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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I haven't seen anything like this posted on here so I figured I'd post up my brake upgrade that I completed tonight.

After scouring the web for possible replacements I found this page and figured i'd give it a go... http://www.hawkgtforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=13562

I picked up a Nissin 3-piston caliper from an (euro only) 07 CBF1000 from ebay.co.uk for $75 US. The caliper bolts right up and took maybe an hour to get on there with me taking my sweet time.

I only had time to give it a quick test around the 'hood, but initial impressions are positive. I'd guess maybe a 15-20% increase in stopping power, and much improved feel. Braking felt more progressive vs. on-off experienced with the stock 2-piston job. I have stock pads on both the stock and 3-piston caliper so should see more improvement with better pads, braided lines, etc. I have a very small bit of spongyness in the lever so I'll give it another go of bleeding the lines tomorrow, and post back after I have had a chance to give it a more thorough test. If nothing else I definitely got some "BLING" out of the upgrade!

Here's the pics...







 

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If it works well it is a great up grade. Keep us posted as to how it works.
 

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Try one of these ttp://www.toolsource.com/brake-bleeding-06820-p-65745.html?osCsid=hi8f57tisc1h93phqqoqmivp25 to bleed your brakes. Nice job wonder if a floating rotor would make it even better.
 

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Nice!!! Any idea of the weight difference between the stock and the 3 pot??
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Try one of these ttp://www.toolsource.com/brake-bleeding-06820-p-65745.html?osCsid=hi8f57tisc1h93phqqoqmivp25 to bleed your brakes. Nice job wonder if a floating rotor would make it even better.
That's actually the box for my mityvac in the last pic. :) The vac works great, but was getting late and I am lazy. I decided to let it sit overnight to let any air bubbles consolidate, and flush the system today.

On the ride to work this AM I'd put the improvement around 15% stopping power, but initial grab is much better than the stock caliper. I still feel a small bit of sponge in the lever so will be bleeding it for sure tonight.
 

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That's actually the box for my mityvac in the last pic. :) The vac works great, but was getting late and I am lazy. I decided to let it sit overnight to let any air bubbles consolidate, and flush the system today.

On the ride to work this AM I'd put the improvement around 15% stopping power, but initial grab is much better than the stock caliper. I still feel a small bit of sponge in the lever so will be bleeding it for sure tonight.
a simple trick for the lazy brake bleeder:

pull the lever down all the way and zip tie it to the grip overnight. Overnight the air bubbles rise up to the reservoir.
 

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Will this work for the rear wheel as well?
 

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I doubt it....the rear brake is operated by foot control. Anything you do to the lever would have no effect on it ;)

I guess you could stack a few bricks on it. or tie it down and use a floor jack...or sumptin'
 

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I doubt it....the rear brake is operated by foot control. Anything you do to the lever would have no effect on it ;)
I meant swapping out the caliper for the 3 piston caliper.... :p

Just had the bike in for safety inspection, have had it for 1 year, 7500 miles on it, and the rear brake was down to the metal.... front brake is half-way... I use the rear a lot to level the bike in turns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I meant swapping out the caliper for the 3 piston caliper.... :p

Just had the bike in for safety inspection, have had it for 1 year, 7500 miles on it, and the rear brake was down to the metal.... front brake is half-way... I use the rear a lot to level the bike in turns.
It may work, but from looking at the rear setup I seriously doubt it.

One nice side effect of the better front brake is that I am not relying nearly as much on the rear brake or engine braking for that matter.

Although that seems to exaggerate the front end dive from the front springs so I guess I need to deal with that now! ;)

Not sure you'd want too much more braking from the rear though unless you are trying to lock it up. HH pads would probably suffice.

Also quick update on the upgrade... got the air out of the line and have noticed a little bit of additional improvement in feel/power. Also done a few hard stops to mate the pads to the calipers, etc and two finger stops are much less work on the ole fingers. To compare with the stock caliper both with stock pads - Being very critical of both I'd give the stock 2-piston a 3/10 rating and the 3-piston 5/10. I am thinking better pads will get me to 6/10.

For reference 10/10 would be latest and greatest brembo radial dual disk setup, with HH pads, etc, etc, blah, blah...

I'd assume the aftermarket 4 and 6 piston offerings will get you in the 8/10 range??? as far as braking performance. But I am happy with going from a 3/10 to 6/10 for about $100 in caliper and pads.
 

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Will this work for the rear wheel as well?
I don't think it will. The brake line dips down to the swingarm after leaving the calliper. The air will settle in the highest part of the line.

FrankW
 

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It may work, but from looking at the rear setup I seriously doubt it.

One nice side effect of the better front brake is that I am not relying nearly as much on the rear brake or engine braking for that matter.

Although that seems to exaggerate the front end dive from the front springs so I guess I need to deal with that now! ;)

Not sure you'd want too much more braking from the rear though unless you are trying to lock it up. HH pads would probably suffice.

Also quick update on the upgrade... got the air out of the line and have noticed a little bit of additional improvement in feel/power. Also done a few hard stops to mate the pads to the calipers, etc and two finger stops are much less work on the ole fingers. To compare with the stock caliper both with stock pads - Being very critical of both I'd give the stock 2-piston a 3/10 rating and the 3-piston 5/10. I am thinking better pads will get me to 6/10.

For reference 10/10 would be latest and greatest brembo radial dual disk setup, with HH pads, etc, etc, blah, blah...

I'd assume the aftermarket 4 and 6 piston offerings will get you in the 8/10 range??? as far as braking performance. But I am happy with going from a 3/10 to 6/10 for about $100 in caliper and pads.
Thanks for the great info on the caliper, EBC FA388HH is the P/n for this caliper, EBC has a new compound, Extreme Pro, EPFA388HH, which EBC claim is better than the HH compound.
I switched from EBC HH compound pads to SBS HS compound pads, also had been considering buying Beringer or Pretech 6 piston calipers but the switch to SBS HS compound pads has changed my mind as this compound has much better initial bite and stopping power than the EBC HH compound. Soon I will try the SBS RS compound.

Regarding front springs for your Thruxton, Progressive suspension recommend the use of #11-1126 (35/50lbs/inch, 0.63/0.89kg/mm)for the Thruxton and Bonneville, I fitted the #11-1145 (40/65lbs/in, 0.71/1.16kg/mm) springs to my Thruxton, these are the same spring rate as the Ikon Thruxton springs and are much less expensive than the the Ikon springs. Both these springs are 18 inch long and the 11-1145 springs are the ones reccomended for the Speedmaster/America. I use 2 inch spacers with the 11-1145 springs.
Progressive Suspensions also have another set of springs that will fit the Bonneville/Thruxton/Scrambler/SM/America, #11-1122 which are 20 inches long with a rate 45/70 pounds/inch, 0.80/1.25 kg/mm, also # 11-1152 @ 20.5 inches long with a rate 35/80 lb/inch, .63/1.46 kg/mm.

Hope this information helps....... http://www.progressivesuspension.com/pdfs/7100-105.pdf

Cheers...........Agro
 

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I meant swapping out the caliper for the 3 piston caliper.... :p

Just had the bike in for safety inspection, have had it for 1 year, 7500 miles on it, and the rear brake was down to the metal.... front brake is half-way... I use the rear a lot to level the bike in turns.
I think he was talking about Sweat's brake bleeding tip.
 

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I meant swapping out the caliper for the 3 piston caliper.... :p

Just had the bike in for safety inspection, have had it for 1 year, 7500 miles on it, and the rear brake was down to the metal.... front brake is half-way... I use the rear a lot to level the bike in turns.
A 3 pot on the rear is overkill...I can drag my rear tire with the 2-pot, so there's little to gain by increasing brake pad area.

I would suspect your rear brake is dragging on the pads if you only got 7,500 miles out of a set of pads. Many folks have trouble with corrosion on the rear calipers, so I'd ensure the piston is returning properly when you fit new pads.

Cheers,

--Rich
 
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