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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does the Triumph center stand provide enough clearance to remove the front and back wheels? Thanks
 

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The center stand is good for removing the rear wheel. But the bike's gonna sit on the front wheel while on the stand.

I suppose if you could support the front end by suspending the handlebars from the ceiling with a rope... then you could remove the front wheel as well.
 

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I used a floor jack under the frame and lifted the front wheel off the ground until the rear wheel touches the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Didn't make myself clear. I didn't mean both wheels at once. One at a time. Sorry
 

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That's what I did. Raise up the front with a floor jack under the front part of the frame, and it will pivot on the centerstand until the rear wheel touches the ground, then the front wheel is off the ground. I did this when I pulled my forks to install gaiters. Worked great.
 

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I recently installed a centerstand on my bonnie. It appear's to be positioned somewhat slightly more towards the rear of the bike than on say...a 79 bonneville.

You will need a jack or something similar to lift the front wheel...
 

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Here's a writeup I sent to (??) several months ago when asked the same question.

Bob
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Replacing tires on bikes with centerstands

I hate this job ... replacing wheels after having new tires mounted. But I discovered a way of using my motorcycle frame jack in combination with the center stand on my T100 to make it easier to align the axle holes in the wheels with swingarm and fork tube holes. This procedure also seems to make it easier to remove the wheels.

Picture the bike with both wheels removed, supported by the center stand in the rear, and the hydraulic motorcycle frame jack in the front.

I first replaced the rear tire. Since I used the fat 150/70 Dunlop 501 on the rear, I needed lots of clearance to get the tire under the fender, so, with bike on center stand, I carefully lowered the front of the frame with the jack. (My jack will not go so low as to allow the bike to 'ride' off the center stand - that would be bad - next time, for safety's sake, I will use a strong nylon strap to hold the centerstand in place). Since the bike pivots on the center stand, lowering the front (with front wheel removed) raised the rear end, giving me clearance. Once I’ve positioned the fat 150 tire and wheel in place, I began using the jack to slowly (very small increments) raise the front of the bike, which in turn dropped the rear swingarm until all the holes in the swingarm and wheel lined up, permitting me to slide the axle into place.

Same for replacing the front wheel/tire. Pivot the front up using the jack. Then carefully lower until holes in fork tubes and wheel line up, and replace the front spindle. You may find it easier to drop the bike past the alignment point, then use the hydraulic jack to raise the bike and bring all the holes into alignment. The jack is much more controllable when raising it instead of lowering it.

Using this approach, you can concentrate on getting the calipers and spacers in place, instead of trying to do all that while also lifting the tire and wheel.

A scissors jack in the front would work as well (or better) than the large hydraulic frame jack., since it would be easy to control up and down movements by fractions of an inch .....
 

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Rear wheel without question. Front wheel will need to be lifted from the ground. It would put the bike in a precarious position of balance to have them both off at the same time. A good floor jack is your best bet. I like the center stand for washings and chain maintenance.
 
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