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Discussion Starter #1
I'm "stuck" in New Orleans. My rear brake wore down to the bare metal (I just changed them 2 months ago... Colorado did this to me!). I tried changing the pads, but the hex socket guide pin rounded out. I freed it with an easy-out bit and changed the pads. Does anyone know of a suitable alternative to the guide pin? It costs about $12 for an OEM set, so I assume they're generic. The Triumph shop here doesn't open until Tuesday, and they'll probably have to order it. Right now, I got the old one to sit in place lightly, and I'm not going to ride on it until I hear from the community here. Chances are I may need to move onto the next town to find a replacement.
 

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On second thought, just realized the pin is long and is smooth along middle for pads to slide.

Might be tough at Ace. Perhaps dealers (others besides Triumph) might have in stock except would imagine most are closed on Mondays.


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Is there any downside to using the SS pins? (see my thread "rear wheel noise"... I just ordered a new set of OEM pins)
Sometimes stainless hardware into aluminium causes what they call "Galling". It can lead to seizure through a sort of cold weld. It's usually avoided by applying a layer of some lubricant to the threads.

For example, the stainless bolts that hold the Bonnies handlebar clamps are screwed into alloy risers. The Factory instructs us to "apply clean engine oil" to threads before torquing down.

Mind you the engine casings bolts are all stainless into alloy and they say nothing about it...

With brake components I always use a dab of anti-seize compound to avoid that sort of thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Forchetto, on that link, it mentions Nissin rear calipers. What brand of motorcycle uses Nissin? I could probably walk over to those dealerships that might supply them. I've got the measurements, and today I'll make my way around looking for alternatives.
 

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Copper anti-seize grease is what I use.

Those pins are used on quite a few Japanese bikes. Some are very similar, but a different length though. I don't know any more details but lots of bikes use those calipers.
 

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would copper grease anti seize be good? I have in the tool box from changing spark plugs.
Off topic, but NGK, the spark plug maker, and Triumph tell us not to use anti-sieze on spark plugs. The danger is over torquing the plug and stripping the threads out of the head.

Of course, that's why we have helicoils.
 

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NGK states that some sort of anti-seize is included in the plating of the plug. Probably just a softer metal that will strip off and not allow galling to occur. They don't recommend using anti seize on their plugs as stated above.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
New pins in place, and I'm ready to leave NOLA! This is a great place to hang out for a week. Beer-to-go at every bar. CA needs a law like this.
The guide pins were $13 out the door at the dealership here.
 

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"Galling" only occurs with like metals. And, it doesn't really make any difference if it's soft (like aluminum) or hard (like titanium or heat treated cobalt.)
Stainless into aluminum, it isn't going to happen. Electrolysis maybe, but not galling.
Thread lubrication will minimize galling, and special lubes can reduce the path of electrons causing wear or material transfer.
 

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Hi Guys/Gals.... 2012 Triumph T100 owner here, does anyone knows if the original brake caliper PIN are the same size for the front and rear, coz have removed my rear brake for cleaning and best thing have found a shop which carries Stainless Steel Pins which I want to change all 4 pins(front and rear). I have got a sample of the rear pin with me now and instead of also stripping apart the front brake, tot i might want to pop over to the shop directly today to purchase all 4, IF its the same size.

Thanks in Advance.
 

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Pretty sure the front one is a bit shorter than the rears. There's only three, two in the rear and one in the front.

Sounds like a dirty joke, somehow.

I have some in the garage, I'll try and remember to confirm they are different in the morn. There are after-market titanium versions I think, I've been meaning to research which ones fit our bikes. Those hex heads strip out too easy, would like a tougher metal.
 

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Pretty sure the front one is a bit shorter than the rears. There's only three, two in the rear and one in the front.

Sounds like a dirty joke, somehow.

I have some in the garage, I'll try and remember to confirm they are different in the morn. There are after-market titanium versions I think, I've been meaning to research which ones fit our bikes. Those hex heads strip out too easy, would like a tougher metal.
Thanks BonnieBlack....was not aware or bother to check the front, first thoughts, they are all the same, HUH, only 1 pin ! guess will delay my purchase today and open up the front too, just to be sure to get the correct one and lubricate it with anti seize as have seen in this forum, many got the pin stuck.
 
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