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There was some controversy surrounding the 1050 cc models of the 2005 model year. These models were fitted with new radial brake calipers by the Japanese company Nissin. Although the brakes initially performed well, many developed problems with time. In some cases after only a few days, the brake lever would develop increased travel and develop a soft feel (described as "mushiness"). The characteristic was often compared to the feel of brakes with air trapped within its hydraulic system. The initial response from Triumph was that this was "normal", and designed to be this way. Triumph called this characteristic "progressive feel" brakes.

Many riders refused to accept Triumph's explanation, and after continued complaints several remedies ("fixes") were developed. The original, official Triumph fix, was to replace the piston seals inside the brake calipers. Very quickly this was found to be temporary at best, and enterprising riders and mechanics developed other temporary fixes for the problem. Bleeding the brakes was one such temporary fix, as was a technique of compressing the caliper pistons and then pumping them back full of fluid. However, all the temporary fixes were just that, temporary.

In 2006 with the release of the Daytona 675 — equipped with the same brakes — Triumph released a second official fix for the problem, still without admitting that there was a problem. This fix was the installation of specially coated brake caliper pistons. It turns out that the brake pistons from the Daytona 675 are also slightly different in shape. The early 1050 Speed Triple pistons were dished on the top, yet the Daytona pistons were flat. The new shape and coating is now standard on all 1050 Speed Triples. Reports are that this has at least partially solved the issue. An additional change to the brake master cylinder from the Daytona has also improved brake performance according to some reports.

In spite of any complaints, the 1050 Speed Triple has shown itself to be one of the best braking motorcycles in existence. Motorcycle Consumer News reported the shortest braking distance of any bike they had ever tested.[2] Ironically, the motorcycle with the previous shortest stopping distance was also a Speed Triple: a 1999 T595 model.

By the summer of 2007 this situation has largely become a non-issue, however much of the media and Triumph community continue to discuss the problem. The release of the new 675 Street Triple only complicates the issue, because it has returned to a traditional and very different style of caliper.

As of 2008, the Speed Triple comes equipped with high-spec, twin Brembo radial front caliper four pad, four piston units.
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mike
 

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My 06 S3 has a really poor rear brake response. The bike only had 2700 miles when I purchased it a couple of weeks ago. I can damn near stand on the rear brake pedal and the rear tyre will not skid. i want to remedy this problem but would like to know what others have done. My vin is prior to #253302 which I beleive the S3 rear brake was updated. Has anyone tried a Rizoma or GSG rear brake reservoir?
 

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Rear brake is weak by design. It is so that you can safely use it to settle suspension on corner entry without the risk of locking the rear wheel. Same thing is with every Ducati. This is after all considered sport bike...
Cited above description of S3 brake problem is about front calipers.
 

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My 06 S3 has a really poor rear brake response..... Has anyone tried a Rizoma or GSG rear brake reservoir?
A reservoir will do nothing to change any braking performance - it is cosmetic only, functionally identical.

This is the same braking configuration that has been on these bikes since 1997 - was never very effective.

One performance enhancemant that is easy to do is that you can install a 1/2" master cyclinder in place of the OEM 14mm Triumph unit. It will increase the braking force at the caliper for the same applied force; it will give you an effective brake without dangerously being too much.

I see the part number for the rear master on the 2005+ 1050's is different from the earlier models, but I believe this is just the reservoir.

A 91-96 Kawasaki ZX7 /750 master cylinder is a form & fit replacement - except has 1/2" bore versus 14mm.
If you buy from EBay, be sure to buy a seal/piston kit for that 15 year old component!
Or buy new - Kawasaki part # 43015-1456 - but $188 online at http://www.mrcycles.com (which was lowest of three I checked)
 

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I guess my rear brake was like the rest and rubbish. Definite improvement though, after replacing the pads with EBC HH.
 

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Looks like a troll/spam post to me. No question or discussion just copied+pasted text. An excuse to post a hyperlink for search engine ranking purposes.
 

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Looks like a troll/spam post to me. No question or discussion just copied+pasted text. An excuse to post a hyperlink for search engine ranking purposes.
I agree. Somehow, I get the feeling that's the only post Spameer is going to make.
 
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