Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

21 - 30 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I'm going to be stationed in Japan in about 3 months and I'm bringing my Thruxton with me. Someone in my command mentioned this site: www.motofoot.co.jp/english/services.html It looks like they'll do it all for you.(brakes, emissions, registration) If you're in Atsugi (where I'm going) you'll be lucky because it's only about 6 miles away and they have trucking services. I'll try to keep you guys filled in on the process once I get there... I'm going to start by contacting Triumph to get the 'COC' as mentioned in an earlier post.

Also... Kingtama, how do you get in touch with this 'Sato San' in case this MotoFoot thing doesn't work out?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Sato owns motofoot. When you get here his Cell number is 09032056056.

I got my brake cert from the Triumph main office in Japan. I called/emailed England first and they sent my email to the guy that takes care of it in Japan.

All I had to do was fax the customs form you get and a copy of the titel and three days later I got the sticker to put on my frame in the mail. Then I gave my bike to Sato and when he brought it back to the base I rode it home 100% complete.


I'm going to be stationed in Japan in about 3 months and I'm bringing my Thruxton with me. Someone in my command mentioned this site: www.motofoot.co.jp/english/services.html It looks like they'll do it all for you.(brakes, emissions, registration) If you're in Atsugi (where I'm going) you'll be lucky because it's only about 6 miles away and they have trucking services. I'll try to keep you guys filled in on the process once I get there... I'm going to start by contacting Triumph to get the 'COC' as mentioned in an earlier post.

Also... Kingtama, how do you get in touch with this 'Sato San' in case this MotoFoot thing doesn't work out?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Motofoot is a good shop. I recommend him to many guys from that area and I use Garage134 in the Yokosuka area. I also have a club in the Yokosuka area that meets and does runs all around the Kanagawa area. If you're interested shoot me an email.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Brake Certification

Checked the mail today and there was a letter from Triumph Japan with the brake sticker! I sent a letter to the UK (see picture) using the address on this site (http://www.triumph.co.uk/uk/6801.aspx). 3 weeks later I got the letter in the picture. So if you know you're going to Japan I'd send a similar letter to Triumph UK. Great customer service!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I brought my 2009 Speed Triple with me to Japan and went through the pain to get it registered. Now I am going through the red tape to bring the bike back to the US with me. Has anyone that posted in this thread had to get the EPA Certificate of Conformity done? Triumph USA is saying it isn't necessary, but TMO says it is. There have been no mods done to my engine to change emissions.
Any experience with this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Finally!

For those who have been waiting I'm sorry it took so long. After getting deployed as soon as I got here it took me a while to get everything taken care of.

First off, before you ship your bike, coat it in a mist of some sort of rust inhibitor (WD-40 would probably work). My bike got delivered, and since there are very few places available over here with garages, my bike got a little corrosion on it while I was at sea; I had my wife put a cover on it.... HUGE mistake... I will never buy/use a bike cover ever again. Even if it says it "breathes" or has "vents"... don't do it. The front wheel was the worst part since the cover just held in all the humidity and heat. I got it cleaned up pretty well but it took a lot of time and elbow grease.

Since there aren't many places with garages (even less on base, i.e. none) I went out and bought an aluminum framed tarp garage you put together yourself. I bought it from a place called 'Viva Home'. There a few of these stores around and other places sell similar things. Not very cheap but not too expensive either but definitely worth it. Its got a zip up front cover and keeps the bike dry and I can open it up to keep the heat and moisture from building up.

Ok so back to getting your bike here and riding it!

1) Make sure when you get your house hold goods (i.e. your bike) you (or your wife) gets the import form specifically for your bike. When I got back from deployment after my HHG got here we didn't get the right customs form from the movers... only the customs form that has everyone else's HHG on it. You need to get a customs form that specifically declares your motorcycle. See the pictures below.

If you didn't get this document you'll have to go to the on base move office (not the housing office) I can't remember the proper name for this office. When you get there you'll have to request them to contact the import agency and apply for the customs declaration... it takes about a week to come in.

2) You should also at this point consider signing up for a motorcycle course over at Yokohama North Dock (some obscure Army base where they have Army troop boats). Contact your safety office, get onto ESAMS and sign up for a course... don't forget your permission slip from your supervisor before you go to the course. You can rent a bike from Moto Foot and he'll have the bike waiting for you at the course when you get there. You won't be able to use your bike unless it's been all set up for Japan and you'll have to have it towed there. Once you take the course, go to the licensing office and have them give you a new license that permits you to ride a motorcycle.

3)Once you get your customs form you'll have to bring this, some sort of proof of ownership (title, copy of lease/title etc), a document stating when exactly the vehicle was manufactured (depending on the date, you may be grandfathered from noise restrictions and maybe even emissions but that would be for very old bikes), and a document stating the horsepower, engine size and gear ratio of the bike. The book received from Triumph will work for this.

All of these things can be handed to Sato at Moto Foot (his English is pretty good) and he will do the leg work of bringing your bike to the inspection place for emissions, braking and possibly noise levels. He will also do the adjustments necessary to get your bike into standards at the minimum cost to you.

Be advised that minimum cost does not mean cheap. The emission's test alone cost 94,500 yen, add in about 2,500yen for licensing and registration, 18,860 for JCI insurance, 2,500yen for a Japanese title, 7,500yen for an oil change, $15 or so for the base inspection, Sato obviously has to make some money and some more for road tax, weight tax, and liability insurance you're looking around $3000 total! God that hurts!

What's even worse, Sato had never had to mess with a Triumph Twin so it took about 6months to complete! In order to pass emissions he has to either put catalytic converters in the exhaust at certain points or get a power commander. It just took that long to find the right amount and position of catalytic converters in the pipes. So lucky you, if you bring your EFI Bonni over he'll be able to get you out the door much much sooner. Mine was an extreme case, most people get there bikes back a few weeks later.

In the files below there is a pdf of the instructions the base gave me when I got here, most of it is stuff that Sato will do for you but still helpful.

4) So once Sato finishes with your bike he'll meet you on base at the Vehicle Registration Office (VRO), you'll need to have your liability insurance on the bike (you can get this on base), you'll go over to the shop on base and have them do their base inspection, he takes the inspection sheet, and bike and goes to get road tax (little blue sticker that he'll put on your plate) for you and I believe your license plate out in town. He'll bring it back for the last time a few days later... meanwhile go to the VRO (on base Vehicle Registration Office) and get your on base sticker (which is also your road tax sticker). Put the sticker on your bike (most people put it on the RIGHT fork) and you are finally ready to ride.

You could probably do all of the stuff Sato does your self but it would be difficult to find your way around Japan, transport your bike, converse with the inspection people and on top of all that if you fail the emissions test twice, you have to pay for another (Sato gets around this by doing the work in his shop, running it on his dyno and emissions machine before going). You'll also have to do all the modifications yourself if they're required.

I'll be honest, I love my Thruxton, but I should've just put it in storage and bought a bike here and sold it when I left. After all this it wasn't really worth the hassel (or the money). But I am glad i got it done and I can ride this awesome machine on the twisty rider friendly roads of Japan.

If anyone has some questions, PM me and I'll do my best to help.

***The first picture shows the customs form we got that was incorrect, the second two are the proper form, the third is Moto Foot's Card, 4th-finally went riding!***
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Been there...

I've already ben through the process of bringing my Speed Triple to Japan and back. No major issues, just lots of paperwork. I'm glad I brought that beast to the mainland. Lots of good riding in the mountains around Tokyo. I didn't have a chance to ride up north, though.
 
21 - 30 of 30 Posts
Top