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"In addition, the catalytic converter can be permanently damaged if the motorcycle is allowed to run out of fuel or if the fuel level is allowed to get very low. Always make sure you have adequate fuel for your journey."

After reading this in the Owner's Handbook (pg 50), how is running out or low of gas going to damage the catalytic converter?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The fuel pump could momentarily draw air causing the engine to experience a sporadic misfire condition resulting in possible damage to the catalytic converter.
 

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Yes a misfire might damage the catalytic converter or get it even hotter than usual to the point of melting the internals, but who would ever know? I would be more worried about the fuel pump running dry and suffering damage through lack of lubrication. The alarmists that write the manual have a mindset that says every potential mishap should be blamed on the owner even if that means being imaginative and economical on technical accuracy.
 

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I was wondering what all these metal parts strewn all over my yard were. Thought they fell from the sky from passing jet liners.
 

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The fuel pump could momentarily draw air causing the engine to experience a sporadic misfire condition resulting in possible damage to the catalytic converter.
Nah, if the pump sucks air, the engine has no fuel to burn and can't really cause any damage if the engine just bogs. I've never killed an engine through fuel starvation but I imagine you probably wouldn't run it that low anyway.
 

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The catalytic converter will also be seriously damaged if you remove it, replace it with an X-pipe, and then throw the cat as far as you can, over the back fence and into the neighbor's yard.
I highly recommend this method of damaging the cat!!! >:)
 

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Yes a misfire might damage the catalytic converter or get it even hotter than usual to the point of melting the internals, but who would ever know? I would be more worried about the fuel pump running dry and suffering damage through lack of lubrication. The alarmists that write the manual have a mindset that says every potential mishap should be blamed on the owner even if that means being imaginative and economical on technical accuracy.
In my experience, the people that write those manuals don't have a lot of technical knowledge. They gather information from engineers and put it in the form of a manual. The engineers don't always spend a lot of time explaining things so the writers have to use some judgment. If they got a note that says "running the bike low on fuel could damage the cat," a sensible writer might think to make that a highlighted warning. They haven't tested it. They have no idea how much of such abuse they can take or what the probability is such a thing could cause damage. They got the message not to do it and want you to know.
Hell, they still write manuals about breaking in engines like it's 1907 and that's the final step in machining the internals.
 

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The catalytic converter has a finite life, X number of miles. If damaging means consuming some of its life, I would say that riding the bike damages the cat!!!
 

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The catalytic converter has a finite life, X number of miles. If damaging means consuming some of its life, I would say that riding the bike damages the cat!!!
Running them outside a stoich mix is not good and everyone these days puts a tuner on their bike.
I had an RX-8 that hated to start in the cold. Shop put a richer map in it that fried the cats in the matter of a few days and cost Mazda about $800. Still wouldn't start in the cold...
 
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