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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings, I want to soften up the ride on my 68 Bonneville. I guess I'm just getting old. It has emgo replacements on it now. I usually ride on secondary roads at 60mph or less. Thanks for all replies.
 

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A nice set of Hagon shocks might suit at around £200 in the UK. Mine have been on for 20 years so far and still work well with no corrosion or leaks.
 

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Contact Hagon direct and they will tailor a pair of shocks to suit you. I have Emgo on one bike and find them very hard, on the other I have Hagon with the stock settings. I much prefer the way the Hagon shocks feel.

Rod
 

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Hi Rod, Thanks for the report.

What springs does your Hagon have? Are they normal wound like factory, or progressive wound?

Do you know the pound rating of your springs?

If you don't mind what is your weight.

I've been looking a shocks also as my originals are harsh.

Hagon website has many options so I want to get it right. The stock settings is what on Hagon?
Thanks again, Don
 

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Of the shelf I believe the Hagon are supplied with a medium weight 40lb spring. From memory they were progressive wound but I re fitted the original Girling shrouds and have not seen them in 8 years!

I'm a shade under 170lb (according to Google conversion). I can screw on a 60 litre pack and the ball and chain, set the adjuster to the middle notch and not bottom out.

I contacted Hagon before I left the UK and had a long discussion with a chap. As mentioned they will tailor the shocks to your weight and riding style for the same basic price. I then emigrate to NZ and brought an off the shelf pair.

I've put a little over 20000 miles on them and they are still performing as new. By comparison, the Emgo have 350 miles on them and the bushes have already perished and split. They work perfectly well but just do not have the same feel as the Hagon, hopefully that makes sense.

Rod
 

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Of course, when ordering shock absorbers for an oil in frame, or any other bike for that matter, you will need to know the unfitted length. Those cheap Emgo ones are suitable for average riding and i have them on the Spitfire. Very hard ride but they work for short rides. The Hagon are gas type. I would not buy the budget Emgo for a bike i was going to keep.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I would not buy the budget Emgo for a bike i was going to keep.
I never know if I'm gonna keep a bike, until it's built, and I've had a chance to ride it while. Has anyone had experience with Ikon shocks on a mid 60's Bonneville? I have a set on a 71 bmw, that I really like.
 

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Ikon...Koni backwards...it was a messy divorce. But their shocks are OK.


Personally...your topic asks for best shocks for a '68...I am biased, Fournales all the way if you want the best. I have them on all my bikes, they ain't cheap but you get what you pay for IMO.
If you ever have a bike that feels hinged in the middle and doesn't live up to the handling hype, try a set of Fournales, the difference is night and day!


But if you are after a good useable shock then Hagon [no experience, just what others say] or Ikon [have them on my farm quad bike, great for hill climbs and spraying weeds lol] might be more suitable?
 

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If you ride in a sporty manner, the rear shocks need to compliment the front fork action ...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If you ride in a sporty manner, the rear shocks need to compliment the front fork action ...
My riding is anything but, sporty. I like 45mph. Most of the roads I ride are oiled and graveled. K70 tires work best. I just want to soften up the ride a bit.
 

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IKON tri-rate shocks.
I have them on all of my vintage bikes. You can pick the spring rate as well and great people to deal with.
 

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Shocks that you might like to satisfy your priorities are a risky buy via long distance. About 10 years ago my back was pained with freeway freeze bumps left over from winter so I bought some bottom of the line Progressive shocks with springs according to my weight from the nice man at Progressive who assured me that my Sportster would ride very well. As it turned out the Progressive shocks rode slightly rougher than the stock shocks but I left them on the bike hoping that they would soften with age which did not happen. My back did, however, get better and tolerant again. The Progressive shocks were/are not marked but I believe that they were 412s.

A couple of years ago I bought my 2007 Triumph Bonneville with shocks and springs set up for a larger person so I put my Sportster shocks back on the Sportster (rode smoother after the change) and put the Progressive 412s on the Bonneville. Both have lengths of 12-1/2" c-c. The Sportster shock springs have about 15 turns of .277" wire while the Progressive shock springs have about 13 turns of .282" wire. The Sportster will go over certain freeway joints without standing on the pegs but with the Bonneville I must stand on the pegs over some of these same bumps to preserve my back. I have a long term ongoing search for a softer ride with the Bonneville. One day I will get the ride as I want it.

As with the OP, a smooth ride is my main priority. Hagon's site is good and honest to caution people that they are reluctant to sell shocks from their U.S. web site for their reasons stated.
 
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