Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,529 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm ok at the moment getting my T140 onto the centre stand, although I use the side stand 99% of the time.

Some of you have suggested various mods including carrying chunks of wood about, but I came across this from LP Williams.

It is cheap enough to buy, but those in the states could have a go at making one if they have a spare footrest about. Although I hear that Phil at LPW is very cost effective posting stuff to the USA
LEG-0007

here
http://www.triumph-spares.co.uk/news.php
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
986 Posts
Looks nice and tidy. Shouldn't be to tough to fab one up for my 140. I'm one of those guys who just doesn't have the knack for getting the bike up on the center stand. That looks like it will work well. Thanks Dave.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Doesn't say it fits a T140.

Any thoughts???
hi there...if you go to you tube and look at the vintage footage of the meriden factory, there are three old films of the factory. in one of them it shows a worker using the side stand with great ease as he does this all day just before placing new bikes on a roller to break in the machine. he's not very big but knows how to leverage the center stand easily apparently with no troubles....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,529 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I don't have any hassle with the T140, but I can't se it being hard to adapt if it doesn't fit. I wondered if the OIF T120 frame is the same as the T140?

It might be worth a ring to phil if you wanted one.

I actually posted it more as an idea for a DIY solution, but it's so cheap that I'd buy one if it fitted as I value my time more than that (it'd take me ages to make one)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
998 Posts
I agree that technique is involved and that it's your right leg which should do most of the work. The grab handle should only be used to steady the bike and not to pull it up, unless you want to do your back in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,654 Posts
I agree that technique is involved and that it's your right leg which should do most of the work. The grab handle should only be used to steady the bike and not to pull it up, unless you want to do your back in.
I would think that it is the grab handle that should do part of the work.

I have had a couple of centrestands break at the weld between the cast leg and the tubular cross piece, presumably due to twisting if I have put my weight on the stands 'pedal' to force the bike up onto it's stand.

Nowadays I use the 'pedal' only to hold the stand down, and lift/pull the bike backwards onto the stand, steadying / lifting it with my right hand on the rear rack thing and pulling it backwards against the steering stops with my left hand on the left handlebar.

It is a tecnique / knack thing as much as brute force.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,527 Posts
I've always used the foot pedal to do most of the work and my hand on the rear of the bike simply guides and lifts to some extent. Only stand I've ever damaged was on my T120R after I managed to quench it after heating and straightening it. Snapped the bottom leg off like a piece of glass.

A sagging suspension will make a major difference in the effort required to get it up on the center stand. I have a BSA that had sticking front forks (rusted badly and unknown to me as new bike) and I tried to put it on the center stand at a shop that was about to inspect it and no way was it going on that stand. I then tried the side stand and it had to be leaned to the right to get the stand down. That's when I looked at the front and noticed the gaiters were collapsed. When I rectified the problem, went on the center stand with little effort.

regards,
Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
Can't say I've had a problem 'mainstanding' my T140D. Stand on the 'pedal' while lifting under the carrier and it sort of 'rolls' back onto the stand. Very little effort required. You have to get the timing of 'stand and lift' right, a sort of effortless 'swing'. If it feels heavy, your 'timing' of the lift is wrong. Let it down and do it again; once you get the 'feel' for it, it requires very little physical effort.

Like kickstarting, it's more about technique than strength.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
Hi Folks,
Looks like a good idea to me.
I weigh 150# and have a hard time with my T140.
I also have an arthritic back that flares up from time to time.
Seems like two handles would be better than one?
Maybe adapt a couple of spring loaded kickstart pedal levers similar to what's shown onthe link?
(a bit smaller and probably better looking)
I can get mine up (oops) with some trouble, but when servicing the back wheel , i need to use a thin piece of plywood under the stand to get enough clearance.
Speaking of pedal levers, i just drilled and tapped the end of mine for a washer and nut to keep the rubber cover from loosening off while kicking.
I had a 3/16" x 24 tap and used a rubber grommet to fill out the space.
Works great!
If anyone's interested, i'll post a pic. . .
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,529 Posts
Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
http://www.amoirtools.co.uk/Small Lift.html

Morris,

I used to use a bit of wood (several) and rock the bike from side to side, adding bits of ply till the bike was higher.

I then bought a bike lift for about £100. It's great. I understand that places like Home Depot and Costco in the states sell them for pretty much the $100 mark?

you do need space to store it, but mine sits on it's end against a wall
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
...if you have trouble getting it up on the centerstand,try a bit of wood under the front or back wheel which makes it Soo much easier... Obvously,in the garage,you can leave it in place but when out & about,it'll be a good idea to have a block of wood in case the grounds soft due to heat/mud... use it under the side stand/centerstand!Cheers!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top