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Just replaced the front pads on my 1999 ST with EBC sintered pads.

Here is a tip for all of you thinking about doing this easy yet satisfying job (this is not intended for those of you with some real skills but rather for clumsy inexperienced guys like me).

Remove the clutch side caliper before the brake side. There is only one brake hose and no speedo cable so it is a lot easier to figure out how to remove/replace the caliper without scratching your wheel.

I did it in the reverse order, but was lucky I did not scratch my rim.
 

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Just replaced the front pads on my 1999 ST with EBC sintered pads.

Here is a tip for all of you thinking about doing this easy yet satisfying job (this is not intended for those of you with some real skills but rather for clumsy inexperienced guys like me).

Remove the clutch side caliper before the brake side. There is only one brake hose and no speedo cable so it is a lot easier to figure out how to remove/replace the caliper without scratching your wheel.

I did it in the reverse order, but was lucky I did not scratch my rim.
Do you even need to remove the caliper just to change the pads?
 

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yeah, its pretty tight, and it would be hard to push in the cylnders without the rotor in there. plus if you are in there anyways, a little brake fluid and a toothbrush and rag will clean off the cylinders well and help braking performance too
 

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I have the 'busa 6-pots and always change my pads with the calipers on the bike. I figured out a good way to push the pots back into the calipers to create room for the new pads...

stick a small 8-mm wrench into your caliper (where the new pad would go), flush against the pots. With your thumbs on the calipers, grab the ends of the wrench and pull inward slowly. It really makes pushing the pots in easy!
 

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After removing the old pads, I stick a pair of needle nose pliers with the business end wrapped in electrical tape into the calipers, opened with the rotor in between but not touching the ends of the pliers. I open the pliers so the backs touch opposite pistons, then open the pliers further and the pistons push back in. Sometimes takes a little grunt to push them back but it works for me.
 

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I use the old pad and a two-prong clamp and just spin the clamp down until the pistons are in the correct spot.
 

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For optimal brake performance, always remove the calipers, clean the exposed part of the pistons, and only then push them in to install the new pads. Shoving the pistons back into the bores without cleaning the pistons first is a recipe for dragging brakes and poor lever feel.

Remember, the only thing that retracts the pistons when you let off the brake is the tiny little ridges on the piston seals. When you push dirty pistons back into the bores, you're packing that dirt and brake dust into those grooves.

Pro tip: to get the pistons out far enough to clean but not too far, put one of your new pads in between the pistons (like where the pads will go when you install them) and squeeze the brake. The pistons will extend beyond the Ring of Crud that you want to remove, but not too far so as to pop them out and ad to your hassle and mess.
 

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Just replaced the front pads on my 1999 ST with EBC sintered pads.

Here is a tip for all of you thinking about doing this easy yet satisfying job (this is not intended for those of you with some real skills but rather for clumsy inexperienced guys like me).

Remove the clutch side caliper before the brake side.
Not to be a pedantic tit here but as there are two brake calipers on either side of the wheel, couldn't both sides be the "Brake side"?
You do have a clutch lever on the left side of the bike and the clutch itself which is on the right side and could be confusing for some..

But what I guess you mean is the caliper on the same side as the clutch lever, and brake lever respectively,
Or even simpler would be to say " do the Left caliper first, then the right" That would do it too!
 
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