weight. The Triumph manual instructs setting the bike on either the side stand or center stand.
Is it possible both manuals would assume we would sit on the bike while performing the freeplay check? If the bike was on a center stand, would it even make a difference?
Curious to know how you experienced mechanics see this one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Really, when you consider why the chain requires adequate freeplay, it makes no sense that the load to be carried would not be factored in when setting the adjustment. As I understand it, the chain will change its' tension depending on the travel of the swingarm and the resulting change in geometry. Since the load being carried will affect this, setting on an unloaded bike could work only if the rider's weight fell within certain limits that did not exceed the slack when the rear suspension was under compression. It seems reasonable that style of riding and common local road conditions might also be a factor, as rough roads and more aggressive riding would have the bike's suspension operating at both fully extended and fully compressed states. I will also mention that a very small change in the rear adjuster bolts translates into quite a large change in the chain itself, so if you are going to adjust your change, start with small increments.
 

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I will also mention that a very small change in the rear adjuster bolts translates into quite a large change in the chain itself, so if you are going to adjust your change, start with small increments.
Indeed. I use the flats on the adjuster bolt as a reference. Sometimes 1/2 a flat is enough.
 
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