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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Afternoon

Following on from a number of threads and a failed attempt to move my ignition I decided to start a keyless ignition project - I figured a few people could be interested in my results, especially as it can be done for under £50.

So back to the start, I originally tried to relocate my ignition with one of the motone brackets, however it didn’t arrive as such whilst going through the claim with motone (who were very helpful) I decided against just moving the bracket to the right hand side for 2 reasons:

Water ingress
The wire is stretched and in plain site.

So this left me in a difficult position, I want to relocate the bracket, but no one makes anything that would work. I could have just extended the wires but it seemed somewhat un-inspiring.

After reading allot of threads on ignition systems I was going to install a M lock, but it’s well over £120. There are others who sell these kind of kits like Digital Guard Dawg, but I’m cheap and don’t want to fork out serious £ when I just don’t like where the key is.

Thus I began the quest for something better and came across what I can only describe as a home made M Lock using an RFID transponder on a popular sport bike forum. I contacted Ripper who assisted on the wiring diagram and some of the tech stuff. I found a way of integrating it all into one very neat, small box and have nailed it for anyone to use.

My objective was as follows - to move my ignition for under £50 and make it easier/cooler to start.

It all starts with an RFID tag reader - available from ebay for about £15 shipped - included is a master key and 2 key tags - if anyone needs links I will PM them. I do not sell these, but did order 2 and only used 1.

The RFID reader is about 5.5 x 10cm and pretty compact, but there is quite a lot of inside space. My thought process is if there is space why not use it.

I begun by dismantling the box, removing all plastic tags/inserts and move the holes so all the wires could come out without being bent.

I then sourced the smallest 30a relays I could (£6.64 for 5). After some testing these fit nicely inside the top box of the RFID reader so got stuck down with some double sided tape.



Next comes the wiring - whilst I could explain the process of this it’s easier to put up the diagram so please see this - below. I'm sure some will have questions over this as it's tailored for me. For example thicker wires in the diagram represent heavy gauge wire.



Its worth noting that the RFID reader would not fit into the headlight - I wanted as much in one unit as possible and to be able to wave my 'key' past the RHS side panel to allow me to start. To do this I had to bring the box into the battery area - where I could then run the RFID receiver to the side panel. I also needed to hook up to the earth and the alarm connector. Whilst I’m sure I could have done this by splicing wires in the headlight I did not want to splice something that would impact the bike if I had to go back to a normal switch later on. Logically this was a better place for the box.



To achieve this I had to to run wires from the box to the headlamp - I used 4 lengths of 120cm 15a cable - or speaker wire which cost me £10 for 20m.

I then proceed with the electrics following the wiring digram - all lengths were cut/tested/then fitted and soldered to connectors and slid onto the relays. I spent about £10 on spade connectors and diodes. The diagram denotes where higher gauge wire was needed and where diodes/fuses should go, not to mention all the correct relay pin No's

Once all wired up it was time to squeeze the unit down - to reduce the wires I also cut down the signal LED which I didn’t want on display and fitted it into the box. I found I had to wiggle a few of the wires to make everything - including the 1a fuse fit.



I then did a test fit, and sealed the unit with tape - upon completion I sealed the unit with clear silicone. It all went in at a push - I also insulated the connectors between the relays and the main PCB





When all together I removed the stock connector on the ignition and replaced it with a deutsch connector - importantly I re-wired the original ignition first, then tested, then did the new ignition - that way if it did not work I could continue. The reason for removing the original connector was Triumph use 2 types, one is a fairly common type, the other is the deutsch - however my bike being 2010 used the old one it was bigger and harder to come by.



Once that was done, I modified the alarm connector dummy plug to connect the wire that latches the relays - this means if the kill switch is ON the ignition will turn on and stay on. If the kill switch is OFF the ignition will turn on but only whilst the tag is in close proximity, and the relays will not latch on. A simple battery terminal was added to the black earth wire, though any convenient earth point can be used. Do not earth to the frame though.

Once tested and happy, gas tank off, all the wires tidied up and secured along the bike, the RFID box fits nicely next to the battery and under the seat.

I then mounted the antena behind the R/H side panel using magnets - this means it’s secure but can be easily removed if I need to remove the side panel.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7uC1uiFNInA

Seat back on etc and were pretty much cooking with gas at this point. Now to make it slick. At this point people will say you still need a key to start it, but what if we remove the need to hold it? I decided to order some RFID chips from Germany, these are the size of a grain of rice. I have sewn one into my glove - I’m considering having another injected into my hand (but thats another story). Now all I need to start her is my riding gloves. When I’m ready to ride all I need to do is flick the ignition switch, swipe my hand and I’m off.

Here is the money shot - please note I didn’t start the bike due to only having 1 hand free and I could not pull in the clutch lever.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4l-Pm2leSzI

There you go folks - keyless ignition done for less than £50 and no brackets in sight.

I went on to modify my front end - removing the stock ears and moving to low profile LED indicators

 

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A very good and concise write up,lots of good pics and info, keyless is on my things to do, after the DGR ride and therefore beginning of winter along with regulator relocation, are those mini 30a relays, the best I've found is 25a in mini form, I'm planning on going with the thought the ignition is not going back on and want to split the loom and pull cabling back
 

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Here is a diagram which will cover all models. It assumes that the main wiring to the ignition connector is carried out in the headlamp shell. If the wiring is peeled back and connected at/near the fuse block, the feedback wire can be connected to pin#1 of the alarm connector. Click here for a larger diagram.

 

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Discussion Starter #5
A very good and concise write up,lots of good pics and info, keyless is on my things to do, after the DGR ride and therefore beginning of winter along with regulator relocation, are those mini 30a relays, the best I've found is 25a in mini form, I'm planning on going with the thought the ignition is not going back on and want to split the loom and pull cabling back
Thank you, I have a habit of starting projects during prime riding season, but this one is is good because you can do all the work then actually fit it in an evening - assuming you don't want to pull the loom apart.

Those are micro 30A relays too.

Happy to assist any and all who want to do a similar project.
 

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Very interesting write up. Can I ask where you were able to source the ignition switch plugs from?. Thanks rob
 

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One more probably stupid question (in my defense, my engineering experience is more in the "break stuff with extreme prejudice" than make things, and I'm not an EE); what kind of diodes do I need?
 

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Couple questions:
1. What is the LED for? Light up when the RFID is activated maybe? Does it blink like an alarm system?

2. Could I use the red alarm LED on my speedo face instead? It sits there and does nothing so maybe this would be kinda neat.

C. How long does the RFID stay energized once you swipe the fob past the antennae?

Thanks for the help. Been meaning to do this and maybe now I'm closer to it.
 

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Couple questions:
1. What is the LED for? Light up when the RFID is activated maybe? Does it blink like an alarm system?
The LED lights whenever the tag is present. It is a visual confirmation that the unit has sensed the tag and that the RFID output is energised. The light goes out when you take the tag away and the RFID output goes dead. It does not blink.

2. Could I use the red alarm LED on my speedo face instead? It sits there and does nothing so maybe this would be kinda neat.
Providing that the LED on your speedo face is a 12 volt LED, yes you can. Just cut the LED off the RFID unit and connect its wires to pins 10 and 11 of the alarm connector. The annode (+) of the LED is on pin 11.

C. How long does the RFID stay energized once you swipe the fob past the antennae?
It doesn't. The RFID output is only energised while the tag is there. The relays latch on immediately and when you take the tag away the RFID unit plays no further part and the relay latch takes over until the bike is switched off. Presenting the tag simply supplies a 'pulse' to trigger the relays.
 

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Just got RFID unit (that was quick!), waiting for other components. Just out of curiosity, what are the internal male jacks for?
Do you mean those Spade connectors that stand up off the board? I don't know about those since I haven't bothered to trace the tracks on the board to see where they go, but I suspec that they are extensions of the existing connectors, possibly for daisy chaining power to other units or something similar. They are unused and can be cut off to gain a little more internal space but do it carefully, some of the chips on the board are sensitive to damage by static from your body. I usually wear a grounded wrist strap when working on boards.
 

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Ok, it's put together, and I'm pretty sure it's right. It isn't as compact or neat as Mr*Beaver's but as a first time project I'm happy. I'd like to test it before I install it, and if I read the schematic correctly that means putting 12v across pin 4 (+) and pin 1 (ground), but I'm unsure what else. Does pin 2 (feedback) need power too?

If I have something wrong, is the worst I'm going to do be blow all my fuses, or fry the ECU? Thanks.

 

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Ok, it's put together, and I'm pretty sure it's right. It isn't as compact or neat as Mr*Beaver's but as a first time project I'm happy. I'd like to test it before I install it, and if I read the schematic correctly that means putting 12v across pin 4 (+) and pin 1 (ground), but I'm unsure what else. Does pin 2 (feedback) need power too?
Pin 4 is constantly live, it comes (more or less) straight from the battery/main fuse. It is that pin of the ignition switch connector that powers the whole thing, so to test the unit, you would wire pin 30 of RL1 to pin 4 of ignition connector, and the ground to pin 1 of the ignition connector.

Pin 2 (feedback) comes from the bike's ignition circuit, and when the relays throw over and that circuit comes live, pin 2 feeds power back to the relays to keep them latched on. It is not necessary to connect pin 2 for testing, but the relays will not stay latched without it. If you connect only the power wires as above for testing, the relays should throw over when the tag is presented, and drop out again when you take the tag away. That should be sufficient to confirm that the unit works.

If I have something wrong, is the worst I'm going to do be blow all my fuses, or fry the ECU? Thanks.
Blowing a fuse is about the worst that can happen if you got something wrong. However, it would be wise to give your wiring a final check before you do the testing. Mr. Beaver blew the first RFID unit when he forgot to wire in the feedback diode, but nothing can happen to the bike.

*EDIT*
Mr*Beaver wishes me to correct the last paragraph of this post, the RFID unit did not blow as a result of forgetting the diode, the output voltage was being dragged down to below 5 volts which was not enough to operate the relays. That was the result of missing out the diode. The RFID unit blew when he decided to take matters into his own hands and see if shorting the main power wire to the RFID output would kickstart the relays. Having 12 volts shoved up its ass was too much for it to take. This point may be important to anyone experiencing the same problem.
 
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