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I was able to confirm at the Birmingham UK show that the engine is a development of the venerable Rotax 652cc unit that had been modified to comply with the latest emissions standards - and also to evoke the shape of the original BSA engines. This also explains the water cooling!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was able to confirm at the Birmingham UK show that the engine is a development of the venerable Rotax 652cc unit that had been modified to comply with the latest emissions standards - and also to evoke the shape of the original BSA engines. This also explains the water cooling!
Shamelessly lifted off of the internet:

"A great deal has changed over the whole BMW range since the introduction of the Funduro in 1994; quite apart from offering motorcycles with 4 cylinders across the frame, oil cooling, chain and belt drives there have been several changes in production and manufacturing location. Originally all the singles including the Funduro, Strada, Dakar and the belt-drive CS were built by Aprilia alongside their own Pegaso model, all fitted with the Austrian made Rotax 652cc engine. Rotax has been owned since 1970 by Bombardier Recreational Products of Canada, famous for its snow-mobiles and Evinrude and Johnson outboard engines. In 2009 production of the 652cc 4-stroke single was switched to the Loncin factory in China, but BMW quickly became aware of the quality problems associated with outsourcing, and manufacture was repatriated to the factory at Spandau, Berlin for the 2011 G650GS model . The Spandau facility was built in 1897 by Siemens GmbH on a 200ha site to bring together a number of different products including electrical switchgear and cables, a car factory, and airship and aero engine manufacture. The site also provided a township for workers together with transport infrastructure and was named Siemensstadt at the time. It was reorganized in 1936 as Brandenburgische Motorenwerke GmbH, known as Bramo and merged with BMW in 1939 for the production of the air-cooled, 14-cylinder radial 801 aero engine based on the Bramo 139. The BMW 801 powered the twin-engined Junkers Ju88 and also one of the most successful fighter aircraft of WW2, the Focke-Wulf Fw190. Motorcycle production started at Spandau in 1969 and on 6 May 2011 the 2,000,000th bike was produced. Today the 652cc water-cooled single continues to be manufactured at BMW Spandau under license from Rotax/Bombardier and is fitted to the current G650GS and Sertoa models."
 

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If you never rode a GOOD running big single cylinder motorcycle do yourself a favor and try one before you knock em. The torque is what it’s all about.
I’ve had lots of bikes over the years and my favorites are big single cylinder bikes.
I hope this BSA example lights a firecracker under Triumph’s rear end along with other brands to make some more GOOD thumpers as well.
 

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^ I think BSA (Mahindra) is in direct competition with Royal Enfield... should be fun, I wonder if his lordship Stuart Fillingham will be switching bandwagons again :ROFLMAO:
That Gold Star 650 looks the part much more than that horrible Brixton 1200 thing (imho of course)
I was having such a nice day until you mentioned "you know who".
 

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If you never rode a GOOD running big single cylinder motorcycle do yourself a favor and try one before you knock em. The torque is what it’s all about.
I’ve had lots of bikes over the years and my favorites are big single cylinder bikes.
I hope this BSA example lights a firecracker under Triumph’s rear end along with other brands to make some more GOOD thumpers as well.
BSA 441 Victor dirt bike.
 

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I always like to see new offerings in the motorcycle world. But I don't know that I would put my money out for a single. Besides, it is kind of "frumpy" looking by today's standards. ...J.D.
 

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Or a Ducati 450 Desmo RT... the REAL Scrambler

View attachment 772031
<sarcasm> Surely that can't be a REAL Ducati without an "L" twin & a trellis frame? </sarcasm>

Thats my kinda scrambler... purposeful, not one of those awkward looking hipster "reimaginings" that use a Honda 750/4 engine complete with knobbly tyres and a brown seat (y)
 

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I always like to see new offerings in the motorcycle world. But I don't know that I would put my money out for a single. Besides, it is kind of "frumpy" looking by today's standards. ...J.D.
I agree with the first part but perversely, the frumpiness is actually what appeals to me! @retjustdad53 started a great, thought provoking thread about motorcycle downsizing and this new BSA could be the thing if/when that time comes for me.

This bike is lighter and produces more power & more torque, lower in the rev range than the RE Interceptor 650. Also, from the photos, it looks a bit less budget than it too.
 

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For a 650, why didn’t they bring back the Lightning, but as a 1200?
I suppose they could have but I guess with this they feel they are bringing something unique to the marketplace... a retro styled 650 single, I applaud them wanting to do something different. Maybe the Lightning may follow if this is a success? That'd shake things up a bit!
 

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Interestingly the bikes on show at the NEC are preproduction models, the company are currently looking for premises in/near Birmingham to begin mass production.
This particular USP is something Triumph threw away and the modern Royal Enfield models never had. Sure, they have 'design' centres staffed with specialist British employees but their mass production bikes are no longer 'Made in Britain' and for some that will count for a lot when it comes to emptying wallets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Have just one exposure to a "thumper", the 1974 Honda XL-250 I bought new and used for primary transportation during college years. What a GREAT bike. It was utterly reliable and had a great sound. I remember the start drill to this day: fuel on and fling your body into the air for two kicks to prime. It would invariably start on the third kick. Traded it for my first large bike, a new Honda CB750 K4, also a great machine. There have been eight bikes since these, but the pattern was set: four stroke mid-weight street machines with minimal or no modification.

I will look carefully at the new BSA if it makes it to American shores, which is not assured by any means.
 
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