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Ok, the front brake on my Tiger is where it belongs, on the right handlebar. The front brake on my bicycle is on the left handlebar.

Do you biker/cyclists live with it, or move your bicycle front brake to the right side?

Nobody will ride my bicycle but me.
 

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If you don't like it then move the bicycle brake over. I've done it on some bicycles. Or, move to Japan or maybe the UK where it's reversed. I bought a leftover Jamis on eBay that was in the original box, needing setup. The front brake was on the right side, destined for Japan. I moved it back to the left side since I'm just used to the convention for bicycles in the US and maybe Europe as well. No big deal. It's a convention that maybe associates itself with which side of the road you ride on and hand signals, perhaps.
 

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I live with it. It hasn't been a problem for me.

I know a few people with vintage Triumphs with the shifter on the right. They also have modern bikes. THAT is something I don't know how I would deal with.

-Ed
 

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I tend to grab both brake levers(on the bicycle) simultaneously so I guess I dont notice which is which,

I have an older Triumph but its been so long since I've been for a ride on it that I'm not sure how I'd handle the shifting, when I bought it back in 72 or 73 I had plenty of Japanese bikes, before, during and after, so I must have dealt with it OK though.
 

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I rode bicycle a lot for years before getting into motorcycles and funny thing is I can go back and forth with zero confusion on which lever does which. Not sure why as most of my life is spent in confusion :)
 

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I never even thought about this before I read this thread. I guess it has not been an issue but now I will have pay attention.
 

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On the motorbike you want to use mostly front brake. On the bicycle mostly rear. So having them both on the right bar makes sense to me, so you are always reflexively going for the correct brake in a panic.
It's a little more complicated like that, at least for bicycles. I trained, raced, and rode competitively for many years on bicycles. On a bicycle, both brakes are essentially the same design (if they are rim brakes), and have the same intrinsic ability to slow the pertinent wheel. On a bicycle, like a motorcycle, the weight shifts to the front as you slow. It's much easier to skid the rear wheel than on a motorcycle, which typically has a much weaker brake on the back. Like a motorcycle, skidding the front wheel is much more exciting than skidding the back. Since your own bodyweight is a far higher percentage of the total weight on a bicycle compared to a motorcycle, skidding the front is harder on a bicycle than on a MC. You're more likely to overturn the bike (highside) than you are to skid the front wheel. On the other hand, corrections you make instinctively via your bodyweight as you try to maintain balance are a lot more effective on a bicycle than a motorcycle.

Since you are training endlessly as a bicyclist, and you're always running into situations on the road, you eventually figure out the best way to brake and it becomes body memory. In a pack, when I had to dump a little speed in a hurry for some reason, I'd always use my front brake only (left hand). If I was alone and had to stop quickly, I'd use both brakes modulating appropriately.

I never had an issue confusing bicycle and MC reflexes. I think the different sensory experience of the bike and MC was enough to trigger the correct body memory responses.

-Ed
 

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As a casual bicycle rider, I use both brakes equally and simultaneously. I can't remember which is which.

I suppose I'd be paying more attention if I were riding a bicycle more aggressively, but my bicycling consists of ambling along rail trails at a relaxed pace.
 

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Pappy,

Years ago my son was in middle school. The family rode dirt bikes many weekends. Riding his bicycle something jumped out in front of him and he grapped too much brake and broke his arm going over the front. When I got home. I was looking at the bike and realized that it was opposite. Always wondered if it was a factor.

Dan
 

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It's a little more complicated like that, at least for bicycles. I trained, raced, and rode competitively for many years on bicycles. On a bicycle, both brakes are essentially the same design (if they are rim brakes), and have the same intrinsic ability to slow the pertinent wheel. On a bicycle, like a motorcycle, the weight shifts to the front as you slow. It's much easier to skid the rear wheel than on a motorcycle, which typically has a much weaker brake on the back. Like a motorcycle, skidding the front wheel is much more exciting than skidding the back. Since your own bodyweight is a far higher percentage of the total weight on a bicycle compared to a motorcycle, skidding the front is harder on a bicycle than on a MC. You're more likely to overturn the bike (highside) than you are to skid the front wheel. On the other hand, corrections you make instinctively via your bodyweight as you try to maintain balance are a lot more effective on a bicycle than a motorcycle.

Since you are training endlessly as a bicyclist, and you're always running into situations on the road, you eventually figure out the best way to brake and it becomes body memory. In a pack, when I had to dump a little speed in a hurry for some reason, I'd always use my front brake only (left hand). If I was alone and had to stop quickly, I'd use both brakes modulating appropriately.

I never had an issue confusing bicycle and MC reflexes. I think the different sensory experience of the bike and MC was enough to trigger the correct body memory responses.

-Ed
I've ridden (and raced) bicycles for years and it's never been a problem switching between the bicycle and the motorcycle. I'm not sure why, maybe it is the different sensory experience like @ebolton said or maybe it's muscle memory or some combination.

My girlfriend swapped her bicycle brakes, but that's because her left hand is weaker from surgery and isn't capable of squeezing the front brake hard enough (she doesn't ride a motorcycle).

Personally, I'd say do it if it makes you more comfortable.
 

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i switch my mtb brakes. i have for 30 years. my 43 y.o. son who rides moto and bikes equally, still leaves the bicycle alone. i'm old, he isn't.:smile2:
 

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I used to race mountain bikes and I still do a lot of cycling and agree with what others said - you just know. Zero conscious thought involved going back and forth, all muscle memory.

Don't know if this will resonate with anyone, but in the early Seventies when I was 11 or 12 years old the coolest form of freedom for an urban kid was the Peugeot 10 speed. We got on these after riding Schwinn Sting Rays or whatever tanks we delivered papers with, and suddenly...FLEW! You only grabbed a big hand full of front brake at speed once, and then you learned.
 

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In the UK, the rear brake lever on a bicycle should be on the left so that a rider can indicate for turning right and still operate the more controllable rear brake.

Some motorcycle riders have no problems switching between left hand shift and right hand shift. I have three of five, missing left hand "down for up" and hand change, generally no problems swapping bikes, but not 100%
 

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Don't know if this will resonate with anyone, but in the early Seventies when I was 11 or 12 years old the coolest form of freedom for an urban kid was the Peugeot 10 speed. We got on these after riding Schwinn Sting Rays or whatever tanks we delivered papers with, and suddenly...FLEW! You only grabbed a big hand full of front brake at speed once, and then you learned.
I was probably around that age or year or two older when my parents presented me with my first road bike. I don't remember the brand. I do think it was a nice one. They probably bought it from a GI moving back to the States (we lived on an Army post in Germany). We had the hardest time figuring out presta valves and how to air up the tires. BUT, it was great!

In high school, my bikes were cobbled together from anything I could find.

Those were the days. Get up and in the morning, head in a direction, and come back in time for dinner. It was a blast! No one knew where I was and sometimes I didn't know either.

And, yes, I still remember the first time I did a stoppie. I'm still quite proud that I didn't crash!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for the great responses. I'm just back from a river cruise from Budapest to Amsterdam wherein I took two bicycle excursions; one had 'normal' derailleur and rim, left-side front brake, other was an Amsterdam 'city bike' type with 3 speed rear hub and disc right-handle front brake [!]. Both worked fine.

I think for mine, riding around town rather than competitive/off road, I will leave it as is, left=front, and use both together.

cheers
bp
 
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