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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's one that has probably been gone countless other times. There is a conflict on my '07 with the procedure. The tank label is very conservative almost impossible. The manual states otherwise. What is the general consenous of opinon about this?
 

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i use the ride it like you stole it method. i was fairly easy on it for 50 miles and from there on out no holds barred. it worked for my s3 my rocket 3 and yamaha r1 :cool:
 

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I've always used a progressive break in for the first 1000 miles. Never any problems or oil consumption.
Hard to do but worth it.
 

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Manufacturers have more experience than most riders do. I agree that they need to 'cover their a$$', but if you know a little about mechanical issues you would realize there is more going on than just seating the rings. You need to allow time for all the rolling, wearing surfaces to 'get aquainted' (mate). If you looked under a microscope you would see how many 'mountains' exist on the surfaces of the parts. It takes time for surfaces such as gear faces and bearing races to 'seat in' because they are made of such hard material.
You can 'ride it ike you stole it' if you really want to be ignorant about what is really going on inside your engine. You may be lucky and not have any problems, but most guys don't put that many miles on their bikes before they sell them for something else.= (Before any issues may show up after long term use.)
If I spend $10 grand, I can take a little time and break in my motor properly......... Why wouldn't you??

"Ignorance is simply not knowing. Stupidity is knowing better and doing it anyway."
 

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The single most important thing is to vary the rpm quite a bit. Picture a nice easy ride on a curvy backroad; rolling on the throttle, shifting through the gears, not just a steady speed. This kind of ride is the best thing I can think of for the break in. Just stay away from big rpm, and wide open throttle for a while and it will be fine. I tend to follow the manufacturers guidelines, albeit a little loosely. Just remember that you can also be too conservative during break in. Basically, there is a "grey area" you want to land in; to little throttle, and the rings may not seat properly; and to much throttle is hard on the bottom end. To much rpm is hard on the valvetrain until it's all bedded in. This satisfies both sides of the fence. Or, just try to blow it up before the warranty expires! :-D

[ This message was edited by: StuckInKansas on 2006-12-23 23:48 ]
 

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On 2006-12-23 21:52, 3forme wrote:
You need to allow time for all the rolling, wearing surfaces to 'get aquainted' (mate). If you looked under a microscope you would see how many 'mountains' exist on the surfaces of the parts. It takes time for surfaces such as gear faces and bearing races to 'seat in' because they are made of such hard material.
"Ignorance is simply not knowing. Stupidity is knowing better and doing it anyway."
+1
 

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Manufacturer also tells between the lines:"Take it easy and do not kill or hurt yourself because we told you to load the engine pretty hard and then sue us for 5 billion dollars because we told you to twist the throttle and you were not used to a bike this powerful and it kicked you off the saddle..."

I do not believe in the feather touch break in. Either way the engine will propably run just fine. They usually hammer it in the dyno at the factory so the worst part is over when the customer gets the bike.
 

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Let's put it this way. If you don't intend to keep the bike a long time, then go ahead, ride the nuts out of it as soon as you take it out of the showroom.

If it's gonna be a keeper, then do the above and you'll regret it later on.

I will NEVER buy a used vehicle that has been trashed from the off.
 

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+1 to Avi8or.

Follow the break-in procedure. If there is a conflict then re-read it. Break the motor in conservatively. The tank label will tell you what revs to use til what mileage, but the handbook may give you some more guidance like don't bog the motor, don't over-rev, vary the revs etc.

The fast break-in is all well and good if all you are breaking in is new rings and bores. All the other stuff in the motor need to settle down as well.

Too many stories of guys breaking in motors fast - ooh look I got 5 extra bhp doing it this way. Then 12 months later the motor is drinking oil, down on power and basically worn out.
 

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You know I've seen that touted around so often. What a load of *****. No manufacturer recommends this but hey, this guy knows better.
 

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On 2006-12-24 07:34, martinyoung wrote:
You know I've seen that touted around so often. What a load of *****. No manufacturer recommends this but hey, this guy knows better.
the funny thing is that most people on this and other forums start thousands of threads blasting dealers and manufacturers about there stupidity about things like brake issues, stalling issues, ignoring problems, etc .. but there break in is gospel
 

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Don't know about that. I've not had problems with brakes, stalling or ignoring problems. After all this is the best bike in the world ever, and was created by the Almighty in His image.

However

If you read my previous reply to this post, and see my comment about the number of people that come back later and say that their engine is now suffering and they used hard break-in, it may shed a diferent light on things.

But then you, and I, will believe what we want to believe.

And yes, I always stick to the manufacturer's recommended tyer pressures.
 

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On 2006-12-24 07:30, Briank wrote:
read this avi8or

break in procedure
Motoman is one out of how many "Race Engine" builders in the world posting on breaking in an engine properly. His method may be best for racing by beyond that, his method is not appropriated for street machines that need to go miles not miles per hour. Think about it, if you do a search on the web regarding this subject, there are few "Professional engine builders" posting on breaking in engines. It's because they know their methods are for "Racing Only".
I agree with 3forme, that most people sale their bikes before knowing whether the breack in method they used is the most appropriated for long term durablility.
 

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On 2006-12-24 07:30, Briank wrote:
read this avi8or

break in procedure
Blasphemy, blasphemy! :hammer: :hammer:

No matter how well machined or finished a piece of metal will still have microscopic imperfections. Mate it with another similar piece of metal. Rub too fast and hey presto galling, welding, and localised OVERHEATING leading to ripping off chunks of metal from the surface. They will never 'mate' properly after.
Do the process smoothly and the imperfections will be smoothened off, and provided lubricant (oil) and coolant (air or water) are present the components will happily tango together for a much longer time, than if they were trashed from the beginning.
Any engineer worth his salt will tell you this.

If running in was so easy wouldn't you think that the manufacturers would supply a ready 'run-in' machine thereby eliminating the possibility of wrongly run in thrashed engines and 'boxes, and attendant warranty issues?

I have ALWAYS used the conservative method of running in and ALL my engines NEVER EVER needed even a drop of oil for top up.

Runing in means:
1 No silly revs
2 No Lugging
3 No constant speeds, close throttle frequently
4 No synths
5 Change oil no later than reccomended.

And finally DO NOT take everything you read on the net as gospel, Motoman especially.
 

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From the engineering side of things.... yes... no metal surface is perfectly smooth. Impact loading high and low spots in little metal parts is not something anyone looking into the long term should do.

Ever bike Ive ever ridden, I've taken it easy on to let everything set properly. Way I see it, its not only good for the engine, but the rider as well. I'm no professional rider by any means.... So learning a bikes power band and how it responds to different situations is just as important. Last thing I want to do is end up back in the ER cause I layed on to much throttle and didnt know how the bike responds.

Its usually best to error on the side of caution when it comes to long term performance and your own well being.
 

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My dealer told me to ignore the tank decal and manual, and just ride the ***** bike. He said babying the bike during break in is actually worse for the engine than riding it hard. That's pretty much what I've always heard and how I broke in my BMWs. So, I plan to ride it like I stole it during break in. I won't be pinning it off the red line until after the first 600 miles, but it'll get a healthy dose of high revs, varying RPMS and speeds.
 

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On 2006-12-25 10:40, Warp8 wrote:
My dealer told me to ignore the tank decal and manual, and just ride the ***** bike. He said babying the bike during break in is actually worse for the engine than riding it hard.
Your dealer has a vested interest in your future custom, when you turn up with worn out cams and valves, worn bores pistons and rings, knackered gearboxes and all the other nasties.

I tend to get a feeling from this forum that most dealers in the good ol' USA can't even properly maintain a bike let alone do major overhauls. So how come suddenly this guy it THE authority in running in!
 
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