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Sorry if this has been repeated 5 gazillion times but, I need a new chain and sprockets for my '04 ST. Any advice? Stock from the dealer? Any advantage to aftermarket? What pitch is the chain?

I'm at work so I don't have any literature handy. Thanks for any help.


Jeff
 

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I favor OEM for sprockets and the aftermarket for chains. 1 set of sprockets every other chain replacement.

Chain is a 530 and readily available. I don't know how many links our bikes require but that info is easily found.

You will need some other tools for the top quality aftermarket chains as they no longer use master links. You will need a rivet tool to close the new chain and a really good chain breaker to get the old chain off.

Key to chain life is clean and lube it often. SOP for me is once a week when just banging around locally, daily when on a trip. Spray a rag till pretty wet with WD-40 and wipe down the chain then, up on center stand, 2nd gear at idle RPM and spray with a quality chain lube/preservative. I favor the Motul stuff as it doesn't fly off.

BTW frequent and proper adjustment also contributes to chain life although the latest chains seem to only require one adjustment at about 600 miles and nothing after till about 15K miles. They go pretty quickly after that though so it makes a good indicator that it is time for a new chain.
 

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Just go to your local dealer and pick up an oem chain and sprocket...if your going to keep the bike for awhile longer. The oem chain and sprockets lasted this long..so why mess with success right?
 

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When ever you renew a chain you must always replace the sprockets as well.

You do not just change out a chain. Otherwise you will get strange wear as the sprockets bed to the chain.

DaveM:cool:
 

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I *really* like the EK chain's screw-type master link. It's much easier to install than either a clip or a rivet, requires only tools you probably own already, & is as good as a rivet link.

Also, I disagree with our esteemed moderator here: I replace my sprockets every other chain, as a general rule.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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If it doesn't already have the mod, go for the 18T front sprocket. I installed JK sprockets and a DID chain at 36,000 km.

No WD40 for mine though. Just Motul or BelRay chain lube - white spray every 600km or so.
 

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I've just changed my chain @ 19K miles.
Swapped to 18 / 43 Renthall Sprockets with a Tsubaki Chain.
The sprocket change has completely altered the character of the bike.
If your looking for high milage touring the stocker might be better.
 

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P'Jim

Why the 43? Most with the 1050 that opt for the 18t leave the rear at 42t.


As for S'stroked and his mention of the dreaded WD40, give him a break and read all of his post. He uses it as a cleaner and follows that with chain lube.
 

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I *really* like the EK chain's screw-type master link. It's much easier to install than either a clip or a rivet, requires only tools you probably own already, & is as good as a rivet link.

Also, I disagree with our esteemed moderator here: I replace my sprockets every other chain, as a general rule.

Cheers,
-Kit
Ok let me rephrase that:p

I always change em both out.

Cheers,
DaveM:)
 

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Dave,
There is certainly merit in changing chain and sprockets as a set.

My previous bike, on which I put 74K miles before crashing was a Honda Blackbird and I would change sprockets every other chain. Typically, I would get about 16K miles on the first chain and only 13K or so on the second. Sprockets would "look" good after the first chain but the lesser chain life on the second chain was proof of the pudding.

Over a 100K mile life cycle of the motorcycle, that would just about break even money wise. One extra chain vs 6 extra sprockets. I'm not sure yet, no experience, about the quality of the OEM sprockets on a Triumph. Honda OEM sprockets were really good.

I have the pins and a fixture I made up to allow me to measure sprocket wear. I guess I'll see when the time comes. At 540 miles, I'm not worried yet.:D
 

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perfect timing!

I've been considering searching/starting a post regarding chain life when I spotted this thread - great!

my 06 sprint has done about 8000miles and I think my chain might be getting close to replacement, does this sound about right?

others seem to be getting twice that!? - I have a scottoiler and check my chain is well lubed before almost :rolleyes: every ride.

I have adjusted the chain a few times but it hasn't really needed much adjustment.

I assume load can effect chain life? If so I am pretty heavy 100Kg, almost always have stuff in the top box (probably another 10Kg) and occasionally carry a passenger - would this make that much difference?
 

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uniqueadventures

To give you an idea,

I am 102kgs and ride with my wife on my Sprint all the time in a very spirited manner and my OEM chain & sprockets lasted 50,000kms.

the chain was very worn indeed.

cheers,
DaveM:cool:
 

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Ok let me rephrase that:p

I always change em both out.

Cheers,
DaveM:)
Perhaps I should rephrase as well:

Some people think chains & sprockets should be changed as a set, some think sprockets should be inspected & replaced as necessary when the chain is being replaced. Both schools of thought are valid.

I do the replace as necessary thing, & generally find that a set of (steel) sprockets generally lasts 2 chains.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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O n D

According to www.gearingcommander.com I've still got a theoretical 150mph+ topspeed, which in the UK these days gets you 20 to life.
1 up on the rear also keeps the wheelbase the same without altering the chain length.
The area I live in is dotted with small towns only a few miles apart and the 3rd gear response is ideal for leaving the cagers behind as I leave town ( I never speed through town so I tend to have a bit of queue behind me as I reach the open limit). On the twisties between villages it feels more like a slightly overweight sports bike and top speed just isn't an issue.
For dual-carriageway riding the revs still aren't excessive at the speeds I run at, but there's still plenty of acceleration even in top when I need to get out of the way of lorries who pull out like they've got some kind of God given right.
 
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