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2014 scrambler. Side stand took some weight when it was transported in the back of a truck on its side stand.Now the bike leans at a 45 degree when on its side stand. I had already noticed the side stand bending over time as the bike would lean at a more intense angel. The bracket/side stand looks fine/straight. It looks like the problem is the frame/where the side stand is welded.

Took it to dealer hoping it would still be covered under warranty-- of course side stand isn't covered. Service said they have seen that problem before. Said that these bikes aren't made to take any weight what so ever while on its side stand. (granted I could see how this would happen being transported on the stand, but I don't see how it could happen simply with a loaded bike on a road trip-- which is where i first noticed the lean beginning). Dealer said what needs to be replaced is the whole left side of the frame where the side stand is welded.

http://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts/detail/triumph/t2075241/b1797031?m=155989&sch=806772

http://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts/2014-triumph-scrambler/o/m155989#sch806772

Part 10. Manufacturer part #T2075241
$182.52

Anyone else run into this problem? I don't see/couldn't imagine the frame being jeopardized-- But still have the thought in the back of my head that the bike might not be safe to ride like that? If I do get that part^^^ how hard would it be to replace? I do see part of it does hold the front of the engine. I don't want to pay $200 for labor. Is a center stand worth looking into? Any info would be great. Thanks
 

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A stressful situation

2014 scrambler. Side stand took some weight when it was transported in the back of a truck on its side stand.Now the bike leans at a 45 degree when on its side stand. The bracket/side stand looks fine/straight. It looks like the problem is the frame/where the side stand is welded.

Took it to dealer hoping it would still be covered under warranty-- of course side stand isn't covered. Service said they have seen that problem before. Said that these bikes aren't made to take any weight what so ever while on its side stand. (granted I could see how this would happen being transported on the stand, but I don't see how it could happen simply with a loaded bike on a road trip-- which is where i first noticed the lean beginning). Dealer said what needs to be replaced is the whole left side of the frame where the side stand is welded.
I don't see/couldn't imagine the frame being jeopardized-- But still have the thought in the back of my head that the bike might not be safe to ride like that? If I do get that part^^^ how hard would it be to replace? I do see part of it does hold the front of the engine. I don't want to pay $200 for labor. Is a center stand worth looking into? Any info would be great. Thanks
Mr.Subace,

That's the first time for ME, hearing about that issue on any bike. I also could see that when being transported on the side stand, that a lot of stress would be applied to the frame. However these frames are stout, and it should have take the stress. You have not broken new ground transporting a bike in this fashion.

I would start a claim at the dealer and continue up the ladder as needed. The frame of the vehicle should be covered under warranty. They would have a hard time proving that transporting the bike was the cause. The squeaky wheel gets the grease.

It could lead to a safety issue, as it might break off sometime when parking, and damage your bike or trap you.

A center stand is always a plus, IMHO.

Although I've never replaced or had that part off, it's probably a 3, on a 1 to 10 scale of difficulty. I'm sure others will chime in.
How about some close up pictures of the frame area?

Namaste,
Charles
 

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2014 scrambler. Side stand took some weight when it was transported in the back of a truck on its side stand.Now the bike leans at a 45 degree when on its side stand. I had already noticed the side stand bending over time as the bike would lean at a more intense angel. The bracket/side stand looks fine/straight. It looks like the problem is the frame/where the side stand is welded.
It is never a good idea to transport a bike, while it is sitting on the sidestand, or centerstand.
 

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The kickstand mounting area is nearly all a solid casting welded to the end of the down tube. I got several pairs of down tubes from Pinwall for my oil cooler delete projects for 50 bucks a set. It's an easy job to replace a full tube since there's no brake hardware on that side blocking the foot peg mounting bolts. My guess is that you simply bent the pivot bolt for the stand itself. A little bend or wear at the pivot is going to exaggerate the amount of lean observed a foot away at the end of the stand. An easy replacement either way.
 

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It is never a good idea to transport a bike, while it is sitting on the sidestand, or centerstand.
Out of interest what would be the best way, planning on putting a few bikes in the back of a van soon to take them on a road trip.

| Posted Via LGG3 | Swindon UK | XBOX GT: Hollingsabre |
 

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Out of interest what would be the best way, planning on putting a few bikes in the back of a van soon to take them on a road trip.

| Posted Via LGG3 | Swindon UK | XBOX GT: Hollingsabre |
upright and strapped down at the handlebars using canyon dancer straps (or similar racheting straps). Let the suspension absorb the bumps, not the sidestand/frame.


http://www.canyondancer.com/
 

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Go to a welding shop and have them heat and bend the side stand. Not the frame. Or have them weld something on the end of the side stand. Take it off off the bike and take it in. Did this happen right after you installed longer shocks?


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Out of interest what would be the best way, planning on putting a few bikes in the back of a van soon to take them on a road trip.

| Posted Via LGG3 | Swindon UK | XBOX GT: Hollingsabre |
Any of the stands that hold one wheel upright will work I have used them for years in the back of various vans . They can be bolted down but I only ever had them freestanding , mine are adjustable to take front or rear wheel widths . I think most of the large mail order outfits have them as low as about £30 each . On one occasion I even rescued a broken down bike a short distance without strapping it in , I was just passing and stopped to help , drove carefully .
 

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..........I had already noticed the side stand bending over time as the bike would lean at a more intense angel. The bracket/side stand looks fine/straight. It looks like the problem is the frame/where the side stand is welded......
That doesn't look right from your photos, could we have some pics from the pivot bolt to frame tab area please?

Also, is there a lot of up/down free play in the side stand when extended? I had a lot in mine and always thought it was leaning to far over. I have recently taken this free play out using a shim and the bike is now a lot more upright. A little free play there equals a fair bit of lean angle.

I find it hard to believe one of these side stands could bend easily as they are a heavy piece of kit..........
 

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Best way to DOG it down?

It is never a good idea to transport a bike, while it is sitting on the sidestand, or centerstand.
I would like to politely disagree, at least as far as the sidestand.

Ideally it is best to load and tie down a bike with the front and rear suspension compressed, and the bike upright. This way the tires, shocks, and fork springs are helping to keep things in order. However, usually the method of a "tie down" is dictated by the space, and available areas to attach ties in the transporting vehicle.

If indeed space dictates that one bike has to be tied while on the sidestand, just make final adjustments to the ties, so that the sidestand is only taking "some" weight. The suspension can still be loaded to compensate for bumps. This 3 leg approach has been used by me many times without issue.

Charles
 

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I would like to politely disagree, at least as far as the sidestand.

Ideally it is best to load and tie down a bike with the front and rear suspension compressed, and the bike upright. This way the tires, shocks, and fork springs are helping to keep things in order. However, usually the method of a "tie down" is dictated by the space, and available areas to attach ties in the transporting vehicle.

If indeed space dictates that one bike has to be tied while on the sidestand, just make final adjustments to the ties, so that the sidestand is only taking "some" weight. The suspension can still be loaded to compensate for bumps. This 3 leg approach has been used by me many times without issue.

Charles

Unless you are carrying multiple bikes on a single trailer or truck, I can not see where available space dictates the bike resting on the sidestand. I would never transport my bike that way. If nothing else I would get a wheel chock as mentioned earlier and bolt it to whatever surface is available.
 

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I would never transport my bike that way. If nothing else I would get a wheel chock as mentioned earlier and bolt it to whatever surface is available.
Gabriel, please understand that I AM in agreement with you. I only want to tell Mr. subace, that sidestand support can be done without damage.
 

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The problem (maybe) comes if there is a lot of free play up/down movement when the side stand is at work, extended. As I said before mine had some free play which I took out, now the weight of my bike goes straight through the frame then along the side stand.

If Mr Subace's side stand had excessive free play already and was strapped down hard the weight would be on that small area of the pivot bolt, frame tab and side stand tabs. This would act like a sort of hinged area with the movement in the wrong direction and would become a natural weak/break point.

This is especially true on the Scrambler as it's taller and leans over far more (than it should IMO) to start with........

Hopefully we'll hear back from the OP, Mr Subace soon....... :smile2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It was loaded on its side because the trucks (stake bed) wooden panels felt janky and it was a short drive back to the shop. I don't normally transport the bike like this but hey, won't be doing that anymore. Hopefully these pictures will give you a closer look to What's going on with the side stand.

I think I am going to try to be a squeaky wheel with the dealer. I mean, they are the ones who told me that it's not the side stand that's bent, but the actual frame part where it's welded has to be replaced. Frame is definitely under warranty, right? Right??? This dealer really sucks though. Horrible customer service. La Brea, CA.

If that fails I'm just going to go to local welder and see what they can do.

Side stand has a little bit of play, but not much. Nothing abnormal imo.
ImageUploadedByMO Free1464290103.898907.jpg ImageUploadedByMO Free1464290136.804277.jpg ImageUploadedByMO Free1464290243.306168.jpg ImageUploadedByMO Free1464290264.328080.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
For now I'm just carrying a couple blocks of wood to compensate the lean angle. Little bit of a hassle.
 

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For now I'm just carrying a couple blocks of wood to compensate the lean angle. Little bit of a hassle.
Well when loading main battle tanks for sea shipment we used to stick trestles underneath and jack them down on their suspension. The basic idea is to use the suspension to keep lashings taut but not allow further compression that would permit cargo movement. (Tanks make big holes in ships - never mind a loose cannon!)
 

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OK this first photo shows your problem.



The tab on the frame is twisted upwards badly so putting the side stand out of alignment when in use. This tab should go in a straight line following the natural line of the stand to the floor with the foot sitting squarely on a level surface.

It's as I said earlier, this is a weak point if excessive pressure is applied to the bike and what I would expect with free play present. I think your side stand is perfectly OK from your photos.

I'll get some pics of mine tomorrow to show you how it should be.......
 

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Boy Racer has picked the problem. The lug is bent upwards.
This problem brings back memories!
It happened to my 2008 Scrambler under similar circumstances as the initial post described.
Took me a long time to find that that was the real issue.
I put up with the extra lean for a while but on about the 6th day of a trip around Australia it was getting annoying as I was fully loaded (camped for the majority of the 4 week 14,000k trip) so I thought I'd try and correct the lean a little by tightening the side stand bolt - gee that went well!
Naturally the bolt gave way at the point where the thread thins and screws into the stand itself.
The only smart thing I did was doing this outside an automotive shop that had a hardened steel bolt that I could use in place of the broken one.
So I managed to fix an annoying lean into an even more ridiculous lean angle!
For 4 weeks I carried a lump of wood with a wire string attached to my tank bag so I could throw it on the ground work it under the stand and fuel up etc. it was excruciating.
I tried to get it fixed at so many places along the way but with the mining boom going on at the time no one was interested in such a small job plus everyone said I couldn't heat the side stand because it was casting or something.
The eventual fix was a 2" welded rise on the bottom of the stand and heating the side stand to a point where it could be bent so there's less travel to the ground. Works great now.
Sorry about the long winded story, brought back memories of a great trip interspersed with some truly frustrating self inflicted moments.


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OK here is how it should look:



You can see how it should all be in line.

In some ways I guess we're lucky that the frame can be dismantled at this point and replaced. Having said that IMO the frame tab is at the wrong angle for the height of the Scrambler. As the same frame rail is being used throughout the range it would appear that it was designed for a lower bike. Triumph did no doubt see a possible issue and stuck an overly hefty side stand on which is poor fitting at the pivot point. Again in IMO the side stand is too short for the bike.

Tightening the bolt to over torque speck won't work as it's a stepped bolt and is in fact 'spot on' specification and fills the gap between the 2 side stand tabs perfectly. This I assume is designed to stop the tabs from cracking due to being squashed.

@subace I think you have to replace the frame cradle part and this would be the best option, you have the correct part number T2075241. While you have the side stand off I would also increase the height by having a boot/plate welded to the bottom of the stand. This is especially true if you're increasing the height of the bike with different tyres/shocks etc. I plan to do this welding mod myself if I ever find a second hand stand to work on.

My guess would be that your bike had loads of free play from new and this was the start of your problems. The free play is less now as the edges of the bent tab are taking it up...........

I hope this helps you out.......

Good luck.......
 
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