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I've just spoken to Bub Enterprises about their 2-2 Bonneville system (headers, conti-style cans) and they have agreed to let me take an unfinished set because I don't like chrome and want black.

Should I powder coat them or ceramic coat them? Does anyone know the differences?
 

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Should I powder coat them or ceramic coat them? Does anyone know the differences?

I do not think powder coating and ceramic are the same thing. Ceramic is a very durable coating in the racing/aircraft business. Powder coat is for things that do not take much heat, IE: wheels, engine covers etc. I work in the mechanical business and powder coat is for low heat applications. Ceramic is for HIGH heat applications. Investigate if some one in your area can Black Chrome for you. PS: The Bub Conti Units are BITCHEN to look at. Good luck in your endeavors. Steve. :cool:
The Norton's are on the rise again. :cool:
 

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I had the head pipes on our Bonneville powder coated. Didn't last long at all. I'd strongly suggest going ceramic from the get go.

-brent
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, everyone. That's the advice I was looking for. I have several powder coaters in my city, but they look at me like I'm an alien if I start talking about ceramic coating. They swear their product will last on headers, but I'm not so sure I believe them. I've found a place on the Internet that will do ceramic coating, so I'll just ship the whole mess out to get done once the system arrives.
 

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My understanding is that powder coating uses a mixture of paint and some kind of plasticizer or something. If applied properly it adheres very strongly and is very durable and chip resistant. I don't think it can withstand heat well at all though. If I understand ceramic coating correctly, it is primarily for use where significantly higher temperatures are expected. It also adheres strongly, but is more brittle and chips more easily than powder coating. It only makes sense, ceramic is more brittle than plastic. I have a friend that is building a bitchin' customized '56 Ford panel truck with a ton of mods including a flip front end, Whipple supercharged 32 valve modular motor and overdrive automatic and suspension out of a late '90's Lincoln. Several years ago he put tube headers on it and had them ceramic coated inside and out by an outfit in Waverly Nebraska (about 50 miles west of here). He had them done in silver, but you can get different colors. They did a great job and at the time it was a lot less expensive than I thought it would be, but now I can't remember how much he paid. His exhaust coating has held up well and still looks really good. I know other people who have used this company and were very pleased with their work and their prices. It's a good idea to have both the inside and outside coated because the ceramic coating reflects heat very efficiently and the pipes don't get near as hot and more of the heat is directed out the back of the exhaust. On high performance vehicles this is important because the engine compartment doesn't get near as hot and it helps avoid things like vapor lock. This is especially important at low vehicle speeds when stuck in traffic or leisurely cruising around car shows on a hot summer day. If you're going to ceramic coat your exhaust it's very important to have it done before you use the exhaust because the metal has to be clean for the ceramic to adhere well. If you want me to get you the info on how to contact this company let me know and I'd be happy to try. It might take me a little while because I'll have to do it in my spare time (now there's a novel concept), but I'll get it done ASAP. By the way, DON'T use ceramic coating from Jet Hot Coating company, I know several people who have used them and were very dissatisfied with the quality of their work and their prices. It just didn't hold up well under use. They ended up going someplace else and paying to have the process done over again. Hope this info helps! :cool:

[ This message was edited by: ooobaby on 2006-03-31 00:42 ]
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well, well, well. I just requested a quote from Jet Hot.

Performance Coatings (http://www.performancecoatings.com/) is actually quite close to me, so I'll try them, too. If you could get me the name of the company your friend dealt with, I would really appreciate it.

Another question I have is about the packing in the mufflers. Presumably the process is to strip the old finish with a combination of blasting and chemical stripping, then dunking in the solution followed by the baking process. I'm wondering if the packing will survive that whole process intact or whether I should have Bub leave out the packing and I'll pack it myself when everything is done.
 

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If I can get the info to contact the outfit in Waverly for you I will. I'll ask around, but I'm absolutely positive that if you want the inside of the exhaust coated you won't be able to leave the packing in there while the process is being done. Even if it wouldn't damage the packing (which I'm sure it would), it would be pointless because the coating would be on the packing and not adhered to the inside of the exhaust, so from the aspect of trying to drop your exhaust system heat you'd be shooting yourself in the foot. I think that your only two options would be to remove and repack the mufflers if that's possible, or just have the outside coated. By the way, if you're going to coat the inside of the muffler you should also coat the inside of the header pipe. If you coat the outside of the exhaust don't then wrap it in heat resistant tape because anything wrapped with that stuff I've ever seen went to hell under the tape if you later unwrap it. :cool:
 

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I had the headers of my '98 Sprint 900 coated with a ceramic/metalic coating by Jet-Hot. It's a satin silver finish and still looks very good after 2 1/2 years and 37,000 miles.

The headers had been on my bike for 25,000 miles when I had the coating done. They were beat up chrome but not dented or rusted. The coating has not chipped or cracked and still shines up nice with a paste metal polish. Both inside and outside are coated.

It's a big header and with the two smaller cross-over pipes the cost was only $167. I paid shipping both ways, maybe $50. This is not for the biker who likes his head pipes blue. My headers have not blued.

Jet-Hot gets the big "thumbs up" from me.

j98sprint
 

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Oh yeah, about shipping. Wrap them good with rags then tape them. Then wrap them tightly in cardboard and tape them. Then put them in the correct size box and pack all around them with a packing material. I used lots of crumpled up newspaper. Then tape up the box. Use lots of good reinforced tape. When you're done the pipes should not move at all when you pick up the box and shake it.

I insured the package at the Post Office when I sent it out. It was cheap, about $5 I think.

They sent the pipes back to me well packed.

j98sprint
 

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m_t_yeo: Here's the info you wanted on the outfit that does ceramic coating: Moore Power Coating
10941 N. 142nd ST.
Waverly, NE 68462
(Ph) 402-786-2887

Pull their web site up on the internet under Moore Power Coating and look at some of their work. I talked with that friend of mine who is building the custom '56 Ford panel. I apologize, but I gave you incorrect info before. The headers he got were already ceramic coated by Jet Hot and they were "ok" he said. He then had the rest of the exhaust system ceramic coated inside and out by Moore Power Coating and he thinks they're coating is better. It's shinier and looks almost like chrome. Both Moore's and Jet Hot's work seems to be holding up well for him. He said he's very pleased with Moore's work and their prices and would go back there again in a heart beat. We have another friend with a '54 F-100 who had work done at Moore's and he also liked the quality of their work. It's been a while, but I talked to some guys at a Good Guys show in Des Moines 4th of July weekend a few years ago who didn't like the work they'd had done at Jet Hot, but other than what my buddy with the '56 has, I've never seen their work side by side with Moore's in person. I like Moore's better. Good luck, hope this helps! :cool:

[ This message was edited by: ooobaby on 2006-04-03 19:15 ]
 

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I just recently had my header pipes ceramic coated and they look great. I only have about 200 miles on them so I can't tell you much about durability except that the company that coated them guarantees them for 10 years. I had them done at Finsh Line Coatings in Portland, OR.

Gary
 

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I realize this an old thread and I probably shouldn't bring this particular thread back up because 95% of the info and advice is incorrect.
 

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Ceramic is great. I even tried it for my car. Ceramic coating process is a high-heat, baked-on process of a painted-on material that was developed for protecting heated metals, like aluminium and steel. It is similar to powder coating but the ceramic coating material is not a plastic. I recently go to shop to do ceramic coating for my car . You can check it here Paint Protection & Rust Proofing Services in Brisbane | Ceramic Protection
 

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I had my Iron Cobras exhaust ceramic coated locally in Oz.

Powder coating is going to last about 5 minutes.
716873
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