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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
what's the proper break in period? what should be watched during this break in period? i've been told to try and keep it under 3500 rpm's for the first 200 miles. then under 5000 rpms till about 500 miles? what do you guys say?
 

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Follow the break-in procedure in the owners manual. There is also one on the tank of the bike if you bought new.

For 2006 MY
First 500 miles, avoid full throttle, constant speeds, high engine speeds (above 4500 rpm), avoid riding above 65mph.
Key here is to be light on the throttle and change engine speed and gears often.

Up to 1000 miles, work your way up to redline, don't labor the engine, no sustained high speeds, no full throttle. Basically take what you were doing up to 500 miles and progressively get more aggressive.


Now, the disclaimer. There are going to be people who say, beat the crap out of the bike from out of the box. "You need to seat the rings." This IS B.S. I work in test and development at an engine company. There is NOT ONE break-in procedure that works for all engines. Some need high load early in life, some need a light easy break-in. Unless you have done a sample of each on engines, torn them down and inspected, you have NO CLUE which is better.

You have to TRUST the engine manufacturer. Follow their break-in procedure, because they have tailored it for that specific engine. I KNOW....... I help do this on new engine programs.

And if that doesn't sway you, the worst I have seen happen from a light break-in, when the engine needs a heavy one, is that there is increased oil consumption for the first FEW hours of life. On the other hand, Ive seen pistons disintegrate, camshafts gall, valves gutter, and rod-bearings fail due to a heavy break-in.
 

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Follow the break-in procedure in the owners manual. There is also one on the tank of the bike if you bought new.

For 2006 MY
First 500 miles, avoid full throttle, constant speeds, high engine speeds (above 4500 rpm), avoid riding above 65mph.
Key here is to be light on the throttle and change engine speed and gears often.

Up to 1000 miles, work your way up to redline, don't labor the engine, no sustained high speeds, no full throttle. Basically take what you were doing up to 500 miles and progressively get more aggressive.


Now, the disclaimer. There are going to be people who say, beat the crap out of the bike from out of the box. "You need to seat the rings." This IS B.S. I work in test and development at an engine company. There is NOT ONE break-in procedure that works for all engines. Some need high load early in life, some need a light easy break-in. Unless you have done a sample of each on engines, torn them down and inspected, you have NO CLUE which is better.

You have to TRUST the engine manufacturer. Follow their break-in procedure, because they have tailored it for that specific engine. I KNOW....... I help do this on new engine programs.

And if that doesn't sway you, the worst I have seen happen from a light break-in, when the engine needs a heavy one, is that there is increased oil consumption for the first FEW hours of life. On the other hand, Ive seen pistons disintegrate, camshafts gall, valves gutter, and rod-bearings fail due to a heavy break-in.
As an Mechanical Engineer with BMW and Rotax Bombardier and working on motorcycle engines on daily basis over the last 26 years both for on and off track use I disagree with your comments above on running-in procedures... :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
yeah i hear ya on the 500 miles. i'll be checking out the manual and i guess follow it. so i guess i should avoid highway driving since that is usually at a constant speed. if on the highway i'm usually cruising around 60-70 mph which is under 4500rpms. is that bad?
 

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Follow the break-in procedure in the owners manual.
(...)
I work in test and development at an engine company. There is NOT ONE break-in procedure that works for all engines.
(...)
And if that doesn't sway you, the worst I have seen happen from a light break-in, when the engine needs a heavy one, is that there is increased oil consumption for the first FEW hours of life.
As to the first statement: user's manual says that for first 500 miles (Speed Triple 2007 "Owners Handbook", page 37):
- don't use full throttle
- avoid high engine speeds
- avoid riding at one constant engine speed
- avoid aggressive starts, stops and rapid accelerations
- do not ride at speeds greater then 3/4 of max engine speed

Because redline is at 9700 (spec -> "electronic rev limiter", page 98) then you should not exceed 7275 rpm. This means that sticker on tank is BS. Real information from Triumph engineers is in the manual.
Added: and where the heck did you find this crap about 65mph?

And to your second conclusion: what kind of engines are you helping develop? If you are working on Diesel locomotive or lawnmower engines, then your opinion - accordingly to your own words - is completely worthless. Unless your place is designing and developing motorcycle engines you have no better information then anybody else with basic mechanical knowledge. You didn't also say in what is your role in this place...

And the last statement: do the search on posts here, you will find one quite fresh that talks about burning 1 quart of oil per 1000 miles on bike with over 7000 miles. Even Triumph agreed that this was result of improper break-in and tried to remedy this by performing second break-in procedure. First few hours of life? Really?

To the original poster: I agree, follow the Triumph recommendation - in first 500 miles avoid (which doesn't mean don't do it) wringing it above 7300rpm. If you want to read something more enlightening try this:
http://www.power-tripp.com/Break-in.html

Ride it! Remove the stupid sticker and ride it!
 

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As an Mechanical Engineer with BMW and Rotax Bombardier and working on motorcycle engines on daily basis over the last 26 years both for on and off track use I disagree with your comments above on running-in procedures... :eek:
I respect your disagreement, but stand by my recommendation. Depending on the cylinder hone, ring pack, piston fit, bore arrangement, bearing tolerance, cold / hot tests completed at the factory etc. The engine requires a different break-in / early life treatment.

If you don't know these parameters or what the company recommends, the SAFEST break-in is a light one.

Added: and where the heck did you find this crap about 65mph?

And to your second conclusion: what kind of engines are you helping develop? If you are working on Diesel locomotive or lawnmower engines, then your opinion - accordingly to your own words - is completely worthless. Unless your place is designing and developing motorcycle engines you have no better information then anybody else with basic mechanical knowledge. You didn't also say in what is your role in this place...
65mph is my way of saying take it easy. Sorry, I didn't have a scanner to copy the page out of the book.

And my job title is Test & Development Engineer. I work on valvetrain and high speed rotating components for engines ranging from 3.5hp to 525hp. 1 cylinder to V8 with a heavy duty load cycle.

I have a Mechanical engineering degree, working on a Masters in engine design, have worked on boosted engines with GM, Hyundai, Chrysler. I have a bit more information than just basic mechanical knowledge. But your right....... I don't know. And unless anyone here works for Triumph in R&D, they don't know either. Heck, we have arguments at work on this subject. There is always a group of guys in the "drive it like you stole it" category and then a group of guys like me in the "play it safe" and let everything seat in category.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
i'm going to chill for the first 500 miles...7200 rpms is a lot and you can enjoy your ride just fine within those limits. so i'm cool with chilling during the break in period. thanks for all the input guys! much appreciated!!!
 

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I would recomend extra oil changes during break in, using conventional (non synthetic) oil. I changed my oil at 100 miles on the engine and it came out of the bike rather silverish. I then changed it again at 800 miles then 1600. I broke my engine in by running it with occasional bursts of throttle, but not riding it full throttle till after 1000 miles, but by no chance was i going to baby it. Fully agree that you want to get the pressure on the rings to get them to seat right, i dont burn a drop of oil between changes.
 

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To the original poster: I agree, follow the Triumph recommendation - in first 500 miles avoid (which doesn't mean don't do it) wringing it above 7300rpm. If you want to read something more enlightening try this:
http://www.power-tripp.com/Break-in.html
This is a surprisingly good article. One of the better I have read on the subject. I know now where the confusion between my definition of "light break-in" and what your point is. :D

When most of the hot-rodders, ricers, and general public I have talked to about break-ins talk "Hard Break-in". They mean start it up, bounce it off the rev-limiter while doing a wheelie, heat-cycle it by running it hard, etc.

What that article defines as a good break-in, I would call medium. Good for a delicate ring pack and non-plateau hone, that needs to be seated quickly before it glazes.

What I define as light (and sorry, I work in dyno hrs. not miles) is 25% throttle load at 1000, 2000rpm for 15minutes, then 50% load for 30min at 2500, 3000rpm. Transition to WOT and 30minutes at 500rpm increments up to peak RPM.
 

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i can give you my input....since i have broken the same bike in 3 times now.

bought the bike brand new in 07, followed the break in procedure as the owner manual states. engine made it 6k miles and spun a rod bearing. engine number 2 followed the break in as the dealer instructed me to do (same thing as the owners manual) this engine made it 1,200 miles and then put the connecting rid right thru the engine case. now on engine 3 that has 2k miles on it i broke it in as some would say a "hard break in" (mainly because i was pissed the whole time ridding the bike) and so far it hasn't used one bit of oil, made any unusual noises or left me stranded. just to make this clear im not saying that the way it was broke in was why it did or has not blown up.

every engine has its own "break in procedure" i work on semi trucks/ diesel engines for a living. i have rebuilt numerous diesel engines, one specific engine type that jumps out to me for an example is a detroit series 60 after you complete the overhaul, start it let it idle for 5 mins or so and then hold it wide open for 5 mins. after that test drive, then its ready to go haul 80,000lbs plus.
 

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This is one of those debates that has two layers to it. There are the surface opinions, and then there is the below the surface desire to have what we have done in the past validated.

Nobody wants an expert to come in here and tell them they broke their engine in wrong. They don't want to worry in the future knowing that. Human tendency is to fix blame elsewhere and not on ourselves.

What if someone bought a house and then later found out it was built over a fault line? Rather than moving out, taking the loss and moving on, most people will instead stay there and try to rationalize it, that it would be too expensive to move now, "what are the chances", etc. All the best rationalization in the world won't help when the house is caving in, though.

So take what you read here with a grain of salt. Everyone is going to find a way to defend what they did in the past.
 

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Owners Manual and Sticker Limits for Reference

I've attached the Owner's Manual break in page from my 2010 version. The sticker limits are 3500 to 100 mi, 5000 to 300 mi, 6000 to 600 mi, 7000 to 800 mi, and 8000 to 1000 mi. As you can see, even the Triumph folks don't completely agree.

I also happen to have a Mechanical Engineering degree and agree with the previous post that unless you are the designer of the particular motor, you don't know much.

Now I'm going to start my study as to why so many engineering geeks ride Triumphs.
 

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I've attached the Owner's Manual break in page from my 2010 version. The sticker limits are 3500 to 100 mi, 5000 to 300 mi, 6000 to 600 mi, 7000 to 800 mi, and 8000 to 1000 mi. As you can see, even the Triumph folks don't completely agree.

I also happen to have a Mechanical Engineering degree and agree with the previous post that unless you are the designer of the particular motor, you don't know much.

Now I'm going to start my study as to why so many engineering geeks ride Triumphs.
Withdrawn.
 

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I'm about to join the Triumph crowd in the next week or so and it's hysterical to see that the same break-in and oil usage discussions take place in this forum as with all the other forums for my other vehicles.

As for me, I'll be breaking in my bike as per the manual rather than the sticker.
 

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I went with a break in slightly harder than recommended, mostly a few more revs, full throttle at medium rpms under a load (so it didn't spin uch higher quickly) and mostly just avoided steady rpms for any length of time. At 4,000 mi I have a strong engine that hasn't used a drop of oil. I think the other important thing is not to put any load on it until the engine is fully warmed up.

FWIW
 

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I think the other important thing is not to put any load on it until the engine is fully warmed up.
Yup, +1 on that!

Before I'll even think about moving my bike around the drive under it's own steam, I'll let it idle and warm up fully.

Most engine damage normally, AFAIK, occurs when the engine and oil are cold. So no sence in starting your pride and joy up, then revving it's nuts off, is there? Well, not to me anyhow. That, and regular oil and filter changes to about 3000 miles (Every 500 or so miles, semi-synthetic).

:D
 
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