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Hello Chaps/chapettes.

Does anyone know if there are any 4-pot callipers I can bung on my Legend- the wife's not getting any thinner!
 

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You Devil!

I've not got an answer to your question, but wanted to applaud your bravery in blaming the need for better braking on your wife's m"ass".

You do realize, of course, she COULD read that post??
 

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There are a couple of companies in UK that make six pot's that bolt on. Harrison, is one, I forget the name of the other one.

Very pricey.


There are no 4 pots from Japaneese bikes that will bolt on.
You are looking at an adapter plate, or changing forks to make other calipers work.
 

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Thanks- that's what I thought. Guess it'll be a subscription to Weightwatchers for a Valentine's Day prezzie, then! Long distance!!! :D
 

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Though it would be easier to have a 4pot that just bolts up, I went ahead and used what I had available in my parts bin. You may need to switch master cylinders depending on the feel of the brakes after the changeover. If too hard when pumped and very little "feel", then need smaller diameter master. Too much lever movement, then need larger diameter master.

Or get your wife her own bike.

 

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Hi,

A thin billet, purpose machined 4-pot caliper, for the Thunderbird/Legend was produced by Beringer. I have one. They also produce a 6-pot too (as do Harrison Billet and Pretech). All are "bolt on".

You have to be very careful that the caliper does not fowl the spokes, which is why these aftermarket 4 & 6 pots are purpose made billet items, with a thinner design.

Best regards
Geoff

ps. Forgot to mention that a 6-pot will require a floating disc, and possibly recommended to have a larger master cylinder too.
A strong selling point of the Beringer 4-pot, for me, was that you can stay using a solid disc (if you wish - apparently because of their "piston design"?) and a larger m/c is not required.

Have you thought about other options? Are the brakelines SS? Perhaps use a Ferrous disc - better braking than the Stainless Steel OEM disc, but does wear quickly and can have a rusty look after being left. Sintered (EBC HH) pads?
 

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street light sensors

Look at the bright side - no waiting for minutes for a red light that won't change:)
 

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Hi,

snip

ps. Forgot to mention that a 6-pot will require a floating disc, and possibly recommended to have a larger master cylinder too.
A strong selling point of the Beringer 4-pot, for me, was that you can stay using a solid disc (if you wish - apparently because of their "piston design"?) and a larger m/c is not required.
snip

You had me scared there a bit with your comment that a 6 pot requires a floating disc. It finally occurred to me that none of my bikes had/have floating calipers unless they were single pot calipers and none of my bike rotors float either.

I can imagine benefits to floating units the same as i sort of understand that radial mounted brakes are better. Is there some consequence to having non-floating calipers with non-floating rotors other than being old school?
 

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toller; said:
snip

Is there some consequence to having non-floating calipers with non-floating rotors other than being old school?
Hi 'toller',

I think this is one for you to consult a Motor Engineer.

It is certainly my understanding that I should avoid putting a 'modern' OEM solid multi-pot caliper with a solid disc.

Looking at the standard equipment on most motorcycles bares this out. If you take the Triumph T300 range, then the solid discs always have sliding calipers, and the solid (4 & 6-pot) calipers always have floating discs.

Good luck
Geoff
 

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The Street Triple has floating discs and floating calipers (in fact the very same calipers as the Thunderbird). So floating/floating works.

The solid caliper / solid disc combination is probably not a good idea as it would require perfect centering. The longer the caliper, the more difficult to achieve.

I am using 6 pot solid calipers from Beringer on my TBS and I switched to floating rotors. Tip-screech :D. Bit of an overkill but it looks and feels great.

As an alternative you could look for a TBS fork and front wheel.

cheers

Budd
 
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