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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an '06 bonnie t-100 --- two questions:

1: The tires are marked tubeless, but the owners manual states that only tube tires be used with spoke wheels. So, does the bike have tube or tubeless tires? I want to get a road kit in case of a flat and need to get the right kind (patches vs plugs).

2: The read springs are set from the factory - nice comfortable ride. But if I take another adult as a passenger I think i'd need to adjust the springs (the manual tells you how much)....but what "tool" do i use to adjust them?

Much appreciated!
 

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OK - so the first point on tyres. All spoked wheels need tubes - period. Although the tyre may state "tubeless" on the wall. I use a type of sealant called Slime - http://www.slimesealant.com/ . This gives me the assurance that if I get a puncture, at least I can get home without call-outs etc.

Second - the suspension thing. At the bottom of the spring there is a hole and ratchet affair. You don't need a "special" tool at all. Just use a metal bar that fits the hole and turn it to whichever setting you need. I tries various settings and came back to the standard as this is the most comfortable.
I always ride within speed limits and don't do the knee scraping, life challenging, corner leans that some riders talk about so the need for stiff suspension isn't a priority for me.
I prefer to see the scenery and take in the beauty of the ride rather than playing the Russian Roulette game of "will I hit an oil patch or dead critter?".

Hope that helps




[ This message was edited by: johnsime on 2006-11-13 01:22 ]
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks - so you're saying that the tires, though marked "tubeless", actually have tubes in them? So, I'd need a patch kit, rather than a plug kit, right?

On the suspension, my question was less around changing the general ride (I'm a scenery lover myself), but rather adjusting it to take on an adult passenger.
 

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Most tires are tubeless. Some, maybe all, say "fit a tube on spoked rims" or something like that. Spokes won't hold air.
 

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Hi J,
Regarding which tool to use for adjusting the springs? I use anything that fits into the hole in the stepped adjusting collar. If the spring collar is free to rotate (I oil the collar to prevent seizing) then the 5mm allen wrench under the side cover will rotate the collar. The first time or two a larger leverage may be required so look around the tool box, a phillips head screwdriver? Wrap a cloth around the collar to aid in gripping/rotating it. Take care to avoid pinching!

I have used all the above at one time or another.

MIke
 

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Yeah.... the "tubeless" tires used on the Bonnie actually use inner-tubes. You can find an outfit that will seal your wheels so that you can go tubeless for about $60.00 a wheel, but the court is still out on them. BMW made some spoke wheels that were designed to go tubeless, the spokes actually went to the outermost edge of the wheels..... pretty nifty actually.

There are different products out there to carry in the event of a slow leak. Slime is NOT a preventitive measure and should be used only when all you wanna do is get back home. There is a warning on the bottle not to exceed 60 mph or something with Slime in the tubes. There is another product out there that combines a sealant with compressed air so it can inflate your tire too. From what I've read, it's rare that these magical products work.... but if they do when you need it... whoHOO!

You should be running with your rear shocks on their lowest setting if you're of average weight. It might be a good idea to have the fluid changed out in your front forks to something of a heavier weight though. Then you might be able to better match the preload of your rear shocks to a front end not as soft (little damping) as they come from the factory.

With a passenger, crank them puppies (rear shocks) up to max preload (unless you're both little feather-weights). I use a tool that holds multiple sizes of allens. One of the allens will fit perfectly, and the tool becomes a handle with which to crank the preload up a few notches.

Now go out there and RIDE!
:-D
 

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It is a tubeless tire. It can be mounted tubeless on bikes with aluminum mag wheels. It can ALSO be used on bikes with spokes. But it has to have a tube put in it. Spokes won't hold air. But it is still a tubeless tire.
Probably the main reason is the tire companys wants to sell it to everyone so it is dual purpose. But it is a tubeless tire.
 

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I had a lot to say but forgot it all. I use slime in my rear tire & I haven't had a flat yet. It has been in there almost a month.
But I was with a friend once & we got to Arkansas when his rear tire went flat. We found a nail in it. We removed the nail, pryed the tire off in that area, pulled the tube out, patched it & poked it back in & aired it up. Didn't take the wheel off. Went on to Tennessee & Mississippi.
 

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Best tool made for adjusting suspension is a set of Ikon adjustable shocks and Ikon progressive fork springs. Great help on the tire info guys, thanks!
 
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