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Do you track the bike or push it hard for longer periods in the twisties?

For track use, Motul RBF 600 (DOT 4) is hard to beat. Lots of cycle and sportscar shops carry it in stock.

For normal street use, Valvoline SynPower (DOT 3/4) works well, but does not have quite as high of a boiling point - wet or dry. But it it can be found at most automotive parts shops and Walmart.

A vacuum brake bleeder (even a cheap one) will definately help with removing fluid and air.

LINK -
Brake fluid comparison

I hope this helps.

[ This message was edited by: Devious2XS on 2007-01-11 09:43 ]
 

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Just glad to help Doc.

One of the things you may want to know about the Valvoline SynPower-vs-Motul 600 is that the 600 SEEMS to absorb water sooner than the SynPower - at least here in HUMID Alabama. So I tend to flush the brakes more often when using 600.

The Casterol SRF works VERY well, costs twice as much as Motul 600, and is very hygroscopic. It does not save well in the can, and I have only found it in 1L bottles/cans.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks for the RE:'s

honestly didn't check the fluid cap but i'm planning on flushing front/rear

have a true double braided line setup going on the front :)
 

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Martin - A lot of it depends on the use of the brakes, the atmospheric conditions, and the fluid used. Many of the high performance fluids actually last longer than the fluids used in OEM applications, but the more heat they are subjected to reduces their life.

In many cases, vehicles with a couple of years time on their brake fluid (even with very moderate usage), NEED to have their brake systems flushed, and will notice a large increase in firmness when this is done. They will still work without it, but not at their optimum. Flushing regularly also prevents damage in the system caused by water - synthetic brake fluids also help in this reguard by keeping the water in suspension.

For street driving applications, where the brakes are not being pushed to their limits, high performance fluids are neither warrented, nor wanted.
 

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On 2007-01-12 05:46, martinyoung wrote:
Why, when most manufacturers recommend every 2 years and so many vehicles go far longer between changes?
And many of said vehicles end up with expensive master cylinder & caliper rebuilds and/or replacement.
 

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Mine haven't.

I do not see the need to change brake fluid yearly, without fail.

There may be a need to change brake fluid due to contamination, or loss of braking performance if the machine has been used on the track or due to other overly hard use, but not yearly, without fail.
 
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