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Hi folks

I don't own a Triumph currently, but love all of the current Bonneville range. I'm really tempted by the Street Twin and the T100. One thing holding me back is my desire to do some weekend camping trips with my wife. We're not experienced on the bike or with lightweight camping, but I think we can get there. My biggest question is whether the bike will have space to handle all that luggage with a pillion too.

Gear-wise it'll be a fairly compact tent, sleeping mats and sleeping bags, mini gas stove and pans, spare cloths, wash gear, and hiking boots perhaps.

If any of you have photos of your set up I'd be really keen to see them. I don't personally like some of the luggage racks that create a shelf at the rear - I think they spoil the look of the bike when there's no luggage on them. So, if anybody knows one which is more sleek or even quick to remove, I'd love to hear your suggestions.

However, I'm so tempted by the bike I may well just get one anyway and have to find an approach that works for us.


Cheers
Rich
 

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You can tour on anything. This is my 2014, loaded up for a camping trip. Was a blast on the twin


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Yep, the Bonneville is an extremely capable motorcycle to take long haul extended roads trips on... as importantly, a lot of fun too!!! :doublethumb



Bob
 

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But ...

Camping gear *and* pillion? (meaning, two set of cloths, two bags, two pads, etc).

And, not experienced on bike or with camping. The camping part isn't such a big deal, it just takes a couple outings to figure out what you brought and didn't need, and what you needed and didn't bring. But, for an inexperienced rider especially, you're looking at managing a pretty heavy load on the bike, and probably a top-heavy load.


Not saying "don't do it!", just pointing out the issues. I figure a motorcycle "adventure" means having some fun, but also running into some hardship and handling it well. With the attitude that anything that results in a good story is worth doing. You may be signing up for more adventure than fun :)

I'd consider a small trailer. That's been done before on a Bonnie with success. Actually, that's my second choice. First I'd consider a second bike for wife. That solves several problems, you can gear up comfortably without worrying about overloading.

I'm heading out Wednesday for a 9 day trip with wife. Each on our own Bonnie. It works out quite well that way, I assure you :D
 

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Before I answer, let me say I no longer have my beloved bonnie which I camped with. RIP. The bonnie is a good platform to camp with, with a few conditions. It is not a big high powered touring bike, so getting out and running at speed with a heavy load is asking a lot of it. It is a great city bike, an acceptable road trip bike and a marginal, at best, two up camping bike. That being said, people do it and have fun. It's not GS or and Electra Glide, so don't expect that and you may get along. Before you buy one, test ride one two up and see if you can deal with the weight knowing it will get worse with gear. More weight on the back means rear suspension compression, wiggle and a lighter front end if you load behind the rear wheel. I did a fair bit of solo plus gear and loved it. Two bikes sounds like the best advice for many reasons.
 

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Wife refuses to use communicators. She does not want my voice in her helmet. The silent days probably prevents a lot of conflict :D
Wise, very wise.

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Wife refuses to use communicators.
She is one smart lady... :nod My kind of gal... :doublethumb

Personally I despise communicators. I see no purpose for them and it is no different, in my opinion, than being a distracted driver on their damn smartphone. I have never had a problem communicating with hand signals to a fellow rider what I want or need to do. We all know people that are engaged in conversation with their fellow riders or taking Bluetoothed cell phone calls. Just a distraction that you don't need while riding your motorcycle... Again, in my opinion.

Now get off my f*cking lawn... :geezer

Bob
 

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My Dad (80yo) and I have taken many trips and always use communicators. It is a comfort and safety asset. We may go for an hour or more without saying a word, but when you need to coordinate in traffic or for directions, you can't beat it. Not to mention it is really easy to initiate a stop for some reason. Or, say "Watch that guy to your left, he's drifting into your lane." To keep this on topic... I was on my bonnie and we were roadtripping. ??
 

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Camping

I have been motorcycle camping on a number of different bikes and all were great fun. The one bike that stands out would be the Yamaha Super Tenere due to it could handle a lot of gear, 110 hp to the rear wheel and you couldn't even tell you were carrying the extra weight. Even my Harley did OK but didn't like climbing the Adirondack Mountains fully loaded. I packed my 2018 speedmaster up the other night with full camping gear and took her for a 100 mile day which was to work and back, she did great. All my gear weighs in at 45lbs including a four man tent, cart, sleeping bag, sleeping mat, cooking gear chair and more. Still less weight than two up riding. Rok straps are the best for strapping everything down just make sure you get the full 1” wide ones. Here are some pictures of my bikes fully loaded with pretty much the same gear.
 

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