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Discussion Starter #61
Well in time there may be a market for this sort of repair. There already is a small cottage industry of people who repair the “video game” displays of cars built in the 80-90s.
That is a good point, hopefully someone will come up with some sort of 'universal' ECU.
 

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Isn't shift assist pretty much the same as what Honda were fitting to their cub 50's years ago, basically a semi auto gearbox in other words, a lot of buses use them don't you know.
I'm with you I think a lot of this tech stuff will dumb down riders. Perhaps it's the way forward, as mentioned in another thread humans are basically still apes. Maybe in the future everything will be bright and rosie and everyone will be travelling around as passengers using self driving bikes and cars. I can't see it though not for a long time yet.
What do you mean by shift assist? The quick shifter that is employed on a lot of sport bikes these days is kind of fun, especially those that rev match by auto blipping the throttle on down shift. The clutch and foot shifter are still there if you want to do it yourself.

But really, we have been able to upshift for years with standard bike transmissions. One of the rider coaches at a track school I attended, commented that he hadn’t used the clutch for up shifts in a couple of decades, and never lost a gearbox.

On a modern sport bike, the rev matching is one feature I would like to have above the lean angle sensors and such. That stuff insulates you too much and keeps you from making mistakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #63 (Edited)
What do you mean by shift assist? The quick shifter that is employed on a lot of sport bikes these days is kind of fun, especially those that rev match by auto blipping the throttle on down shift. The clutch and foot shifter are still there if you want to do it yourself.

But really, we have been able to upshift for years with standard bike transmissions. One of the rider coaches at a track school I attended, commented that he hadn’t used the clutch for up shifts in a couple of decades, and never lost a gearbox.

On a modern sport bike, the rev matching is one feature I would like to have above the lean angle sensors and such. That stuff insulates you too much and keeps you from making mistakes.
I'm referring back to a post by wastedmerc, I've never ridden with one but apparently BMW, bless them, have designed something called 'Gear shift assist pro' from what I can make out the idea is that you can go through the gears up or down without backing off the throttle or using the clutch, I used to ride a Honda cub 50 pretty much like that when I was a kid last week.

Here's some techy stuff if you can be arsed to read it, I couldn't:rolleyes:


I'll edit that a bit, I did read some of it and apparently you have to back the throttle right off on the downshifts.
 

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I'm referring back to a post by wastedmerc, I've never ridden with one but apparently BMW, bless them, have designed something called 'Gear shift assist pro' from what I can make out the idea is that you can go through the gears up or down without backing off the throttle or using the clutch, I used to ride a Honda cub 50 pretty much like that when I was a kid last week.
Triumph had this on the pre-unit 650 Thunderbird, before the Honda 'bog seats' appeared. It was called the slick shift gearbox. When you changed gear, up or down, a cam on the gear lever shaft operated the clutch. The bog seat worked in a different way, it had a centrifugal clutch that forced the plates together as the revs went up. So BMW have designed zilch. Been there, done that.

Hilarious fun when I were a youngster was to rev the t1ts off a bog seat and slap it in gear. Straight up wheelie or wheelspin, depending on what ground you were on.

Yes I was a kid myself once... I think it was a tuesday...
 

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Triumph had this on the pre-unit 650 Thunderbird, before the Honda 'bog seats' appeared. It was called the slick shift gearbox. When you changed gear, up or down, a cam on the gear lever shaft operated the clutch. The bog seat worked in a different way, it had a centrifugal clutch that forced the plates together as the revs went up. So BMW have designed zilch. Been there, done that.

.

No one is saying BMW designed it. That was just one implementation.
 

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No one is saying BMW designed it. That was just one implementation.
I'm referring back to a post by wastedmerc, I've never ridden with one but apparently BMW, bless them, have designed something called 'Gear shift assist pro' from what I can make out the idea is that you can go through the gears up or down without backing off the throttle or using the clutch, I used to ride a Honda cub 50 pretty much like that when I was a kid last week.
 

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Quick shift, to me its like an auto with manual gear changer on a car, you have the option but still choose the easy choice. So no I would not be using the clutch if I wanted to once it's common for bikes to have quick shifters.
 

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Oh that. I forgot that was mentioned. I had never heard of that particular name for it, until this thread.

My sincere apologies.
 

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Discussion Starter #70
Honda 'bog seats'
Never heard one called that before :LOL:. I remember doing the the same, opening the things right up trying to get the front end up in the air. When I was a kid the real loon's amongst us would have a C90, but they were the cool kids who were trying to impress the girls.
 

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Discussion Starter #71
Boring, I want to drive the car/bus/plane/boat/submarine/bike/train/spaceship/tram/horse/ et
These days I hate driving cars, so I can see the appeal of being 'chauffeur' driven everywhere, can't see the point of doing the same on a bike though, surely the things are built for the fun of riding.
 

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These days I hate driving cars, so I can see the appeal of being 'chauffeur' driven everywhere, can't see the point of doing the same on a bike though, surely the things are built for the fun of riding.
I like driving cars, but it has to be a fun car. Automatics, SUVs, or minivans need not apply.
 

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Never heard one called that before :LOL:.
I don't know, maybe that nickname was local to this area or just me and my mates at the time, but because of the shape of the tank, when you were riding them it looked like you were sitting on the toilet.

I remember doing the the same, opening the things right up trying to get the front end up in the air. When I was a kid the real loon's amongst us would have a C90, but they were the cool kids who were trying to impress the girls.
I would be around 10 years old when we first got our hands on a bog seat. We lived on the edge of a disused airfield, there were two hangers there that were used by a gliding club (who hated us) and the runway was still there. The rest was all meadow grass and weeds. The bog seat was the predecessor of the C50, the C100 (pushrod engine). We got it in one piece but it was soon stripped of everything not needed for the fields. We rode the hell out of that bike until it fell apart, at one point it had a massive Jubilee clip around the engine holding the cylinder head on because the studs had stripped. And still it ran. It even carried 7 of us across the airfield (until someone stamped on the rear brake and we all tumbled off).

We progressed from there to C50's, C90's, a Mobilette, then I bought a scrap Puch M125. That would die suddenly due to the magneto flywheel coming off the crankshaft, so we had it welded. Not only that but various Reliant 3 wheelers, a Moggy 1000 and a Wolsey 1500 with plastic padding and sellotape holding the front wings on and large holes in the floor.
 

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It seems a sad fact of life that if you want to do well in business then you have to be a bit corrupt in some way, but perhaps that's how to get ahead in the business world. On this occasion though that nice chap Stuart Garner has fallen flat on his face, which I think is a good thing. Hopefully it will happen to a few others!
I find it interesting that no one has mentioned the pension scandel out here yet.

K
 

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Discussion Starter #77 (Edited)
We progressed from there to C50's, C90's, a Mobilette, then I bought a scrap Puch M125. That would die suddenly due to the magneto flywheel coming off the crankshaft, so we had it welded. Not only that but various Reliant 3 wheelers, a Moggy 1000 and a Wolsey 1500 with plastic padding and sellotape holding the front wings on and large holes in the floor.
Them were the days, those old C50's were bulletproof, you could go almost anywhere on one, I actually progressed to a C50 from an old Raliegh Runabout but that was just for hacking up and down muddy tracks and the like, I did have a step through Garelli at one point but the motor was pretty much shagged. Then things got serious when I bought my first real bike a Yammy Fizzy for 130 quid, can't remember what happened to that in the end, wish I kept it the things are worth a few thousand now. I also had my share of almost dead austin 1100's and a couple of escort's, but when you talk reliant 3 wheelers, man they were luxury I've had two or three of them. I've got a 4 wheeled Reliant rebel at the moment, it's a great little car but I've got to get the rear axle sorted soon, it's started to make a sound similar to one of Lars Ulrich's drum solo's.
 

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Then things got serious when I bought my first real bike a Yammy Fizzy for 130 quid, can't remember what happened to that in the end, wish I kept it the things are worth a few thousand now.
Well, by the time I left home at 19, I had £3,000 worth of fines and a 4 year ban, so I had to wait a while before I got my first bike on the road legally. That was bought (as usual) as two or three boxes of rust (£15), which took me 6 months to rebuild. They had only just bought in the 125 limit/2 part test, so although I was already an accomplished rider I had to start all over with this crap. Anyway, the bike was a rarity in the UK I believe - the Suzuki Stinger T125, smaller brother of the 200 Invader and the 250 Hustler.


There is one on eBay right now, 1971, unrestored and up for sale at £3,200. I've had a few rare(ish) Jap bikes which would be worth a bit now. Bridgestone 175, Honda FT500, as well as many British machines, more than I can remember.

I also had my share of almost dead austin 1100's and a couple of escort's, but when you talk reliant 3 wheelers, man they were luxury I've had two or three of them. I've got a 4 wheeled Reliant rebel at the moment, it's a great little car but I've got to get the rear axle sorted soon, it's started to make a sound similar to one of Lars Ulrich's drum solo's.
I never bothered with cars until the kids came along. Me and the wife would do the weekly shop on a Honda CB550/4 K1 with throw-over panniers and a top box. Then from 1985 - 2005 I drove around in Reliant 3 wheelers because I could run those on my bike licence. I've had all incarnations of those - Regal saloon, Regal estate (same as the van but with side windows), 2 Robins and a Rialto. I decided to go 4 wheels in 2005 with an old Corsa.

Yes the Rebel was the forerunner to the Kitten. Now, the Kitten was just a Robin with an altered front end to take the extra wheel, apart from that they were identical, so a rear axle from a 3 wheeler would go straight on. I wonder whether you could do the same with the Rebel. Its worth investigating. The Reliants were all 'bitsa' cars - bitsa this, bitsa that - for example the square headlamps on the Rialto were from the Bedford Rascal van. There were also quite a few Mini parts. Yeah, people laughed at the 3 wheelers but there were worse 4 wheelers on the road - Fiat 500 anyone? My 700cc Regal saloon would obliterate an 850 Mini up the motorway (I did that once and took the grin off their faces), seated 4 people and carried more than my Fiesta does now. Tax was the same as a bike and insurance virtually pennies, fuel consumption must have been around 60 mpg.
 

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Well i really hope the people affected get back their pension money and someone held accountable, and maybe, just maybe, another buyer is found for Norton. It would be a real shame for the brand to die out in this scandal
I hope you are right, but wouldn't the new owner be liable for the shortfalls in the pensions and tax owed to HMRC? If so, that amounts to millions so the new owners would need very deep pockets. Norton Motorcycles would have to be given away.
 
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