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Discussion Starter #1
I just completed a rebuild, and being smarter than the average bear I went to a bit of trouble in labeling the wiring -what connected to what etc. (because wiring does confusing me). However I used a felt tip pen and laid it out on the concrete. We had a bit of a wet winter, the moisture came up through the concrete and labeling became blue dots. I got it installed and am trying to work it out and require some help. Can someone tell me where the the three red wires - negative ? (joined by a large eyelet) mount to -I'm think to the horn bracket but I think that that would be a bad earth? and where would the other one earth wire mount to? once I have that I will probably need some assistance with the rats nest under the seat..
Thanks for any assistance.
Cheers,
Paul.
738125
738126
IMG_0994.JPG IMG_0996.JPG
 

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Hi Paul,

Firstly, welcome to the Forum. :)

red wires - negative ?
Always, always, always POSITIVE.

... to the engine - under the head-steady nut in the image?

... originally to the mudguard bolt in that image.

However, that Red wires' ring terminal attached to the mudguard is useless for its intention - afaict, it was supposed to be the return to battery +ve for the rear indicators. Much better is:-

. cut off the ring terminal, terminate each wire with a bullet, push each bullet into a 4-way (two wires in each end) snap connector;

. run a (Red?) wire from the snap connector to each rear indicator, terminate those wires with ring terminals to fit under the indicator stems mounting on the grabrail.

It's also wise to add similar wires from the front indicators into the headlamp shell, connected into the Red wires there; assuming you've done the same as Meriden - mounted them on the painted headlamp brackets :rolleyes: - but you've painted or powder-coated the brackets as well as the rest of your bike, paint/powder-coat doesn't conduct electricity ... ;)

probably need some assistance with the rats nest under the seat
just completed a rebuild,
From your images, I'm guessing you have the Triumph workshop manual and wiring diagrams? Nevertheless, more images of specifically that area of your bike would be helpful.

However, I see a Boyer-Bransden electronic ignition in one of your images; risking telling you things you know already:-

. The "Transistor Box" White wire should be connected to the loom White/Yellow wire from the handlebar kill switch.

. The Transistor Box Black wire should be connected to just one ignition coil "-" terminal (assuming two individual ignition coils, that coil's "+" terminal should be connected to the other coil's "-" terminal, only the second coil's "+" terminal should be connected either directly to the battery +ve terminal or at least into the loom's existing Red wires network; ime, it should not be connected to the frame or other bike part).

. Ime, the Transistor Box Red wire should be connected directly to the battery +ve terminal, not to the second ignition coil's "+" terminal and/or the frame or another bike part.

. Consider making the aforementioned connection between Box White and loom White/Yellow a widely-available blade fuse holder with a 5A or 7.5A fuse; otherwise the EI's only electrical protection is the main fuse, which is either the original "35A" 'blow' cylindrical glass-'n'-metal fuse or a 15A/20A blade fuse. (n)

Hth.

Regards,
 

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I see you’ve got the notorious pre-insulated crimped bullet connectors on the black/white and black/yellow wires. I’ve had trouble with them coming loose.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi Paul,

Firstly, welcome to the Forum. :)


Always, always, always POSITIVE.


... to the engine - under the head-steady nut in the image?


... originally to the mudguard bolt in that image.

However, that Red wires' ring terminal attached to the mudguard is useless for its intention - afaict, it was supposed to be the return to battery +ve for the rear indicators. Much better is:-

. cut off the ring terminal, terminate each wire with a bullet, push each bullet into a 4-way (two wires in each end) snap connector;

. run a (Red?) wire from the snap connector to each rear indicator, terminate those wires with ring terminals to fit under the indicator stems mounting on the grabrail.

It's also wise to add similar wires from the front indicators into the headlamp shell, connected into the Red wires there; assuming you've done the same as Meriden - mounted them on the painted headlamp brackets :rolleyes: - but you've painted or powder-coated the brackets as well as the rest of your bike, paint/powder-coat doesn't conduct electricity ... ;)


From your images, I'm guessing you have the Triumph workshop manual and wiring diagrams? Nevertheless, more images of specifically that area of your bike would be helpful.

However, I see a Boyer-Bransden electronic ignition in one of your images; risking telling you things you know already:-

. The "Transistor Box" White wire should be connected to the loom White/Yellow wire from the handlebar kill switch.

. The Transistor Box Black wire should be connected to just one ignition coil "-" terminal (assuming two individual ignition coils, that coil's "+" terminal should be connected to the other coil's "-" terminal, only the second coil's "+" terminal should be connected either directly to the battery +ve terminal or at least into the loom's existing Red wires network; ime, it should not be connected to the frame or other bike part).

. Ime, the Transistor Box Red wire should be connected directly to the battery +ve terminal, not to the second ignition coil's "+" terminal and/or the frame or another bike part.

. Consider making the aforementioned connection between Box White and loom White/Yellow a widely-available blade fuse holder with a 5A or 7.5A fuse; otherwise the EI's only electrical protection is the main fuse, which is either the original "35A" 'blow' cylindrical glass-'n'-metal fuse or a 15A/20A blade fuse. (n)

Hth.

Regards,
Thanks for your help, Stuart. I am trying to follow the wiring diagram (Haynes owners manual) 1963 on 'Wiring diagram 1 : All models from DU 66246 (export)' but with the black box and a solid-state rectifier I'm finding it a bit hard to connect the dots. When they talk about right and left-hand coils is that taken from the rear or the front of the bike?
Thanks, Mate.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I see you’ve got the notorious pre-insulated crimped bullet connectors on the black/white and black/yellow wires. I’ve had trouble with them coming loose.
Yeah Mate, I don't like them either. I inherited them on the bike. I normally cut the red sleeve off (can be tricky) I then slide on shrink wrap, crimp the naked connecter on warm it up, never had a problem. Once I get the bike going and have some time (normally the middle of summer - too hot to ride) I will go back and make all modifications that have been suggested.
Cheers,
Monaro.
 

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Hi Paul,

trying to follow the wiring diagram (Haynes owners manual) 1963 on 'Wiring diagram 1 : All models from DU 66246 (export)'
:) No wonder you're struggling ... "DU 66246" was the start of '68 650's, which were 'dry frame' (separate oil tank); you've got an OIF 750 - dating from somewhere between '73 and '75 judging from your avatar image? The electrics aren't vastly different in principle but, faced with just the bike and no(?) experience, they look wa-aa-ay different? If nothing else, that wiring diagram doesn't show "the loom White/Yellow wire from the handlebar kill switch" in my last post ...

Also, Haynes motorcycle workshop manuals are excellent ... as door stops and under the short leg of a wobbly bench or table :) ... not for nothing are they known as "Heinous", "Haynes Christian Andersen", etc.

While you can buy most original Triumph workshop manuals brand-new on paper, they're also available free-to-read online - click on the link and then on any "750s" between 1973 and 1978 (same manual); when it's downloaded, assuming your bike is '73-'75, the wiring diagram you want is on manual page H21, .pdf page 190.

Aside, also if you haven't come across them, while the parts book and Owner's Handbook for your bike are also available brand-new on paper, again, the parts book is also available free-to-read online. (y)

black box
When they talk about right and left-hand coils is that taken from the rear or the front of the bike?
Doesn't matter with electronic ignition:-

The Transistor Box Black wire should be connected to just one ignition coil "-" terminal (assuming two individual ignition coils, that coil's "+" terminal should be connected to the other coil's "-" terminal, only the second coil's "+" terminal should be connected either directly to the battery +ve terminal or at least into the loom's existing Red wires network; ime, it should not be connected to the frame or other bike part).
... means the ignition coils are connected 'in series', here it means the "black box" switches both coils on and off at the same time, so both plugs spark irrespective of whether the given cylinder is on the compression stroke or the exhaust stroke. (y)

Btw, if your bike still has original '12V' coils, you might experience starting and/or running problems, the latter more likely at higher rpm; '6V' coils are better in this particular application.

solid-state rectifier
Do you actually mean just a "rectifier":-



... or do you mean a regulator/rectifier - say, looks like this:-



... that replaced both the original rectifier and the Zener diode?

Post which and I'll advise the wiring.

notorious pre-insulated crimped bullet connectors on the black/white and black/yellow wires.
don't like them either.
normally cut the red sleeve off (can be tricky) I then slide on shrink wrap, crimp the naked connecter on warm it up,
Fwiw, connections between EI "black box" and trigger unit, I use standard Japanese bullets and sockets:-




... with both insulators, the terminals connections are pretty-much waterproof (oilproof inside the timing cover :sneaky:).

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter #7
G'day Stuart, I do use the Japanese terminals when I have space. It's a rectifier. I think that it goes like this: Red to the positive bottom terminal (might explain the +), top terminal to alt. Bottom terminal to the alt.
IMG_0999.JPG
top terminal to negative (brown/blue wire) from loom via zener diode
738295
to negative on the battery? I did run (from the black box) White to White/Yellow, Black to + side of the coil then from + on coil to
738290
+ on battery. There is a double red wire from loom to + on battery? However (much like engine rebuilds) I have some spare parts (wires).



A double White / Yellow and
IMG_1007.JPG
from the black box (black/white to black/white in loom) an addition connection
738294
Hope this doesn't prevent you from getting to work on time, thanks for your help mate. Cheers, Paul.
 

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Hi Paul,
use the Japanese terminals when I have space.
The most-commonly available 3.9 mm. dia. (aka 4 mm.) are no bigger than the red-insulated squash-on bodger's terminals; if you can get the 3.6 mm. dia. used on old Hondas, they're shorter as well as smaller-diameter.

rectifier.
Red to the positive bottom terminal (might explain the +),
Absolutely does "explain the +" ... ;) Also, the terminal isn't parallel to the other three.

Then, to be absolutely clear:-

. Brown/Blue - from battery -ve and to the Zener and ignition switch goes on the terminal diametrically opposite the +ve terminal with the Red wires, furtherest from the +ve terminal.

. The wires from the alternator stator go on the terminals 'between' +ve and -ve. Your image of the rectifier won't enlarge but it appears to have a "~" beside the other terminal; if it does, the "~" indicates an AC terminal. Doesn't matter which stator wire to which "~" terminal.

If you hold your rectifier beside its depiction in the wiring diagram, with the "+" terminal orientated in the same position as the diagram's "earth" symbol, the other wires connect exactly as on the wiring diagram. (y)

(brown/blue wire) from loom via zener diode to negative on the battery?
As shown in the wiring diagram, the Brown/Blue connection to rectifier -ve is closest to battery -ve, the Brown/Blue to the Zener is further away from the battery. In reality, it's hard to mix them up - Brown/Blue on the rectifier -ve is a 1/4"-wide spade, Brown/Blue on the Zener -ve is a 3/8""-wide spade.

Black to + side of the coil then from + on coil to + on battery.
I'm guessing (hoping) you meant "Black to - (negative) side of the coil?

From your images, the bike has two standard 40-mm. dia. coils, in the standard mounting behind the battery. "(from the black box) ... Black to - (negative)" terminal of just one of the coils?

There is a double red wire from loom to + on battery?
You mean the lower two Red wires to a single ring terminal in this image?



... If so, they're the ends of the loom 'earth' wires, should be connected to battery +ve.

This brings an opportunity to suggest another mod. to the bike's fusing:-

. Problem with a single fuse in the Brown/Blue attached to battery -ve is, because the bike's electrics are 'positive earth', all the non-electric metal parts of the bike are still electrically +ve, because loom Red wires are connected to the frame and engine at various places.

. Problem with that is, if a piece of metal (loose tool, battery-charger croc. clip, etc.) touches the battery -ve terminal itself and any other metal part of the bike, it makes a short-circuit that isn't through that one-and-only standard fuse. :(

. Similarly, modern batteries that are allegedly the 'equivalent' of the original Lucas PUZ5A actually can be taller due to different terminals. Triumph wasn't generous with space between any of the electrics under the seat and the pan, taller battery coupled with bendy seat pan can be something else metal that touches the battery -ve terminal. :(

. A short-circuit not though through the one-and-only standard fuse messes up those Red wires attached to battery +ve in a few seconds. 😭 For that reason, I advise modifying the ends of those two Red wires:-

.. Cut off the ring terminal and terminate each wire end with a bullet (I use the same 3/16" OD bullets used elsewhere in the loom), connect the two bullets into a snap connector.

.. Make up a short length of wire (I use Red and thicker 28-strand wire) to reach between the snap connector and the battery +ve terminal; most importantly, fit a fuse holder in this wire (I use a blade fuse holder) with a 15A fuse.

.. Thereafter, if a piece of metal touches the battery -ve terminal itself and any other metal part of the bike, this fuse will blow, preventing any further damage to the electrics. (y)

You can leave the fuse/holder in the Brown/Blue wire but I replace it - the new fuse in the Red wires offers the same protection against short-circuits from other sources and, with two fuses, there's a risk both will blow and you'll need two new fuses to get the bike going again. :(

have some spare parts (wires).
A double White / Yellow
IMG_1007.JPG
When the coils were switched by points, each coil "-" terminal was connected to the kill switch; of the two wires in that "double White / Yellow":-

. the other end of one wire re-emerges from the loom as the 'single' White/Yellow you've connected to the "black box" White wire;

. the other end of the other wire re-emerges from the loom inside the headlamp shell, to connect to the White/Yellow from the handlebar button.

If you use the spade terminals and soft translucent plastic insulators that correspond to the ones on the loom already, instead of the red-insulated squash-on bodger's terminals, I recommend covering the "spare ... double White / Yellow" just with the corresponding male spade insulator (you might need to tape the two insulators together to be sure the male one is secure). Reason I suggest this is B-B and clone EI have a 'feature' that's a right royal pita when trouble-shooting; the insulated "spare ... double White / Yellow" will be a useful place to plug in a temporary jumper wire if necessary when trouble-shooting. (y)

Aiui, in Oz, the spade terminals and soft translucent plastic insulators that correspond to the ones on the loom already can be found from Narva? If you use the Japanese bullets, you have the crimping tool already?

from the black box (black/white to black/white in loom) an addition connection
... and a similar additional Black/Yellow connection?

When coils are switched by points, the points have a connected condenser, to reduce the sparking between the two faces as the points open and close. On the OIF, the two condensers were mounted beside the coils so, of the two Black/White and Black/Yellow wires from the loom, one would've connected to a coil "+" terminal and the other to the corresponding condenser.

With nearly all EI for Britbikes, the loom Black/White and Black/Yellow wires are repurposed to connect the "black box" to the trigger unit on the engine. As your bike has the "black box" mounted near the coils, one Black/White and one Black/Yellow loom wire are connected to the corresponding wires out of the "black box"; the condensers aren't required so the terminals of the unused Black/White and Black/Yellow should be taped up securely.

This image makes me think the bike's original airbox has been removed, because the Zener diode is normally mounted on the standard airbox? Reason Triumph did that is the Zener gets hot turning excess alternator output into heat. Zeners have to be mounted on a heatsink of at least 25 sq.in.; used for any length of time mounted as in your image, to paraphrase an old Oz joke punchline, "It's gonna die." :(

Also, the Zener appears to be mounted on the bracket originally use to mount the rectifier. If you mount the Zener on a proper heatsink somewhere else on the bike, the rectifier also can be mounted properly, instead of being left to roll around loose near the coils. (n)

If you can't mount the Zener on a proper heatsink, maybe consider replacing both with a modern regulator/rectifier? Post if you want suggestions?

Hope this doesn't prevent you from getting to work on time,
:) No worries.

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi Paul,

The most-commonly available 3.9 mm. dia. (aka 4 mm.) are no bigger than the red-insulated squash-on bodger's terminals; if you can get the 3.6 mm. dia. used on old Hondas, they're shorter as well as smaller-diameter.


Absolutely does "explain the +" ... ;) Also, the terminal isn't parallel to the other three.

Then, to be absolutely clear:-

. Brown/Blue - from battery -ve and to the Zener and ignition switch goes on the terminal diametrically opposite the +ve terminal with the Red wires, furtherest from the +ve terminal.

. The wires from the alternator stator go on the terminals 'between' +ve and -ve. Your image of the rectifier won't enlarge but it appears to have a "~" beside the other terminal; if it does, the "~" indicates an AC terminal. Doesn't matter which stator wire to which "~" terminal.

If you hold your rectifier beside its depiction in the wiring diagram, with the "+" terminal orientated in the same position as the diagram's "earth" symbol, the other wires connect exactly as on the wiring diagram. (y)


As shown in the wiring diagram, the Brown/Blue connection to rectifier -ve is closest to battery -ve, the Brown/Blue to the Zener is further away from the battery. In reality, it's hard to mix them up - Brown/Blue on the rectifier -ve is a 1/4"-wide spade, Brown/Blue on the Zener -ve is a 3/8""-wide spade.


I'm guessing (hoping) you meant "Black to - (negative) side of the coil?

From your images, the bike has two standard 40-mm. dia. coils, in the standard mounting behind the battery. "(from the black box) ... Black to - (negative)" terminal of just one of the coils?


You mean the lower two Red wires to a single ring terminal in this image?



... If so, they're the ends of the loom 'earth' wires, should be connected to battery +ve.

This brings an opportunity to suggest another mod. to the bike's fusing:-

. Problem with a single fuse in the Brown/Blue attached to battery -ve is, because the bike's electrics are 'positive earth', all the non-electric metal parts of the bike are still electrically +ve, because loom Red wires are connected to the frame and engine at various places.

. Problem with that is, if a piece of metal (loose tool, battery-charger croc. clip, etc.) touches the battery -ve terminal itself and any other metal part of the bike, it makes a short-circuit that isn't through that one-and-only standard fuse. :(

. Similarly, modern batteries that are allegedly the 'equivalent' of the original Lucas PUZ5A actually can be taller due to different terminals. Triumph wasn't generous with space between any of the electrics under the seat and the pan, taller battery coupled with bendy seat pan can be something else metal that touches the battery -ve terminal. :(

. A short-circuit not though through the one-and-only standard fuse messes up those Red wires attached to battery +ve in a few seconds. 😭 For that reason, I advise modifying the ends of those two Red wires:-

.. Cut off the ring terminal and terminate each wire end with a bullet (I use the same 3/16" OD bullets used elsewhere in the loom), connect the two bullets into a snap connector.

.. Make up a short length of wire (I use Red and thicker 28-strand wire) to reach between the snap connector and the battery +ve terminal; most importantly, fit a fuse holder in this wire (I use a blade fuse holder) with a 15A fuse.

.. Thereafter, if a piece of metal touches the battery -ve terminal itself and any other metal part of the bike, this fuse will blow, preventing any further damage to the electrics. (y)

You can leave the fuse/holder in the Brown/Blue wire but I replace it - the new fuse in the Red wires offers the same protection against short-circuits from other sources and, with two fuses, there's a risk both will blow and you'll need two new fuses to get the bike going again. :(


When the coils were switched by points, each coil "-" terminal was connected to the kill switch; of the two wires in that "double White / Yellow":-

. the other end of one wire re-emerges from the loom as the 'single' White/Yellow you've connected to the "black box" White wire;

. the other end of the other wire re-emerges from the loom inside the headlamp shell, to connect to the White/Yellow from the handlebar button.

If you use the spade terminals and soft translucent plastic insulators that correspond to the ones on the loom already, instead of the red-insulated squash-on bodger's terminals, I recommend covering the "spare ... double White / Yellow" just with the corresponding male spade insulator (you might need to tape the two insulators together to be sure the male one is secure). Reason I suggest this is B-B and clone EI have a 'feature' that's a right royal pita when trouble-shooting; the insulated "spare ... double White / Yellow" will be a useful place to plug in a temporary jumper wire if necessary when trouble-shooting. (y)

Aiui, in Oz, the spade terminals and soft translucent plastic insulators that correspond to the ones on the loom already can be found from Narva? If you use the Japanese bullets, you have the crimping tool already?


... and a similar additional Black/Yellow connection?

When coils are switched by points, the points have a connected condenser, to reduce the sparking between the two faces as the points open and close. On the OIF, the two condensers were mounted beside the coils so, of the two Black/White and Black/Yellow wires from the loom, one would've connected to a coil "+" terminal and the other to the corresponding condenser.

With nearly all EI for Britbikes, the loom Black/White and Black/Yellow wires are repurposed to connect the "black box" to the trigger unit on the engine. As your bike has the "black box" mounted near the coils, one Black/White and one Black/Yellow loom wire are connected to the corresponding wires out of the "black box"; the condensers aren't required so the terminals of the unused Black/White and Black/Yellow should be taped up securely.


This image makes me think the bike's original airbox has been removed, because the Zener diode is normally mounted on the standard airbox? Reason Triumph did that is the Zener gets hot turning excess alternator output into heat. Zeners have to be mounted on a heatsink of at least 25 sq.in.; used for any length of time mounted as in your image, to paraphrase an old Oz joke punchline, "It's gonna die." :(

Also, the Zener appears to be mounted on the bracket originally use to mount the rectifier. If you mount the Zener on a proper heatsink somewhere else on the bike, the rectifier also can be mounted properly, instead of being left to roll around loose near the coils. (n)

If you can't mount the Zener on a proper heatsink, maybe consider replacing both with a modern regulator/rectifier? Post if you want suggestions?


:) No worries.

Hth.

Regards,
Stuart, you a wealth of information through somewhat overwhelming (I woke up read your reply and decided I needed another lie down) As it happens I already have a Lucas single-phase rectifier/regulator (I have another project-64 Matchless G12) I was going to use it on that, but now I think the Trumpy is my priority So if I can bend your ear for the best way to hook it up, that would be great. Once its works I'm going to follow your advice on the improvements to the wiring. A bit scary about shorting out the wiring. I'm reminded of the quote of the great Tim Allen of Home Improvement when his wife brought a Morgan? home, "positive earth, what were the English thinking". By the way they may be making another couple of shows in the future - must-see TV.
Cheers, Paul.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Stuart, what do you mean by a 'snap connection' - snap lock? and 've'
Cheers.
 

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Hi Paul,
a wealth of information through somewhat overwhelming (I woke up read your reply and decided I needed another lie down)
:LOL: I try to make the bits of information as 'bite-size' as possible, so you can decide whether each bit is worth following or not; nevertheless, any queries or more information required, please just ask.

Lucas single-phase rectifier/regulator
best way to hook it up,
It has two Yellow wires, one Black wire and one Red wire? If so:-

. Each Yellow wire to a different stator wire. If the Yellow wires will reach to the ends of the wires out of the stator itself, connect them there, rather than the ends of the wires connected to the rectifier.

. Black wire directly to battery -ve terminal, Red wire directly to battery +ve terminal. Fwiw, I include a blade fuse holder and 15A fuse (assuming original 120-Watt alternator?) in one of these wires - reg./rec. fail only very rarely ... but, absent a fuse, a short-circuit's a short-circuit ... :whistle:

. Tape up the Brown/Blue wire spade terminals that connected to the rectifier and the Zener.

"positive earth, what were the English thinking"
;) Doesn't make any difference to DC electrics, they work exactly the same. "Negative earth" just means the vehicle's structure is connected to the battery -ve terminal - piece of metal between a metal part of the vehicle and the battery positive terminal still buggers something:-

. If it's, say, a '79-on Triumph (-ve earth) without an electric start, Black wires from battery -ve (to the frame and engine) are the equivalent of those two Red wires to battery +ve on your bike; one or more of those Black wire(s) will be buggered. :(

. Vehicle with electric-start has a thick cable or earth braid from the structure to the battery -ve terminal; if that isn't screwed by the high current through the short, something else not fused will be. :(

what do you mean by a 'snap connection'
The black-insulated steel tube(s) that connect two or more bullet terminals together; your bike probably has only:-




I already have a Lucas single-phase rectifier/regulator (I have another project-64 Matchless G12)
You're planning to upgrade its electrics to 12V? If so, some years ago, one of your fellow-countrymen put me on to these:-

. 5Pin Regulator Rectifier 31600-MY7305 31600-MV4010 for HONDA CB CBR 600 900 1100 | eBay plus 5 Pin Regulator Rectifier Male Plug Connector For Honda CBR 250 250 300 600 1000 | eBay

. Btw, the above reg./rec. had a "Sale ends in:" timer; :rolleyes: if the link doesn't work when you look, 5Pin Motorcycle Part Regulator Rectifier 31600-MY7305 31600-MV4010 for HONDA CBR | eBay

. The plug has three Yellow (AC) wires because the reg./rec. are 3-phase; however, they can be connected to a single-phase stator just by removing one of the Yellow wires from the plug.

. In this case the Green wire is connected to battery -ve, or it can be replaced with your preferred colour/combo.

. The 3-phase option can be useful - were you to replace either the Triumph's or Matchless's stator at some time, the prices of modern Lucas-replacement stators are similar irrespective of power output, which makes the '78-on high-output 3-phase stator the best value for money; to connect a replacement 3-phase stator, simply reinsert the third Yellow wire in the plug. (y)

Hope the above is digestible without another lie-down. ;)

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Stuart, didn't have time to do anything yesterday, but what do I do with that 4 red wire bundle that supplied power to the Zener diod?
Cheers,
Paul.
 

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Hi Paul,
what do I do with that 4 red wire bundle that supplied power to the Zener diod?
Uh-uh, counter-intuitive though it might sound, DC is always from "negative" and to "positive". :) Reason I've put "negative" and "positive" in quotes is they're just a naming convention, from a time before anyone knew about electrons or their movement. When electrons and their movement was discovered, couldn't really change the convention ... :whistle:

So, on your bike, the circuit through the Zener is from battery -ve along the Brown/Blue wire, through the Zener and back to battery +ve along one of the Red wires (the other Red wires are returns from other electrical components, the Red wire to battery +ve is common to all of them as well as the Zener).

Tape up the Brown/Blue wire spade terminals that connected to the rectifier and the Zener
Ditch the grey metal bracket along with the Zener, bolt the Red wires' ring terminals to the frame bracket with a shorter bolt. :)

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Stuart, I have had to order the proper connectors through eBay (All the auto shops are only carrying the 'squash' connecters - even Jaycar) so stuck until they arrive. I must be starting to pick it up I thought that the red wires would have to be connected to the frame. Need to run a couple of things past you again:
a) On the black box you suggested going straight to the batter (red wire) '+" on battery. The original set up had the red wire going from black box to '+' on the coil, then from '+' coil (via twin spade connector) to '+' on battery.
b) I'm completely lost me on what to do with the twin white/ yellow wires - tape them up?
c) Remove glass fuse holder from Brown / Blue wire, as I'm putting the splade fuse on the positive wires from the harness.
d) Big one this. On the instructions for positive earth installation, it shows the earth to frame? or is that a battery symbol?
e) What do I do with the double red wire from the harness? The same ones that holds the double white/yellow wires.
Thanks Mate.
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