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New to posting but not new to the site.

Ok I have been searching high and low on this website but I cannot definitively find the exact answer I am looking for. I have a 2013 Thruxton with stock suspension. I am looking to lower the ride height so I can get a cooler look while also allowing for my feet to sit more flat on the ground. I have 5'6" with 29"-30" inseam. With the boots I have I am just about flat right now but would like that little extra so that I have some knee bend and can flat foot on declines/inclines without issue.

I want to go with Progressive suspension for the parts and plan on using the bonneville rear springs and the bonneville front lowering springs that they make but there are a few options for the rear springs and I cannot decide what size would be best for what I need it for(lowering) while still having a high enough ride height so that I don't bottom out. Here's my question. If I choose to go with the stock bonneville rear spring size(13") vs. the stock Thruxton(14.25") and the front bonneville lowering springs, how much lower will the bike be? The lowering springs from Progressive indicate that they come with 1" and 2" settings.

Likewise, the rear bonneville springs are sold as -1/2"(12.5") and -1"(12").

Which rear spring size(12", 12.5", 13") and front spring setting(1" or 2" lower) do you recommend so that I can achieve the best
geometric setup while also lowering the bike to a comfortable level?

Thanks in advance and appreciate the input!
 

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This is a ticklish subject. By lowering the rear, you are slowing the steering. Then by dropping the front you are shortening the wheelbase, which makes the bike tighter in steering.

I would go to T100 length shocks (340mm I think) then drop the front by 15mm by moving the forks up in the tripple trees. You may need higher risers to make room for your preload adjusters.

This way you are preserving suspension travel. Shorter springs mean less travel and a stiffer ride.

Cheers,

RD
 
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