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Looks horrible, and expensive.
A Scott Oiler will see your chain last for many 000s of miles and save you a load of cash.
 

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A spraycan of oil'll do the same even cheaper :) and doesn't even need to bee installed and it'll keep your bike cleaner looking ;)
 

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Don't understand the advantage of belt drive except it's cleaner and no need to lube.

It's not more efficient or it would be used on race bikes.

Maybe belts last longer? Maybe the sprockets last for ever? (I haven't had a belt drive bike.)
 

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While I don't recall if it's the same conversion kit another aftermarket seller of Triumph goodies stopped offering it due to too many failure problems. I read this some months ago and cannot now recall who the aftermarketer is.
 

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Ask yourself, Why do cars have timing belts instead of chains?

And the debate continues... Quiet and clean come to mind.

Maximum power delivery is chain, every time.
 

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" Why do cars have timing belts instead of chains?" thy did gm use fiber chains in engines? when all the replacements from gm dealers were real chains with bronze sprockets instead of plastic?
My 84 chevette diesel had a belt, it broke while idling, and trashed the head and cam. My Alfa's have never broke a chain.
COuld it be because belts are cheaper for the manufacturer, and a little lighter?
cliff
 

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My Buell is belt driven with an idler pulley. Zero maintenance, clean, quiet and no driveline lag when ya twist the throttle. Very nice set up.
 

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Ask yourself, Why do cars have timing belts instead of chains?

And the debate continues... Quiet and clean come to mind.

Maximum power delivery is chain, every time.

My Acura RSX Type S has a timing chain and I think I heard where Honda (auto division) has switched to timing chains on all their 4 cylinder engines. On my old Civic, they recommended changing the timing belt every 90,000 miles, but no worries with the chain.
 

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Ask yourself, Why do cars have timing belts instead of chains?

And the debate continues... Quiet and clean come to mind.

Maximum power delivery is chain, every time.
My 2009 Honda Civic has a chain, or so I was told. The older Civics used belts.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
i also got a harley which is belt drive. i ain't nevah seen no bad stuff about belts on any of the harley forums. nobody says they miss the 'good old chain drive bikes'.
they's asposta last about 50,000 miles.

 

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Biggest advantage to belt drive is zero maintenance. Nothing to lube, no stretch so no adjustments, and very little power loss in transmission to the wheel. When the recommended replacement interval is reached you don't have to replace the pulleys, just the belt.

Even shaft drive requires fluid replacement, belts are as low maintenance as it gets.
 

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Back in the late 70's I worked for Harley Davidson as a test rider for new product development. (Tough job but somebody had to do it). My first test was the new, soon to be released, belt drive Sturgis model. My job was to try and break them. Each bike in the fleet had to get 600 miles a day in two shifts, 5 days a week. I had the day shift and at 5AM I had to get up, rain or shine, hot or cold and go ride various prototypes with the belt drive systems (and other new components) for 300 miles and then get back to the test center in time to fill out the reports and update the night shift rider. I rode on highways, biways, back roads, beaches and dirt trails (try riding up on the pegs on rough dirt trails on a full dress Harley, that's fun).
We very rarely broke a belt. The worst that happened would be a rock getting caught between the belt and the pulley and it would punch a hole through the belt and weaken it and if left unnoticed it could eventually break. So they improved the belt construction design to increase puncture resistance. The rest is history. Belt drives are standard on Harleys since 1980 and and are also found on several other brands. After the initials stretch and adjustment you can forget about them.

Re: the belt system for the Triumph, I considered it for my Bonnie SE but my research indicated that beside so minor modifications to the bike for clearance purposes (no problem), it would gear the bike higher therefore losing some acceleration. I think the bike is geared just right for me so I passed on the belt drive. I think it was about $800 or so.
 

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I like the idea of belt drive. I had a belt drive bike and it was quiet, maintenance free and I never gave it any time or thought. It did squeak a bit for a quarter mile after it got wet in the rain. Fears and complaints about belt drive come from people who have never used them. People that have used them know they are excellent. My favorite anti-belt fear is the rock in the pulley syndrome.
I was ready to change out the chain for the belt conversion on the Bonneville until I discovered that my $50 Loobman yields 40,000 almost maintenance free miles on a $250 chain and sprocket replacement. O-ring chains are wonderful.
Chain noise and oil on the bike don't bother me and though I would prefer belt drive a $500 conversion is a lot to spend in a failing economy.
 

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Ask yourself, Why do cars have timing belts instead of chains?

And the debate continues... Quiet and clean come to mind.

Maximum power delivery is chain, every time.
That's a pretty bad example to choose to suppport a 'for' argument I think! I wonder how many motorists have suffered a snapped belt and the associated cost and damage, it bends my mind that a device can be fitted to an engine which when it breaks (frequently before its service interval) will cause enough damage to virtually write off many engines. It also seems that many manufacturers are now reverting to the good old chain too (my Mazda uses one).

Having said that I guite like the idea of low maintenance and no oil getting flung around so wouldn't mind one myself and although it doesn't quite have the same charm as a chain when you examine it cloes up I wonder how visible it is from a normal viewing position? BUT I don't like the idea of paying $549 (which will probaly equate to > £549) or the "relaxed highway cursing" and I think the visual design of the rear sprocket could be a bit more inspired, perhaps they could use a better CNC machine (or driver)?
 

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Anecdotes aren't data, but my folks had a Fiat that broke its timing chain, totally trashed the engine.
Of course chains can break but not normally within the kind of interval in which a belt will and will usually give some indication before they go. Mind you I think you can write off a Fiat sometimes just by looking at it funny!
 
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