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Concerning the fork tubes, they are going to resist warp because they are tubes. Tubes inherently are very resistant to warping due to heat; unlike a solid piece of metal, which can warp when heated due to variations in thermal energy along its length and diameter. Anyway, the powder coating process only bakes at 400 degrees F for 20 minutes. That temperature is not high enough to temper high quality aluminum, so you should be fine. I'll let you know if my forks snap in half though :)
Couple more questions on the forks - were there any issues with the forks getting slightly thicker due to the coating? They fit back in the trees fine? Anything to make sure doesn't get coated for reassembly?
 

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Discussion Starter · #163 ·
They will definitely gain some diameter. How much depends on how thick the powder coater lays it on, and how many coats they do. The guy that did mine did it really thick. I pried open (slightly) the ears on the lower triple clamp with a flat-blade screw driver (stick it in and twist to spread it open). I did this one side at a time and slid the tube into place, then did the other side. For the top triple clamp, I had to wedge a screw driver between the ears on each side so it would slide down on the tubes. It wasn't difficult at all.

Make sure the threads on the inside of the tubes don't get coated. The guy that did mine got some powder inside the tube, including a little bit on the threads, and on the bushing surface. He had tried to tape around the inside, so it wasn't much. I didn't bother trying to remove the powder from the threads because it wasn't much, so thickness wasn't an issue, but I did sand it off the bushing surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #164 · (Edited)
I'm going to post this last build update quickly detailing all the remaining work I've done, with a few pictures, then I'll post several posts with pictures of the (almost) final product.

I finished all the major work and most of the minor work, including building brackets and spacers, finishing the electrical work, sanding the front turn signal brackets to a brushed finish, mounting the front turn signals, mounted a headlight from a Moto Guzzi Griso (ordered from Moto Guzzi), running all the wires, throttle cables, clutch cable, brake lines, mounting the brakes and filling them with fluid, finished the metalwork on the exhaust and mounted it, built a bracket with a rubber stopper so the center stand would not hit the exhaust, finished the metalwork on the hidden rear fender (it's there to protect the underside of the seat and all the stuff behind the engine) and sprayed it with a tough rubberized metallic black coating. I put the finishing touches on the front fender, including hand-made aluminum brackets, sanding the polished aluminum fender to make it brushed, and clear-coating it. I didn't like that the full headlight amperage draw was running through the headlight switch, so I wired in a small relay. Now the switch controls the relay, which switches the current back and forth between the high and low beam circuits. There's probably some other stuff I forgot about.

oh yea, I also reprogrammed the pcm with tuneECU. Really sweet software. I don't remember where I bought my ftdi cable, but I did buy it super cheap and it works perfectly.

rear fender:


my mounting brackets for the front fender:




My relay addition:
 

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Discussion Starter · #165 ·
Finally, the Ashton Technica Chimera #01

This is my (almost) final product (I have two small additions which I will add on Saturday). I also need to adjust the oil level in the fork tubes, and I'm going to replace half of it with 5wt, so it will be around 7.5wt oil It's perfect for racing, but too stiff for street. I test rode it last night and today, and it is sweet. I also gave it to my wife last night as a gift. She didn't know how to react! She has told me several times she loves just watching me work on crafting parts with my hands. She didn't know it was all for her.

This is going to be posted in three posts due to the 10 picture per post limit.

These pics were taken in 20MP 16:9, then reduced in size to 25% for easier viewing on here. Then I realized the forum reduces the size even smaller than that anyway. Don't forget you can click on the picture header bar to increase the size a little bit anyway. You can also click on the photobucket link in the first post of this thread, where you can view larger images. I also have these all in RAW format, full size; for those of you who have asked to use the pictures elsewhere.

What it looked like new:



What it looked like when I bought it a few months ago:


What it looks like now:















 

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Discussion Starter · #172 ·
How did you wire up the speedometer? With mine I had to run a GPS speedo since I could use the speedo drive. How dies the newer vdo speedo pick up how fast your going? Once again, epic job!
The VDO gauges use an inductive pickup that senses the revolution of the transmission output shaft. Fully electronic, this is how cars have been doing it for many, many years. I'm glad triumph went to this, as it is MUCH easier to work with.
 

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Very Cool!
 

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Hey Mad...that bike is a superb piece of vision, engineering and construction......well done mate:bow
 
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