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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry Im a bit new to my triple and her maintenance. I was curious when checking the chain free movement adjustment as the manual calls for where and how do I take measurement? The book seems to be a little vague and I just want to make sure I am doing it correctly.

Also the book calls for the range for vertical movement to be .051 -1.25 inch..If I am doing it correctly mine is more like 4"...Just had my rear tire patched, maybe the mechanic didn't make the adjustment?
 

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The Owner's Manual says to check halfway between the two sprockets with the bike on the sidestand and no weight (luggage, etc) on the bike.

4 inches sounds dangerously loose to me:eek:
 

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With that much slack, the chain probably is hitting the swingarm and could even fall off the sprokets. If you lift up on the bottom run of the chain between the sprockets, you should not be able to push it up against the swing arm. Fix it now but not too tight. Best is about 1 inch free play up and down ( chain centerline movement) on the side stand in neutral no rider. Flop it up and down with your fingers without pushing either way real hard and total difference between full up and full down is the measurement. Also roll it around until you get the tightest spot (if there is one) and set the chain tension at that tightest spot. I had mine set at the 1/2 inch minimum and it seemed too tight. 3/4 inch to 1 1/4 inch feels ideal. You want the suspension to move freely without being restricte by the chain and you don't want too much extra pressure on the tranny sprocket.
 

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Deanoh is right; around an inch slack (up and down) mid way on the chain. Make sure you have exactly the same adjustment on BOTH sides of the swingarm (check the marks) so the wheels are in proper alignment, and the adjuster is snugged and the locking nut tightened AFTER tightening the axle nut. Best to buy a proper stand and bobbins for this job (you need it to remove the wheel for tire replacement anyway). Also clean the chain by spraying WD 40 on a rag (never on the chain) and cleaning it by hand, then spray with high-quality motorcycle chain lube; your sprockets will last longer and the chain will run much quieter. - Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the Info guys! Got it fixed up to just under an inch. Feel a lot safer now!!
 

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One more little thing. You want the axle to be full against the stops. Thats why WS has you tightening the axle first. Before you torque the axle nut you can "temporarliy" stick a screwdriver between the chain and rear sprocket and roll the screwdriver around the sprocket between the chain and that will pull the chain tight and pull the axle tight against the stops so that you can be sure the axle is against the stops and not move when you tighten the axle nut. After that you will get little or none gap at the adjuster bolts but you can still test them to see if you can turn them against the tightened axle so that there is no gap.
 

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Before you torque the axle nut you can "temporarliy" stick a screwdriver between the chain and rear sprocket and roll the screwdriver around the sprocket between the chain and that will pull the chain tight and pull the axle tight ].
Good way of wrecking the chain and sprocket.

Loosen the axle nut then pinch it up just enough that there's still a bit of bite on it. Loosen the locknuts on the adjusters and screw them out until the adjustment is right. Use a hard pull up, then down on the chain and it's the distance between the two that you measure.

On the Street the tension is set a bit more slack than many bikes - about 1.25 inches. Too tight puts side loads on the gearbox output shaft that can exacerbate bearing wear.

If you still had a little pressure on the axle nut then the wheel will be tight against the adjusters and will stay tight while you tighten the adjuster lock nuts then tighten the axle nut. If the axle still tries to pull back from the adjuster use a soft faced mallet to tap the wheel back into place as you tighten the nut - you can use a piece of wood as a drift against the ends of the axle if you need to.

I find that a Scott Oiler does the best job of keeping the chain properly lubricated, especially if you ride in wet or very dusty conditions, but it still needs to cleaned occasionally with an oily rag. Petrol or Kerosene are probably the best solvents for this. I like WD40 for most things but I'm a bit wary of its effects on chain O rings.

Rob
 

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I check my chain slack on a rear stand. In 12,000 miles of use, it's only needed adjustment 1 time (other than tire changes). I believe regular cleaning and lubing (about 300-500 mile intervals) have attributed to keeping the chain in excellent condition - it still looks pretty new, and has no measurable stretch.
 
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