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Somebody posted a step by step procedure a while back about changing the rear pads. I cannot for the life of me find it using the search function. Anyone remember which thread it was in?

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Thanks 88 but I found them back on page 6 for now by robbie in thread - Brake calipers - Where are all the bits. And by boocat2 in thread - Changing the brake pads. I would put the links in here but I haven't figured out how!.....:confused:

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is it that hard ?

I've only had the fronts off but it seemed a case of simply removing the retaining pin, taking the caliper off the slider and they pretty much fell out.

Need to do them before winter, especially after all this rain, and get tehm greased up again.
 

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is it that hard ?

I've only had the fronts off but it seemed a case of simply removing the retaining pin, taking the caliper off the slider and they pretty much fell out. snip...quote]

Nope, not hard at all. Here's the link to the Boocat2 thread, although it's not quite all there in any kind of order. So I'll give it a go.

1) Put the bike on a paddock stand or centre stand. If you have neither, you can still do it on the side stand.
2) Remove the RH side cover to expose the fluid reservoir.
3) Loosen the cap, but don't remove the cap completely. If you do, when you push the pistons back in, the fluid will squirt out and make a lovely mess for you to clean up!
4) Loosen the two allen headed pins on the caliper, don't remove them yet. If you can't see them, they're under the slotted caps on the outside of the caliper.
5) Remove the two bolts holding the caliper to the bracket.
6) There is no need to undo the hydraulic brake line, unless you are changing piston seals, just take care when you twist the caliper around to work on it.
7) Remove the allen keys and extract the pads, taking care to note their fitment and how the new pads will go back in.
8) With Brake cleaner, clean the whole caliper, paying special attention to the exposed surfaces of the pistons. These need to be smooth and clean. You may need to lightly emery the allen headed pins to allow smooth sliding.
9) Carefully push the pistons back into the caliper, you may need to use a lever or a vice grip, but usually if they're clean they'll go straight back in just using your thumbs. Don't rush this, if you do the fluid will squirt from the open reservior.
10) Some recommend a copper slip on just the pin thread, others on the pin sliders as well. I find a mix of chain lube and grease works and doesn't attract enought dirt to worry about. DON'T GET THE GREASE ON THE PADS :eek:
11) Fit the new pads, using very light smear of copper grease on the BACK of the pads, then screw the allen headed pins into place.
12) Bolt the caliper back on to the mounting bracket and tighten up the bolts.
13) Check the brake fluid in the reservoir, it should be OK, but top it up if it's still low.
14) Refit the reservior cap and clean any excess fluid from anywhere around the area.
15) Replace the side cover
16) Apply the brakes a couple of times to settle them and make sure they are working. The pedal may need to be pumped a few times at the first application.
17) Test ride the bike - making sure you bed the brake pads in gently at first, gradually building up the stopping pressure over a few stops.
18) Return from the test ride and re-check all the bolts, side cover, fluid reservior etc.

Done.... Should have taken you no more than about 1/2 hour.

Mick :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It's not hard at all. Miker you have it covered exactly how I did it. It's actually easier than it looks.

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4) Loosen the two allen headed pins on the caliper, don't remove them yet. If you can't see them, they're under the slotted caps on the outside of the caliper.

10) Some recommend a copper slip on just the pin thread, others on the pin sliders as well. I find a mix of chain lube and grease works and doesn't attract enought dirt to worry about.
A small correction here in case someone get confused. There's only one pin per caliper.

I'm in the "grease the threads only" camp. I believe that you don't want anything that might attract dirt and stop the pads sliding along the pins.
 

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Just checked with Bikebandit, and the 06 does run with 2 pins, couldnt be bothered to check what year they changed from one pin tho;)
 

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Brake pads Sprint ST

Somebody posted a step by step procedure a while back about changing the rear pads. I cannot for the life of me find it using the search function. Anyone remember which thread it was in?

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Changing the front pads went smoothly, didn't get any further than reading "remove back wheel"eek: for the caliper removal and pad change. Will leave it to the workshop when I put the bike in for a 60,000 service.
Why the hell should it be that difficult?
Gordon
 

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Changing the front pads went smoothly, didn't get any further than reading "remove back wheel"eek: for the caliper removal and pad change. Will leave it to the workshop when I put the bike in for a 60,000 service.
Why the hell should it be that difficult?
Gordon

I saw this and thought, what Tiger have you got, then saw the Sprint ST bit, never had a sprint so cant help, maybe youd get better help in the Sport Touring section
 
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